In this issue

Key dates
Co-curricular News
Science Snippets
Social Justice News
Sr Kiran teaches students to make dahl
Bus Network
Honour Pockets in Term 3
Refer a student and help build our community
School Shop
Centenary Book and merchandise

Message from the Principal

Dear Parents, Caregivers and Friends, Please click here to watch my Newsletter issue 9 address.   Take care and God Bless, Kristen Sharpe Principal        

From the Principal
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Message from the Principal

Dear Parents, Caregivers and Friends,

Please click here to watch my Newsletter issue 9 address.

 

Take care and God Bless,

Kristen Sharpe
Principal

 

 

 

 

Key Dates

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Key Dates

Fri 19 JuneLast day of Term 2
Classes finish at midday
Mon 13 JulyParent/Student/Teacher Conferences 10am-8pm
Boarder Parent Network Meeting 11.30-1pm
Parents of Stuartholme Meeting 6pm
Tues 14 JulyClasses start
Wed 15 JulyCo-curricular photo day
Thurs 16-Fri 17 JulyYear 11 Leadership Days
Tues 21 JulyYr 10 to 11 Parent & Student Subject Info – via Zoom
Wed 22 JulyCentennial Photo
Fri 24 JulyYear 9 Retreat
Wed 29 JulyYear 8 Retreat
Mon 27-Fri 31 JulyYear 10 into 11 SET Plan interviews (offered via zoom or face-to-face)
Wed 5 AugustBook Week Celebration and Harry Potter's birthday (amended activities)
Fri 7 AugustAcademic Assembly
Thurs 13 AugustYear 7 Retreat
Fri 14 AugustRevised Ekka Holiday date
Thurs 20 AugustYear 9 French Immersion afternoon
Fri 21 AugustCross Country
Tues 25 AugustYear 10 immunisations
Sat 12-Sun 13 SeptemberCentennial Art Show
Tues 15 SeptemberRACQ Docudrama
Wed 16 SeptemberYear 8 Arts Fiesta
Friday 18 SeptemberLast day of Term 3

Message from the Deputy Principal

Reflection on a remarkable semester As we come to the end of Semester 1, I cannot help but pause, reflect, and be in awe of …

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Message from the Deputy Principal

Reflection on a remarkable semester

As we come to the end of Semester 1, I cannot help but pause, reflect, and be in awe of the achievements of our community. Over this term, we have witnessed firsthand the generosity of spirit, agility and support of our entire school community that has buoyed us through to the end of the term.

2020 will be remarkable for several reasons, most notably navigating considerable change in such a short period. On the one hand, I feel as though we have lived a full year already in just the last term; however, as I reflect on this term, I am reminded change is also a key indicator of growth. Growth is at times uncomfortable and is not without its challenge. It is through this growth we develop the strength, resilience, and tenacity to keep keeping on. This last term has demonstrated just how much we have grown together as a community. We are stronger through the experiences we have shared.

Supporting your daughter to build a culture of thinking at home

With assessment feedback and Parent/ Student/ Teacher Conferences on the horizon, now is an opportunity to make the learning visible through having discussions with your daughter around her progress. Dr Ron Ritchart provides the following conversation starters for parents that are useful in supporting a culture of thinking within the home (http://www.pz.harvard.edu/resources/9-apps-for-parents):

  1. Name and Notice Thinking

Use the language of thinking to name and notice the thinking your child is using and thus make it more visible. I like how you used what you already know to make connections. That’s a perspective I hadn’t thought about.

  1. Develop a Growth Mindset

Develop a growth mindset in your child by focusing your praise on process, learning, and effort (You really worked hard on this and have learned a lot. You’ve really developed as a musician.), as opposed to ability (You’re so clever. You’re good at Math.)

  1. Challenge but Don’t Rescue

When your child encounters difficulties, don’t jump in and solve the problem and rescue him/her. Instead, ask questions that will help him/her to think through the problem, identify, and choose a course of action to moving forward.

  1. What Questions Did You Ask Today?

Our questions drive us as learners. Instead of asking your child, “Did you learn anything today?”, you could say, “Did you ask a good question today?” This will encourage your child to be more invested in the types of questions they ask at school.

