Message from the Principal

Dear Parents, Caregivers and Friends,

Over the past six months we have been working with our parents to build a stronger partnership that binds the school and the parents to enhance the potential of our students’ learning outcomes.

Our parents are passionate and generous spirited; they participate enthusiastically in our cocurricular programs and in our community activities. Our parent involvement is as spectators, supporters, fundraisers and organisers. We are hoping to enhance our partnership by offering opportunities to support parents to participate in the learning processes. This does not involve doing more, rather doing things differently. We are shifting the emphasis of our parent support groups from fundraising to a meaningful engagement linked to our girls learning. We will: create support networks to help our school community to share best practice, provide ongoing professional learning for staff and the opportunity for families to build their capacity to support their children’s learning at home. This is not a challenge to the authority of teachers nor is a mandate for parents to reshape the curriculum. Both school and parents can play to their strengths – parents raising their children to value the education they receive and creating a supportive home environment for learning; schools and teachers providing the learning base and facilities that build the scaffolding our children need.

The future world our girls will engage in will be very different to our experience of our world. We are now more connected; individuals and networks are more technologically enabled and communication is faster and more important. A powerful and proactive partnership between the school and the home will create strength for the future world. Technology allows our students more capacity to learn anywhere, anytime. At the same time, technology gives parents greater visibility of their children’s education.

Research nationally and internationally overwhelmingly confirms the impact of an engaged approach. While this is widely understood by educational leaders, it is not necessarily understood or fully valued by parents and teachers.

While we understand parent engagement is a “game-changer” in education, best practice on delivering it is less clear. This triangle between families, school and students needs to build on respect, trust, a clear delineation of roles, and excellent communication. Engagement must be flexible and developed in a collaborative manner supporting parents to lead learning. Engagement will look differently in each school. It will depend on the preparedness of our parents to “get onboard”, the encouragement of the leadership team, the communication from the school and good will on both sides.

We have made a positive start to parent engagement initiatives in 2018:

  • re-framing P&F to Parents of Stuartholme (PoS) with new terms of reference,
  • Presentation of a comprehensive report twice on the first day of each term for our Boarding Parents Network and our PoS,
  • Engaged Rachel Saliba from Practically Learning, to present to our PoS Leadership Team in May and possibly future workshops depending on parent interest,
  • Three of our Stuartholme parents are attending a Catholic Schools Parent Engagement Conference in Townsville this weekend,
  • Michael Elliot has facilitated workshops for parents to learn how to be actively involved in study and homework techniques.
  • Deanne Johnston, Deputy Principal, will review our current reporting practices of our girls’ learning, implementing more access for parents for 2019.

Our parent engagement approach and partnership are evolving. We together, school and our parents will learn the best way forward, gaining a better understanding and shifting thinking at every level. We need to approach this with respect and caution as our intention is not to bury our traditions but to complement them with new courageous understandings. This applies to parent groups and school leaders and teachers who need to be re-assured their professionalism and authority will not be challenged. Conversations and collaborations need to take place. We will support parents to learn new skills and we will support teachers to open up and share their teaching intentions. These new ways of thinking will not happen readily without trust and agreed understanding that improved student outcomes is the focus. This is a cultural change which will take years rather than months. We have taken the first few steps and are hopeful and confident of a positive vibrant partnership with our passionate and generous spirited parents.

Our last fortnight has been full of great community building and successes.

Our student exchanges have been very active. We’ve have hosted girls from the ANZNet Sacred Heart schools, Sacre Couer Melbourne, Kincoppal Rose Bay Sydney and Baradene Auckland, for Madeleine Sophie Day. Our girls will be visiting our ANZnet school for their Feast of the Sacred Heart celebrations. We have also welcomed 10 girls from France, who are staying with host families for 10 days. Wonderful opportunity to promote cultural awareness and build lifelong friendships with our Sacred Heart Network.

Our House cultural competitions continue this term. TMs competed in the Lip Sync battles at lunch time to earn points for their House. These points, along with results from the Solo Music Awards, which were held last Sunday and the Choral Competition decide which House wins the Interhouse Music Trophy. High spirits, exceptional talent and gumption are all contributing to some healthy community building competition.

Congratulations to Stuartholme Cross Country Team – the 2018 CaSSSA Cross Country Champions. Our girls competed in Ipswich last Thursday. The girls train very had under the guidance of their coach, Chris Gale, and we are extremely proud of their win.