  1. Focus on the Learning Over the Work

Learning is the goal of an assignment. Take a moment to ask your child what the purpose of each homework assignment is, what do they think the teacher wants them to learn and get better at as a result. Then monitor the learning, not the work.

  1. Support Your Child in Arguing Effectively and Persuasively

Research has shown that teenagers who argued constructively with their parents by building a case and providing evidence for their position were more enabled to speak up, voice an opinion, and use evidence in other facets of life.

  1. Provide Time to Pursue Passions

Students need time and space to pursue their passions and interest. Pay attention to your child’s learning and passions outside of school and make time for them.

  1. Make Your Own Thinking Visible

You are a model for your child of what it means to be a thinker and a learner. Model your own interests, passions, curiosity, reflection, learning, and thinking for your child.

  1. What Makes You Say That?

By simply asking, “What makes you say that?”, in a curious and non-judgemental tone after someone has given a response, we are able to get a window into the thinking behind that person’s initial response.

Stuartholme finalist in 2020 Australian Education Awards

I would like to take the opportunity to celebrate the excellent news that Stuartholme School is a finalist in the 2020 Australian Education Awards for Best Professional Learning Program. The Australian Education Awards bring together hundreds of educational leaders from across the country and acknowledge the star performers in the profession. This acknowledgement is a testament to the emphasis Stuartholme School places on staff development – a key indicator for student success. Our relationship with Dr Ron Ritchart and Project Zero at Harvard University has been instrumental in progressing this goal.

 

As we lead into the break, I wish you and your families a safe and happy holiday period. I encourage students to access downtime and take the chance to reboot in preparation for Semester 2.

Best wishes,

Daniel Crump
Deputy Principal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Message from the Dean of Mission

What Makes a School Catholic?  Thomas Groome, professor of Theology at Boston College in the USA, has devoted much time to researching about what makes a school Catholic. …

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Message from the Dean of Mission

What Makes a School Catholic? 

Thomas Groome, professor of Theology at Boston College in the USA, has devoted much time to researching about what makes a school Catholic. In doing so, he names five distinct and inter-related characteristics: 

  1. Its positive anthropology, which recognises the innate dignity and goodness in each person. 
  1. Its sacramental life and the belief that God is present in all things. 
  1. Its communal emphasis and the fact that we are called to live in relationship with each other and all creation. 
  1. Its commitment to tradition and the importance of its story and vision for human life. 
  1. Its appreciation for rationality and learning, epitomised through its commitment to education. 

Hopefully, you can identify these in action through your experience at Stuartholme. 

Goodness & Dignity 

This idea of positive anthropology is built on the fundamental belief that we are made in the image and likeness of God.  For us in Catholic schools, this means that: 

  • we affirm the goodness of all of our students, promote their dignity, honour their fundamental rights, and develop their gifts to the fullest; 
  • we educate them to live responsibly, for the fullness of life that God offers through faith; 
  • we form and mould them to believe that their lives are worthwhile and have significance, and that their every good effort advances the wellbeing of everyone in our community and beyond. 

Our Current Times 

In considering these aspects of what it means to be a part of a Catholic school, I’m drawn to also consider the Black Lives Matter campaign in USA along with the local protests concerning the treatment of indigenous people in Australia and our response as a Catholic school. 

Today at our Assembly we recognised Reconciliation Week and Sorry Day. In doing so, several of our Year 12 girls passionately addressed our community of the need for reconciliation. Nieve Dickman and Maia Craig highlighted: 

Sorry is an acknowledgement of the atrocities that have pervaded our nation’s history and a call to action against those that affect our present society. Sorry is an acknowledgment that we are listening and willing to understand the stories of those that have been brutally impacted by our past – for it is only by listening to those who have been silenced throughout our history that we can amplify – rather than smother – their voices.  

The forced removal of Indigenous children from their families continues to have a lasting and horrific impact on their families, the children themselves and the broader Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. This cannot be ignored.  

Together we must work towards understanding this pain. Together we must listen to the stories of these peoples. Together we must acknowledge the resounding grief felt around us. For if, in our present society, we are to rightly advocate that black lives matter we must first show solidarity in sorrow for the many ‘lives that could have been’ that were taken over 50 years ago during the Stolen Generation. 