Interhouse Athletics Carnival was a significant whole school event held on Wednesday at UQ. Our generous spirited students to participated and competed to earn points for their House. Congratulations to Parker House on winning the Carnival this year and to all the students who challenged themselves.

Every year, on the weekend closest to 25 May, we celebrate Madeleine Sophie’s Feast Day with our Alumnae Reunion weekend. Once a Stuartholme girl, always a Stuartholme girl. We welcomed our Alumnae back to the school for a cocktail party on Friday night and Mass and morning tea on Sunday. These get-togethers are animated and inspiring. Our Cor Unum spirit lasts through the years. We have alums ranging from in their 80’s to 18 years of age – all exuding their sense of belonging to Stuartholme.

All of our liturgies intend to touch our hearts. However, our National Sorry Day Liturgy, on Monday 28 May, was exceptional. Our indigenous girls collaborated with Sarah Daff, our Dean of Mission, to create an empathetic relational ritual, which included a symbolic drama piece, poetry and beautiful reflections by our indigenous girls. Imani Tamwoy in Year 12, who called on all Australians to ‘plant this seed that grows into hopes of fairness, and equality and a country where our humanity isn’t justified by the colour of our skin. So let us all plant the seed by saying Sorry, and watch our nation grow and flourish bigger and stronger from there. But we in no way, want the non-indigenous to feel regret or guilt for the wrong-doings that have occurred in the past. Just like we indigenous Australians should not be filled with hate, or anger.” Our indigenous girls are truly inspiring, their powerful message touched our hearts.

Take care and God bless,

Kristen Sharpe

Key Dates

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Key Dates

DateEvent
Thurs 7-Thurs 14 JuneYear 11 assessment block
Fri 8-Thurs 14 JuneYear 12 assessment block
Fri 15 JuneInterhouse Choral Competition
Mon 18-Wed 20 JuneYear 11 Leadership Days
Mon 18-Tue 19 JuneYear 12 QCS practice test
Wed 20 JuneYear 12 photo
Thurs 21 JuneYears 7-9 Parent Daughter Breakfast
Year 11 Harmony Day
Classes finish
Fri 22 JuneBoarders travel day
Year 12 Formal
Mon 16 JulyBoarders return
Boarder Parent Network meeting 10-11.30am
Year 10 into 11 Boarding Parent Subject Information Session 12pm
Parent Community Groups Principal Meeting 11.30am-12.30pm
Parent Teacher interviews 10am-7pm
Tues 17 JulyStudents start
School fees due

Message from the Deputy Principal

At the end of 2018, I will have completed my 25th year of teaching. As I think back across the years, I reflect on how …

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Message from the Deputy Principal

At the end of 2018, I will have completed my 25th year of teaching. As I think back across the years, I reflect on how different education is from when I entered my first classroom in the little NSW apple-growing town of Batlow. At the time, my 20th century education degree had been heavily focused on imparting curriculum content and maintaining a well-disciplined classroom. Assessment was about how well students remembered what the teacher had taught.

To meet the demands of our rapidly changing 21st century, however, students need more than core subject knowledge (Bruniges 2012). They need ‘generic learning outcomes as well as discipline-specific learning outcomes’ (Bowman 2010) so that they can become lifelong learners and confident global citizens who create opportunities (Department of Education and Training 2016).

Both the Australian Curriculum and the new senior syllabuses incorporate a broad set of skills to help students achieve success in further education and in life. As we transition to Queensland’s new senior system, our Directors of Studies are working with the Leaders of Learning and their faculties to map these underpinning skills within year levels and subjects but also across the school. They are looking at which units explicitly teach the skills and how they’re developed over the six years at Stuartholme. The process of mapping has revealed that there is much evidence that Stuartholme’s teachers actively teach the knowledge and skills students need in order to be equipped for the demands of higher education, work and life, and to participate effectively in the community and the economy (QCAA, 2017).

We also continue to look for ways to develop our teaching practices in order to maximise student success. This includes in the use of technology, an area that is constantly changing and transforming the way teachers teach and students learn. We are fortunate to have Andrew Webster, our E-Learning Facilitator, who does a fantastic job of supporting teachers to develop technological confidence and prowess. In particular, the school’s commitment to OneNote has certainly made a difference to being able to engage, extend and challenge students as well as to track student learning and provide feedback.

There is also much evidence that Stuartholme’s teachers promote critical and creative thinking within the classroom. Our professional learning sessions have allowed teachers to share how they currently promote a culture of thinking, to consider how we build on our ability to teach critical and creative thinking skills in a range of forms and how we collect evidence of student thinking.  This is interesting in itself as, by its very nature, thinking can be an invisible and elusive process, making it challenging to measure.