While Tillie Alleluia stated: 

this day is not just about acknowledgment, it is not just about saying sorry it is about BEING sorry. We’ve all heard the phrase “an apology is nothing without action,” therefore we must take action. It is not asked of you to apologise for your ancestors, what is asked of you is to dismantle the systems of oppression that stand today. We cannot say we are sorry and continue to let indigenous lives be governed by a system that didn’t take into consideration their culture, history, social structure and way of life.  We must actively work towards making a change. 

Tillie also emphasised the need to be educated on these matters and provided suggestions groups that our students might engage with for this. 

The Gift of a Catholic Education 

In listening to the girls speak today, what really stood out for me is the way that they affirmed the goodness of all people, promoted the dignity of a marginalised culture, highlighted the need for education and the responsibility it brings to take action, and they did so in a way that advanced the wellbeing of all. Through their words and actions, we saw first hand evidence of the goodness that sets us apart as a Catholic and Sacred Heart School. 

To conclude, Maia and Nieve say it best: 

Today, in alignment with our with our Sacred Heart goals, we commit to inviting all in our Christian community into genuine and authentic interpersonal relationships, in which we ‘all may grow together’; we commit to providing a living, dynamic and inclusive culture in which the school nurtures and values each person in our community; we commit, through collaboration and dialogue, to build authentic relationships with our indigenous peoples. We commit to reconciliation. 

Peace and blessings for the weeks ahead. 

Justin Golding
Dean of Mission

  1. Groome.(1996). What Makes a School Catholic? In The Contemporary Catholic School: Context, Identity & Diversity. T. McLaughlin, J. O’Keefe & B. O’Keefe (Eds.). Washington: Falmer Press.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Message from the Dean of Boarding

Dear Parents and Guardians, Well we have almost made it to the end of Term 2, and although I am unsure of what Term 3 …

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Message from the Dean of Boarding

Dear Parents and Guardians,

Well we have almost made it to the end of Term 2, and although I am unsure of what Term 3 will bring I want you to know we have been working hard to bring our whole Boarding community back together. I thank all of our families who were able to be present at our meeting on Thursday evening and I would encourage every one of you to please send in any questions you may have as we want to ensure everyone is fully briefed.

This term, we started with only our 7 International girls and have watched the number grow to our current number of 28 girls. At each step along the way we have seen a gradual increase in the energy around the House and during this time the need for Recreation activities has been paramount. These activities have provided opportunities for the girls to share in some fun, in the face of ‘social distancing’. I do wonder if our life will return to what it was before, or will we now live in a ‘new’ way? You will see in the pictorial of the term that the girls had an Easter moment, celebrating to a wistful ‘We miss you all’ . What started as small group gathering around the fire pit on Friday gradually increased to more and more, not to mention the dumpling making and pizza eating that was going on. Life is slowly returning to what we knew before and I was very happy to allow the International girls to have an outing to our local shops following 12 weeks on the hill with no leave. Thankfully those girls who have returned recently have been more than happy that some our restrictions have been slightly eased to allow the girls to go for a run down to the Bardon corner store, or for a walk with others to Slaughter Falls, or even to host their family here on the hill.

It has been wonderful that Claire Lawler has continued with her Academic tutoring similar to what we would normally have had in the House on a Tuesday and Thursday. This has supported a number of our girls studying both from home and here in the Boarding House. Claire has been very flexible in communicating with the girls via Zoom early in the term and now by appointment for those girls still at home. I know this week has been an intensive time in regards to Assessment Tasks for our junior and Year 11 girls. I certainly hope they will receive lots of positive feedback from this unusual term of learning. I believe the girls are a credit to themselves, and I have been so proud of my own Boarding students who have remained faithful to all their class work and attendance in Zoom lessons this term. We will be returning back to our routine of two supervised study times on Monday and Thursday while Sport will also be available throughout the week and the girls will be able to apply for leave.

Yesterday we received word from the Metro North Public Health Unit that our Risk Management Plan was accepted with no further recommendations. This will allow us to return in Term 3 with 50% of our Boarders back in the House. It is our aim to increase that number steadily from 50 % to 75% to 100%, by the middle Term 3.