Last week Stuartholme School sent three teachers, Ben Hegerty, Andrew Marshall and Kyra Theodorou, to Perth to participate in a two-day workshop with Dr Ron Ritchhart who is considered one of the world’s leading researchers and educators in the field. Dr Ritchhart, a Principal Investigator and Senior Research Associate at Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education, argues that learning is a product of thinking and if we want our students to learn well and develop understanding, we must create cultures of thinking that actively engage students in thinking on an ongoing basis (ronritchhart.com).  His workshop focused on the practical and concrete ways educators can create a culture of thinking in their schools and classrooms, foster the kinds of thinking opportunities that lead to deep understanding of content, and how to look for evidence of student thinking and understanding. We are looking forward to them sharing their learnings with the staff so that we can continue to build on our abilities to facilitate classrooms where thinking is valued, visible, and actively promoted.

Bowman, K 2010, Background Paper for the AQF Council on Generic Skills, South Australian Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology on behalf of the Australian Qualifications Framework Council, Adelaide SA.
Bruniges, M 2012, 21st Century Skills for Australian Students, report from 21st Century Skills Forum, Tokyo, Japan, 14 November, NSW Education and Communities, Sydney NSW, www.dec.nsw.gov.au/documents/15060385/15385042/21C_skills_for_Australian_students_1411 12.pdf.
Department of Education and Training 2016, Advancing Education: An action plan for education in Queensland, www.advancingeducation.qld.gov.au.
Queensland Curriculum and Assessment Authority 2017, 21st century skills for senior curriculum A position paper, https://www.qcaa.qld.edu.au/downloads/senior/snr_syll_redev_21st_century_skills_position_paper.pdf

Queensland’s new senior system

Thank you to all Year 10 parents who were able to attend Tuesday evening’s information session on the new Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE). We hope it was informative and helpful for all who attended. Whilst the QCAA processes for the new senior system are fairly clear and have been outlined to schools through information sessions and professional development, we are still receiving updates from the universities and QTAC regarding the new system for tertiary entrance.

We will continue to provide further information as it comes to hand and we will update families at next term’s subject selection evening. However, it is very important that Year 10 families regularly check university and QTAC websites, particularly regarding subject prerequisites and the use of VET qualifications as a standalone method of entry to university.  Stuartholme staff are more than happy to meet to discuss or clarify information if required. Please note the new system applies to students who are currently in Year 10 who will be looking to enter tertiary institutions from 2021.  There are no changes to the entrance processes for students currently in Years 11 and 12. If you do have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact us.

 

Deanne Johnston
Deputy Principal

Message from the Dean of Mission

Today is the Solemnity of Most Sacred Heart of Jesus. If you look at our Stuartholme logo you will see two hearts in the centre. …

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Message from the Dean of Mission

Today is the Solemnity of Most Sacred Heart of Jesus. If you look at our Stuartholme logo you will see two hearts in the centre.

One is the Immaculate heart of Mary distinguished by the sword that pierces it and the other the Sacred Heart of Jesus encircled by a crown of thorns. Today we focus on the Heart of Christ.

Sr Margie Conroy rscJ explains the importance of this symbol to us.

“The heart is a symbol in every culture. It stands for the core, the centre, the deepest meaning of a person or an event. So you often hear, “let us get to the heart of the matter.” We are dedicated to the heart of Jesus, to the deepest meaning of him, to the core, the centre that gives his life meaning. That meaning is love, love that drove him to lay down his life for us, not only in his passion and death but during his life on earth and after his resurrection and now, in the Body, the Church, the People of God. To lay down your life does not mean just a violent death. It means spending your energy day after day caring for those you are with until after your life ends.

We are called to become the Heart of Christ on earth today – all of us.”

We, as a community that contemplates the Heart of Christ, are called to live in love and to use this symbol as a source of strength, compassion and hope.

Today we also acknowledge the Society of the Religious of the Sacred Heart – particularly Sr Rita Carroll and Sr Genny Bannon who are at the core of our Stuartholme community. We give thanks for Sr Carroll and Sr Bannon and all rscJ sisters around the world for their loving example of gracious service to others and commitment to God.

We offer these prayers today:

God of Peace, you reside deep in the well of our being. May you give us the desire and capacity to shut out the busyness of our lives and find moments of stillness and peace in the Heart of Christ.