I would strongly encourage all girls at home to make the effort to connect with us during our last Monday night House Meeting at 6pm which hopefully will provide a little light relief in these trying times. It is a great way to see who of their friends have returned but to also keep up to date with any new endeavours that we are working on.

Please contact me if you have any questions about this time of COVID-19, I have just accepted that it is movable feast, and I am looking forward to returning to a more normal world, as I am sure you are as well.

Take care and be well,

Karen Davies
Dean of Boarding

Click on a photo to start gallery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Message from the Dean of Student Wellbeing

Your example, even more than your words, will be an eloquent lesson to the world. – Madeleine Sophie Barat Being respectful One of the areas …

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Message from the Dean of Student Wellbeing

Your example, even more than your words, will be an eloquent lesson to the world. – Madeleine Sophie Barat

Being respectful

One of the areas of my job I enjoy the most is working proactively with the students to support their development of skills to assist them both now and in the future.

Last Thursday, I had the great pleasure of working alongside Ms Meehan, Mr Crump and the Year 11 Wise Wellness Teachers facilitating a workshop with the Year 11 Cohort designed to challenge them to think deeply about the concept and role of a Stuartholme leader.

The Year 11s enthusiastically participated in a process whereby we unpacked what it means to enact the Stuartholme Student Positive Expectations which are framed by the Sacred Heat Educational Goals and centre on respect.

Building Respectful Relationships

Building respectful relationships is also a key focus in our Wise Wellness Program delivered across Years 7-12. To support our work at school through our partnership with parents, I am delighted to provide advice from our school psychologists Ms Eloise Conrad and Ms Natalie Morgan who contribute in a significant way to the creation of the ‘Stuartholme Village’.

It is critical that young people develop the skills to build healthy, respectful relationships with others. The adults in their lives play a key role in modelling and teaching young people what a respectful relationship looks like. This includes fostering supportive friendships and managing conflict situations appropriately.

The following are some key indicators for the development and maintenance of healthy relationships with others:

  • Active listening skills: Young people seeking to understand their friends’ needs, wants and points of views as well as looking to support and care for that person. Active listening involves not only providing time to stop and pay attention to our friends but also to aim to understand what they are thinking and feeling. One simple way this can be achieved is by repeating back what our friends tell us and check we’ve understood, rather than rushing to fix a problem.
  • Empathy: A young person’s ability to empathise assists greatly in the building of relationships with others. Contemporary researchers often differentiate between two types of empathy: “Affective empathy” is the feeling we get in response to others’ emotions; this can include mirroring what that person is feeling. “Cognitive empathy,” sometimes called “perspective taking,” refers to our ability to identify and understand other people’s emotions.
  • Careful use of humour: A common defence of young people is “it was just a joke”. When using humour, it is important for young people to understand that they need to be sensitive to others’ feelings when telling jokes to avoid embarrassing their friend or making them feel small.
  • Communicating directly: When there is a conflict, it is critical to approach the person directly and having an assertive conversation after everyone has cooled down. This is often one of the most difficult skills to build and action for young people (and adults!), and it becomes easier to speak behind the other person’s back. A simple template for an assertive conversation: “I feel____when you___in the future I would like____”.
  • “The vault”: “What I share with you in confidence, you don’t share with other people” – Brene Brown. Trust is a fundamental part of respectful relationships and is made up of small moments. The more often young people can show their friends that they are trustworthy by avoiding the temptation to gossip, the more that they will be able to display honesty and behave how they would like to be treated.

If your daughter is unsure whether her friendships are healthy ones, here are some questions she can ask herself: “Do I feel safe?” “Do I feel appreciated?” “Have they got my best interests at heart?” “Do I feel supported?” “Are they willing to listen when I have a concern?”.

For further information or support, please contact our school psychologists, Eloise Conrad (econrad@stuartholme.com) and Natalie Morgan (nmorgan@stuartholme.com) or your daughter’s Leader of Student Wellbeing.

References: Kids Helpline (https://kidshelpline.com.au), ReachOut (https://au.reachout.com/), Greater Good Science Center (https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/) and Brene Brown (book “Dare to Lead”).

Helpful contacts over the break

As the term wraps up and your daughter embarks on the holiday period, it is a great opportunity for her to recharge her batteries and relax.

I hope that you have a restful time together with your families and the chance to unwind and enjoy some downtime free from the technology which has characterised this term of school.