God of Compassion, you have made us great-hearted like you, may we carry your love and compassion to the ends of the earth, particularly to those who feel unloved and isolated from the world.

God of Love, you have called each of us by name. May we respect the innate beauty and uniqueness of your creation, and strive to build communities where all grow and flourish.

God of Wisdom, you gave your only Son so that our sins may be forgiven. Just as Jesus’ sides were pierced, may we recognise our wounds, and the wounds of others, and work to not tear down what is fragile within us, but to discover the beauty and strength of our flaws.

I hope you find moments of light and love today and in your weekend,

Sarah Daff
Dean of Mission

 

Message from the Dean of Student Wellbeing

The Benefits of Relaxation Activities At different times of the term it is hard to relax when you have so many things to do. However, …

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Message from the Dean of Student Wellbeing

The Benefits of Relaxation Activities

At different times of the term it is hard to relax when you have so many things to do. However, far from wasting time, relaxation helps us to be more productive and effective. (except of course if you do too much relaxing!)

As we embark on a busy time in terms of assessment and exams I thought it was worthwhile sharing the benefits of relaxation to a student’s wellbeing. I am pleased to provide information developed by our School Counsellors here at Stuartholme.

Ten Benefits of Relaxation

  1. Reduction of general anxiety.
  2. Prevention in the accumulation of stress.
  3. Increased energy level and productivity.
  4. Improved concentration and memory.
  5. Reduction of insomnia and fatigue.
  6. Increased self-confidence.
  7. Relaxing protects your heart.
  8. Relaxing lowers your risk of catching a cold.
  9. Relaxing can improve your mood and make you less resentful towards all the ‘jobs’ you have to do.
  10. Relaxing helps you make better decisions.

Ideas for small but effective relaxation

  • Have a little snooze or just rest your eyes. Even 15 minutes of Mental Stillness can work wonders.
  • Engage in “Take 5” or 5 minutes of mindfulness like we do at school each day after lunch.
  • Make yourself a cup of tea or hot chocolate. The act of doing this says “it is ok to stop”.
  • Read one chapter of a book that has nothing to do with school.
  • Do something creative… draw, sing, dance, paint your toenails, decorate your room, knit, make a digital photobook.
  • It is OK to switch off… your phone, your computer, your light, your brain.

 

Deb Lonsdale-Walker
Dean of Student Wellbeing

Invitation to important parent consultation on NAPLAN

The Queensland Parents & Friends Federation would like to invite parents to NAPLAN forums in Brisbane, being held by the Department of Education. The Department …

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Invitation to important parent consultation on NAPLAN

The Queensland Parents & Friends Federation would like to invite parents to NAPLAN forums in Brisbane, being held by the Department of Education.

The Department of Education is gathering information about NAPLAN and all  parents are invited to attend a local forum.

Dr. Gabrielle Matters (Gabrielle Matters Consulting – Assessment in Education – systems design and review) has been commissioned to do this work.

Please take the time to come and share your views at the following NAPLAN forums in Brisbane:

When :                Monday 11 June 2018
Where:                Broncos  Red Hill Leagues Club
Time:                    4.30pm refreshments  5.00- 6.00pm forum , speakers will be available  for 30 minutes following event

Or

When :                Tuesday 12 June 2018
Where:                Time: Carina Leagues Club
Time:                    4.30pm refreshments  5.00- 6.00pm forum , speakers will be available  for 30 minutes following event

Your input will be most welcome. To book your spot at one of the forums, please email NAPLAN@novumAVI.com.au​.

Survey

In addition to the forums, parents are invited to provide their feedback via the online​ survey​. This survey will take around 10 minutes to complete.

 

Study skills sessions – Years 7, 8, 9

Thank you to everyone who attended the parent session last week on how to help your daughter to study effectively and prepare for tests. This session was …

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Study skills sessions – Years 7, 8, 9

Thank you to everyone who attended the parent session last week on how to help your daughter to study effectively and prepare for tests. This session was a follow-up to three similar lunch-time sessions, open to students in Years 7, 8 and 9.

The sessions covered 6 simple evidence-based strategies. For parents who were unable to attend, a Powerpoint of the presentation with notes can be found on the Year level pages (7-9) in My Stuartholme. The booklet distributed to students who attended one of the lunchtime sessions is also available.

Should you have any questions or queries, please contact Michael Elliott, Junior Studies Director.