I encourage you to visit the Wellbeing tile in the parent portal on My Stuartholme where we have established a range of helpful contacts for parents to access if you require further support.

Deborah Lonsdale-Walker
Dean of Student Wellbeing

 

 

 

 

 

 

Message from the Careers Counsellor

Hi everyone, Hope you’re all having a great end of term. I can’t quite believe how quickly these last few weeks have gone! It’s been …

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Message from the Careers Counsellor

Hi everyone,

Hope you’re all having a great end of term. I can’t quite believe how quickly these last few weeks have gone!

It’s been wonderful to be back onsite, working with students in classes and seeing a lot of students for individual careers counselling sessions.

What’s coming up?

  • 17-21 June: Virtual Careers Expo – because it’s not possible to visit universities in person this year, I’d encourage students in Year 10, 11 and 12 to attend this expo to talk to different institutions about interests and options.
  • 24 June: Mock UCAT test – I’ll be running a practice UCAT test for Year 12 students who will be sitting the UCAT in July. Students have been doing a great job preparing!
  • 23 July: QTAC speaker via Zoom – Year 12 students and parents will be invited to join us for a QTAC presentation. A QTAC representative will explain the application process and be available to answer all of your questions. More details will be shared shortly.
  • 4 August: QTAC, UAC, VTAC open for applications – a very exciting time!
  • 30 September: Year 12 students aim to have TAC application(s) in – students can still change their preferences after this date.

 

Please find below a summary of key information and events that you and your daughters may be interested in.

Warm regards,

Tom Lillyman
Careers Counsellor

Exploring

Beyond QCE: Virtual Careers Expo

Because it’s not possible to visit universities in person this year, you might like to attend this virtual expo to talk to different institutions about your interests and options. All the big Queensland universities will be there, plus some other big universities from other states. Click here to learn more and register.

ACU: Talk with industry series

Join ACU for at one of the Talk with Industry events. They are a series of webinar panel discussions featuring ACU graduates across a range of different professions. Get helpful advice and find out what it’s really like to work in your area of interest. Join the webinars to hear from ACU graduates about their work experiences and get tips and advice for pursuing a career in your area of interest.

  • Talk with Occupational Therapists and Speech Pathologists – Wed, 17 June at 5.00pm
  • Talk with Exercise Scientists and Physiotherapists – Wed, 1 July at 6.00pm
  • Talk with Nurses, Midwives & Paramedics – Thurs, 17 Sept at 5.00pm

Griffith Uni: Elite Athlete Webinar

On Thursday, June 18, 4.30-6.00pm, students can join Griffith’s Sports College to learn more about going to university while continuing to play sport at a competitive level.

This event is designed specifically for students of Years 10-12 and their families and will provide information on:

  • Elite athlete support at Griffith
  • Sports scholarship opportunities for 2021
  • Gaining entry to the Sports College post COVID-19, with limited competition during 2020

To register, click here!

Applying

Early Entry Schemes

Some universities offer early entry programs for Year 12 students. Offers are usually made much earlier than the QTAC major offer rounds (December and January). Read more about each program by visiting the links below:

University of New England (UNE) Early Entry Program

ACU Community Achiever Program

Sunshine Coast University Early Offer Guarantee Program

University of Southern Queensland Early Offer Guarantee Program

Southern Cross University STAR Program

ACU Passion for Business Program

ACU Passion for Law Program (NB: ACU will offer Bachelor of Laws + double degrees at their Brisbane campus from 2021)

Students who are interested in studying in NSW are also encouraged to check out the UAC School Recommendation Scheme, which offers early entry to many universities in NSW.

Griffith: Guarantee Admission Scheme

The Guarantee Admission Scheme has three different categories:

  • Guarantee Admissions Scheme – ATAR 90+/IB 33+
    • This category recognises your performance and guarantees entry to a set of competitive and high demand undergraduate degrees.
  • Guarantee Admissions Scheme – ATAR 80+?IB 28+
    • This category recognises your achievements and guarantees entry to a wide range of creative, generalist and professional undergraduate degrees.
  • Guarantee Admissions Scheme – VET
    • This category recognises your capabilities and guarantees entry to a set of undergraduate degrees that build on your vocational skills if you have completed Certificate lll or lV or Diploma level study,

Visit the website to learn more!