Interhouse Choral Competition

The Interhouse Choral Competition will be taking place on Friday 15 June. Below is a schedule for the day and your rehearsal times and location. …

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Interhouse Choral Competition

The Interhouse Choral Competition will be taking place on Friday 15 June. Below is a schedule for the day and your rehearsal times and location.

 

 TMG:  8.25am Normal TMG Rooms

House Rehearsal Times:

(All rehearsals to take place on the Theatre Stage)

Stuart: 8.45am – 9.15am (Rooms R205/R206)

Macrae: 9.15 – 9.45am (Rooms R103/R104)

Coen: 9.45 – 10.15am (Rooms R101/R102)

Morning Tea: 10.15 – 11.00am

House Rehearsal Times continued:

(All rehearsals to take place on the Theatre Stage)

Woodlock: 11.00 – 11.30am (Room R203)

Toohey: 11.30am – 12.00noon (Rooms R207/R208)

Parker: 12.00noon – 12.30pm (Rooms R106/R107)

Lunch: 12.30pm – 1.15pm

Move to Theatre/Set up: 1.15pm

Choral Competition: 1.20pm – 2.45pm

 

Performance order:

 

Stuart Be Our Guest from Beauty & the Beast
Macrae Under the Sea from The Little Mermaid
Coen I Won’t Say I’m In Love from Hercules
Woodlock Hawaiian Rollercoaster Ride from Lilo & Stitch
Toohey Friend Like Me from Aladdin
Parker You Are the Music in Me from High School Musical 2

Announcement of winners and presentation of trophies

Pack up and return to TMG for Roll Call: 2.45 – 3.00pm

 

The Choral Competition is the final event for the Interhouse Music Festival. At the conclusion of the Choral Competition, all House points will be calculated and the winners of the Choral Competition and overall winning Interhouse House Music trophy will be announced.

This event is a wonderful way for the school community to celebrate together. Please give special consideration to your House Captains as they will appreciate your full support.

You will need to arrive and depart in school uniform. Your House Captains will remind you of what you need to bring on the day.

Check list:

  1. Arrive/Depart: school uniform
  2. Rehearse/Perform: drama blacks and additional House colours/items (advised by your Captains) NB: NO GLITTER OR PAINT
  3. Bring your morning tea/lunch and a water bottle

I look forward to hearing your House song and wish you all the best for the Choral Competition!

Andrew Mear
Director of Music

Interhouse Music Fesitival

The Interhouse Music Festival Solo Music Awards were held on Sunday, 27 May.  115 students performed in 13 sections over 4 categories (Vocal, Piano, Strings, …

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Interhouse Music Fesitival

The Interhouse Music Festival Solo Music Awards were held on Sunday, 27 May.  115 students performed in 13 sections over 4 categories (Vocal, Piano, Strings, Band) and it was amazing to see the talent of the girls on display. Special congratulations to the students who performed in front of their families, peers and adjudicators.

Thank you to our private music teachers, piano accompanists and Music Support Group who assisted the girls in their wonderful performances.

Our very accomplished adjudicators who came to us from various schools and musical backgrounds, had a difficult task in selecting the winners.  All spoke of how important it was to participate and the experience and self-confidence this brings to the girls.  They were very impressed with the level of talent and the hard work displayed by our Stuartholme girls.

Congratulations to the following award recipients:

Section          First Second Third Highly Commended
Jnr Band

Year 7

Harriet Moore

Stuart

Tenor Sax

Emily Shearer

Macrae

Vibraphone

Elizabeth Hopkins

Coen

Snare Drum

Isabella Smith

Parker

Trumpet

Jnr Band

Year 8

Lily Beck

Parker

Tenor Sax

Eloise Pietsch

Stuart

Alto Sax

Georgia Betts

Macrae

Tenor Sax

Georgia Manthey

Macrae

Clarinet

Sasha de Aboitiz

Stuart

Alto Sax

Amelia Ashley

Alto Sax

Toohey

Jnr Band

Year 9

Abigail Moore

Stuart

Flute

Laura Stanley

Parker

Drum Kit

Isabella Copley

Parker

Alto Sax

Olivia Nancarrow

Stuart

Trumpet

Snr Band

Years 10,

11 & 12

Zoe Findlay

Yr 12

Woodlock

Flute

Ella Hookway

Yr 12

Macrae

Flute

Caiti Betts

Yr 12

Macrae

Clarinet

Leah Reeves

Yr 12

Macrae

Trombone

Celia Georghiou

Yr 12

Parker

Baritone Sax

Jnr Strings

Year 7 (MISS)

Rose Hollingdrake

Parker

Double Bass

Alice Greenan

Toohey

Cello

Grace Bentley

Stuart

Viola

Grace Brown

Toohey

Cello

Sophie O’ Brien

Woodlock

Violin

Jnr Strings

Year 7

Alex O’Brien

Woodlock

Violin

Maggie de Araujo

Stuart

Double Bass

Grace Clulow

Woodlock

Violin

Claire Bowlay

Macrae

Violin

Olivia Murray

Toohey

Violin

Kate McGann

Toohey

Viola

Jnr Strings

Year 8

Ava Hill

Macrae

Cello

Julia Joubert

Stuart

Violin

Prue Herbertson

Woodlock

Viola

Charlotte Berehulak

Parker

Violin

Lani

McDonald-Smith

Toohey

Violin

Holly Carroll

Toohey

Viola

Jnr Strings

Year 9

Sophie Smith

Toohey

Violin

Saskia MacMillan

Woodlock

Violin

Elle Edwards

Toohey

Violin

Gabi Rees

Macrae

Violin

Sophie Smith

Toohey

Viola

Amelie Johnston

Macrae

Cello

Snr Strings

Years 10,

11 & 12

Arissa Geissler

Yr 10

Toohey

Harp

Chanel Kani

Yr 10

Coen

Violin

Niece Dickman

Yr 10

Woodlock

Violin

n/a
Jnr Vocal

Years 7,

8 & 9

Sophie Roach

Yr 9

Parker

Ciara Royds

Yr 8

Stuart

Holly Ridgway

Yr 9

Macrae

Annabelle Fisher

Yr 7

Coen

Snr Vocal

Years 10,

11 & 12

Lucy Sevil

Yr 12

Woodlock

Bridget

Lloyd-Morgan

Yr 11

Parker

Emma Cook

Yr 10

Woodlock

Ella Harris-Laver

Yr 12

Woodlock

Leah Reeves

Yr 12

Macrae

Jnr Piano

Years 7,

8 & 9

Jaeyeon Jung

Yr 9

Stuart

Sophia Buller

Yr 9

Woodlock

Alessa Wiltshire

Yr 8

Parker

Sasha de Aboitiz

Yr 8

Stuart

Darcy Mansul

Yr 7

Toohey

Isabella Huynh

Yr 8

Woodlock

Snr Piano

Years 10,

11 & 12

Madeleine Armstrong

Yr 10

Woodlock

Dina Sun

Yr 12

Stuart

Caiti Betts

Yr 12

Macrae

Madeleine Huynh

Yr 10

Woodlock

Charlene Deng

Yr 10

Macrae

Melanie Ashley

Yr 10

Toohey

 

Stuartholme students provide input to the Queensland Anti-Cyberbullying Taskforce

Stuartholme is committed to promoting positive peer relationships. No form of bullying is acceptable under any circumstances. Students, as well as staff and parents, play …

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Stuartholme students provide input to the Queensland Anti-Cyberbullying Taskforce

Stuartholme is committed to promoting positive peer relationships. No form of bullying is acceptable under any circumstances. Students, as well as staff and parents, play an important role in creating a safe and happy school environment for all.

On Thursday last week, Year 11 students Ilaria Dell-Annunziata and Bridget Lloyd-Morgan, accompanied by Ms Jen MGrath, participated in the Secondary Students’ Forum at Parliament House, hosted by the Taskforce Chair, Madonna King.

The Taskforce is working with a range of people to harness grassroots ideas and best-practice research to oversee strategies and initiatives that address these challenges. Empowering and engaging young people is a significant part of delivering effective solutions.

Just like Bullying is not a ‘one off’ but a sustained and on-going misuse of power, Cyberbullying is not simply ‘being mean’ with a comment on social media.  Cyberbullying is repeated attacks using technology.

Secondary school students from all over Brisbane discussed and shared their ideas to reduce the incidence of cyberbullying and what more we all can do to provide support and help for people who have been affected.

Where can you go for extra help or advice?

Deb Lonsdale-Walker
Dean of Student Wellbeing

 

Volunteering in the School Shop

If you have some time to help out in the shop, there are available times before school and during the breaks. Click here for the …

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Volunteering in the School Shop

If you have some time to help out in the shop, there are available times before school and during the breaks. Click here for the link for the volunteer roster.