Scholarships

Become Rewarded Scholarships

The University of Southern Queensland’s Become Rewarded Scholarships are back. The suite of scholarships applies to high-achieving Year 12 students who list USQ as their number-one preference on their QTAC application. The scholarships are available to school leavers studying full-time at any USQ campus in Semester 1, 2021. The scholarships are:

The  Chancellor’s Excellence Scholarship valued up to $29,000- For students awarded an ATAR 97 or above who order USQ as first preference on their QTAC application.

The  Vice-Chancellor’s Scholarship valued up to $20,000 – For students awarded an ATAR 88 or above who order USQ as first preference on their QTAC application.

The  Executive Dean’s Scholarship valued up to $6,000 – For students awarded an ATAR 84 or above who order USQ as first preference on their QTAC application.

UQ Sporting scholarships

2021 UQ Sporting Scholarship applications will be open from Tuesday 4 August to Saturday 31 October 2020. Be prepared! For further information on UQ Sporting Scholarships email sportscholarship@uqsport.com.au.

University of New South Wales (UNSW) Co-op Scholarship Program

The UNSW Co-op Program is a scholarship that incorporates industry experience, leadership and professional development, networking and mentoring. It is open to high achieving students studying in the fields of business, technology, engineering, science, building and construction. It is worth $19,600 per year for up to four or five years (depending on your). Applications are now open and close on 30 September. See more information here.

Robertson Scholars Leadership Program Scholarships

Each year up to two Australian students are selected to complete the four-year undergraduate degree, Robertson Scholars Leadership Program scholarship at Duke University or the University of North Carolina in the United States. The scholarship provides for full tuition fees, accommodation expenses and other costs associated with undertaking a degree abroad. Australian selections are organised through the University of New South Wales (UNSW). Applications open in August.

 

 

 

Co-curricular News

We’re back in rehearsals! Our Stuartholme musicians are back and making beautiful sounds around our Music Department and school facilities. Due to restrictions, the large …

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Co-curricular News

We’re back in rehearsals!

Our Stuartholme musicians are back and making beautiful sounds around our Music Department and school facilities. Due to restrictions, the large ensembles have been creative with rehearsal locations. Many thanks to all the parents for supporting the musicians and music staff throughout the last term and we look forward to further creative opportunities next semester.

Check out the great video of the girls back in rehearsal here.

August Ensemble Workshops and Performance

Despite the cancellation of the Queensland Catholic Colleges and Schools Music Festival this year, the Stuartholme Music Workshops will still go ahead in August. On Friday 7 August, the Choirs Workshop will take place from 3.45 – 6.45pm and on Sunday the 9 August the Instrumental Workshops will take place for the Bands from 9.00am – 1.00pm and Strings from 10.00am – 3.00pm. At the conclusion of the workshops a short performance will be presented (restrictions pending) for our school community.

Return of Representative Sport

The long anticipated return to the representative school sport program has arrived. As of 4.00pm yesterday afternoon, the Director General – Department of Education, has announced that the department will recommence a staged reintroduction of school sport from term 3 2020. From 10 July 2020, in line with the Queensland Government’s Stage 3 easing of restrictions, the representative school sport program for both outdoor and indoor sports can begin. Selected state championships, regional trials and district trials will take place in term 3 and term 4 2020. The Department of Education has worked closely with stakeholders to recommence sports and the return to play plan aligns with the latest Queensland Government Roadmap to easing Queensland’s restrictions https://www.covid19.qld.gov.au/government-actions/roadmap-to-easing-queenslands-restrictions released on the 31 May 2020, the AIS Framework for Rebooting Sport in a COVID 19 Environment https://ais.gov.au/health-wellbeing/covid-19 and the Return to Play Guide for Queensland sport, recreation and fitness industries https://www.covid19.qld.gov.au/government-actions/roadmap-to-easing-queenslands-restrictions/sport .