Thank you in advance,

Andrea McAvoy
School Shop Manager

 

School Hats

A large number of hats are quite dirty and damaged at the moment.  We have once again been able to access the services of a …

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School Hats

A large number of hats are quite dirty and damaged at the moment.  We have once again been able to access the services of a milliner who will re-block, clean and mend school hats.

Can you please check your daughter’s hat and if it is in need of cleaning, please place it in a plastic shopping bag with your daughter’s name and class on the outside of the bag and have your daughter drop it into my office on either Tuesday or Wednesday, 19 or 20 June 2018.

Cost will be $25.00 and is to be placed into an envelope accompanying the hat.  If your hat needs a new trim as well, the cost is $35.00.  Hats that require further mending will be charged slightly more and the money will be collected once the hats are returned to school.  Hats will be ready for collection at the beginning of Term Three, 2018.

Deb Lonsdale-Walker
Dean of Student Wellbeing

Year 11 Biology and Geography Camp

On Wednesday 23 May, the Year 11 Biology and Geography students hopped on a bus and headed to North Stradbroke for the next day and a …

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Year 11 Biology and Geography Camp

On Wednesday 23 May, the Year 11 Biology and Geography students hopped on a bus and headed to North Stradbroke for the next day and a half.

It was a once in a life time event to investigate the environment that we are so used to taking for granted. Both days were jam packed with activities, with the camp kicking off with a visit to Myora Springs to investigate a mangrove community. By far the best activity of the camp was the comparison investigation between 18-Mile Swamp and Brown Lake. We were investigating the differences between the two places by taking water samples and identifying macroinvertebrates. This meant that one girl for each of the sites had to hop into the water and collect a sample, which was an interesting experience for all involved.

Overall, the camp was a major learning experience for all, which I feel has enabled me to grasp the methods of sampling in a more practical manner and enhanced my understanding of ecology.

Zara Munro, Year 11

Geography happenings

On Monday, 4 June, Year 9 HASS-Geography students had the pleasure of presenting their research findings into the Geographies of Interconnections to the wider parent …

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Geography happenings

On Monday, 4 June, Year 9 HASS-Geography students had the pleasure of presenting their research findings into the Geographies of Interconnections to the wider parent community.

The girls developed skills in research, collaboration, communication and data presentation, working hard on their Annotated Visual Displays for the whole of the term. They incorporated the use of technology, creativity and problem solving. For their assessment task, the girls chose a product impacting the environment, analysed data to support their findings and discovered a solution. They proudly presented their creative digital posters during the exhibition and confidently answered questions from parents about their topic. A variety of very interesting findings were showcased with great enthusiasm in the school’s library.

The Year 9 Geography teachers were impressed with the girls’ dedication to this project and would like to thank all the attending parents and family members for their support and active participation on the evening.

On behalf of Ms Johnson, Ms Hudson and Mr Oglethorpe, I would also like to thank Mrs Gaggin and the library team, for assisting us on the night and Ms Sharpe and Ms Daff for attending.

On another note, during a recent lesson, the Year 12 Geography students were addressed by Dr Dorina Pojani, Senior Lecturer in Urban Planning at the University of Queensland. Dr Pojani presented on sustainable transport options, posing provocative questions and providing insight and information for the students as they prepared for their assessment.  Her visit to the classroom was greatly appreciated.

Wendy Bolton
Leader of Learning, Humanities and Social Science

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Science Snippets

Do you want to live forever? Researchers at Brisbane’s Translational Research Institute say they have discovered a means of repairing damaged DNA. By doing so, …

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Science Snippets

Do you want to live forever?

Researchers at Brisbane’s Translational Research Institute say they have discovered a means of repairing damaged DNA. By doing so, this discovery holds the promise of preventing a whole range of diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer’s, dementia and heart disease. The key is a repair enzyme called HSSB1 whose job is to fix broken sections of DNA that can occur during cell division, particularly as people get older (https://www.qut.edu.au/news?news-id=130668).

“The list of diseases humankind has managed to defeat is impressive – polio, typhoid, measles, tetanus, yellow fever, smallpox, diphtheria and chicken pox have been almost completely eliminated in many parts of the world. Vaccines and powerful drugs have allowed our species to fight back against the bacteria, parasites and viruses that threaten to kill us. But throughout history, humans have suffered from a condition that they have never been able to escape – ageing. As we get older, our cells stop working as well and can break down, leading to conditions like cancer, heart disease, arthritis and Alzheimer’s disease. Together, ageing-related diseases are responsible for 100,000 deaths per day and billions are spent around the world trying to slow their steady march on our bodies. Some researchers, however, believe we may be thinking about these conditions in the wrong way. They say we should start treating ageing itself as a disease – one that can be prevented and treated. Their hopes are founded on recent discoveries that suggest biological ageing may be entirely preventable and treatable. From a biological perspective, the body ages at different rates according to genetic and environmental factors. Tiny errors build up in our DNA and our cells begin developing faults that can accumulate into tissue damage. The extent of these changes over time can mean the difference between a healthy old age or one spent housebound and afflicted by chronic diseases.” (Wray, 2018 from http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20180203-the-ambitious-quest-to-cure-ageing-like-a-disease)  

Science in the Community:

“The ConocoPhillips Science Experience is a fun 3 or 4 days of science activities for Year 9 and 10 students in 2018 program year. Each program is designed to provide students who have an interest in science with an opportunity to engage in a wide range of fascinating science activities under the guidance of scientists who love their work.

The program takes place in over thirty-five universities and tertiary institutions, within many different laboratories and lecture theatres. Participants perform experiments in the laboratories, meet and hear senior lecturers in the lecture theatres, attend site visits and walk around and experience what it is like to be on the campus of a university or tertiary institution. More than 65,000 students have taken this rare opportunity, up to date.

The program also provides information about further studies in science, technology and engineering. It highlights the wide range of careers that allow students to pursue their interest and abilities in the sciences.

One aspect of the program often commented on by participants is the opportunity to meet and share ideas with students from different schools. Each program includes a BBQ or other social activity.” (Directly copied from https://www.scienceexperience.com.au/)

Good luck to everyone who has exams coming up, stay calm and keep going.

Imogen Cusack,
UQ Science Ambassador 2018

Junior Public Speaking

On Monday 4 June, students from Years 7-9 competed in the annual Junior Public Speaking Competition.  Six students presented pre-prepared speeches to the junior years …

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Junior Public Speaking

On Monday 4 June, students from Years 7-9 competed in the annual Junior Public Speaking Competition.  Six students presented pre-prepared speeches to the junior years that motivated the audience to think about their impact on others.

At the beginning of the Term, students selected a quote to guide their speech and worked independently to write and rehearse their speeches.

Congratulations to Sophia Buller (Year 9) for winning the Junior Public Speaking Competition as well as to runner-up Holly Clemson (Year 8)! It was a very difficult decision for the two adjudicators who commended all students on their confidence to speak in front of so many of their peers.

Arissa’s outstanding achievements

Congratulations to Arissa Geissler, Year 10, on her outstanding results at the Ipswich Junior Eisteddfod. Arissa won: 1st prize String Solo (age 13 to 20 years) …

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Arissa’s outstanding achievements

Congratulations to Arissa Geissler, Year 10, on her outstanding results at the Ipswich Junior Eisteddfod.

Arissa won:

  • 1st prize String Solo (age 13 to 20 years)
  • 1st prize Instrumental Solo Championship (age 13 to 15 years)
  • Intermediate (13 to 15 years) Instrumental Bursary
  • Gladys Payne Memorial Bursary – Instrumental

Arissa has also been asked to perform a solo at a concert in the near future.

Well done Arissa!

 

Years 7-9 Parent Daughter Breakfast

The Years 7-9 Parent Daughter Breakfast will be held on Thursday 21 June from 7am until approximately 8.30am. This morning provides a special opportunity for …

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Years 7-9 Parent Daughter Breakfast

The Years 7-9 Parent Daughter Breakfast will be held on Thursday 21 June from 7am until approximately 8.30am.

This morning provides a special opportunity for the parents of daughters in Years 7-9 to get together and mingle with their daughters and friends. Please join us for a stand-up breakfast outside the Joigny Cafe before a hearing from our guest speaker, Taylor O’Neill (Class of 2013) in the Theatre.

Taylor’s passion for Ancient Egypt inspired her to take ancient history subjects while at Stuartholme. Exploring the ancient worlds of Greece and Italy only enhanced her interest and led her to study an Archaeology major at the University of Queensland. Taylor has recently had hands-on experience on a dig in Tasmania, uncovering some of Australia’s richest finds. In June, Taylor will travel to the UK where she has been accepted to do a summer school at Oxford and Cambridge University for ancient history.

Taylor will talk to parents and students about her career path and how if you follow your passions, you can achieve the career of your dreams.

This is a complimentary event, however, for catering purposes can you please RSVP via the websiteParking will be available on the oval.