All the information about the reboot of the representative school sport program is on the Queensland School Sport website. https://queenslandschoolsport.education.qld.gov.au/

A calendar of Qld School Sport State Championships events for the remainder of 2020 can be located on the Queensland School Sport website. https://queenslandschoolsport.education.qld.gov.au/aboutUs/eventsCalendar/Documents/interim-state-calendar.pdf

There are 18 QSS state championships listed. There will be no Qld School Sport Cross Country or Track and Field State Championship this year. The Metropolitan West School Sport Board will conduct regional trials to select teams to attend the updated 2020 QSS state championships events. MWSS will not be conducting regional cross country or regional track & field trials in 2020 due to the Qld Government’s stage 3 COVID 19 restrictions.

The Metropolitan West School Sport office will distribute an updated 2020 MWSS Regional School Sport calendar once we have venues confirmed for the remaining regional trials. We are ready to go, but please be mindful that a lot of the venues we use for our regional trials are working diligently to ensure that they are following the new government regulations to ensure a safe playing environment for our students. We are all going to need to exercise our patience’s in this area while working with our sporting community, which in a majority of cases are run by volunteers.

We anticipate releasing a new calendar over the coming week.

Please refer to the Frequently Asked Questions on the Queensland School Sport website for return to sport requirements. https://queenslandschoolsport.education.qld.gov.au/sportsInformation/Documents/rebooting-school-sport-faq.pdf

Science Snippets

UQ set for a sustainable future The University of Queensland (UQ) is set to become the first major university in the world to have 100 …

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Science Snippets

UQ set for a sustainable future

The University of Queensland (UQ) is set to become the first major university in the world to have 100 per cent of its electricity consumption sourced from its own solar power farms. UQ currently has a solar farm at UQ Gatton Campus with 37 000 solar panels, and is nearing completion on another 220,000 panel farm.

The facility aims to make the University energy neutral by the end of 2020 and will also be home to a flock of sheep who will live harmoniously alongside the panels. The sheep will graze on the grass around the panels, keeping maintenance costs low.

“The 64 megawatt (MW) solar farm located just outside of Warwick, on Queensland’s Southern Downs, will provide research, teaching and engagement opportunities in addition to its environmental and financial benefits,” UQ Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Peter Høj said.

The farm is built on a 150-hectare property in Warwick and will generate roughly 154,000 megawatt hours of clean energy each year. That’s enough to power 27,000 average homes!

As for the sheep, they seem to love living in the fields with the solar panels. They even take naps under the shade of the panels on hot days.

The solar farm is a bright step towards a sustainable future for Queensland and Australia, and is one of the many ways UQ is taking steps towards building a more sustainable future.

By Annella Casey (Year 11 UQ Science Ambassador)

Sources

https://giving.uq.edu.au/stories/100-cent-renewable-energy-uq-sets-new-standard

https://www.uq.edu.au/news/article/2018/06/uq-set-world-standard-100-cent-renewable-energy

Science competition opportunities:

o Australian Physics Olympiad

o Australian Chemistry Olympiad

o Australian Biology Olympiad

Science camps and ‘schools’:

o Australian Science Olympiads Summer School for Physics ANU

o AMOC School of Excellence (Uni Melb) (training camps)

o UQ Junior Physics Olympiad Camp

o Informatics Summer School

Please be mindful that some of the above are still to be confirmed and /or may be cancelled due to COVID-19. Any questions, please get in touch wmacdonald@stuartholme.com

Kind regards,

Wendy Macdonald
Leader of Learning – Science

 

Social Justice News

We understand that we will never understand. Although Wednesday, 3rd June saw the closing of National Reconciliation Week, Social Justice and Mission at Stuartholme facilitated …

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Social Justice News

We understand that we will never understand.

Although Wednesday, 3rd June saw the closing of National Reconciliation Week, Social Justice and Mission at Stuartholme facilitated the opportunity for our community to reflect on historical and current events surrounding our First Nation People through a Sorry Day liturgy.  The poignant coincidence of the Black Lives Matter movement gaining awareness during National Reconciliation Week was clearly noted by our students. Below are the reflections of JPIC Committee members Maia Craig and Nieve Dickman and the call the action from Tilie Allelulia, Multicultural captain, which were presented during our Sorry Day liturgy.

Maia Craig and Nieve Dickman – Year 12 – JPIC Committee

National Sorry Day is a day to remember the forced removal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals during the Stolen Generations; to remember the irrevocable loss of language, loss of culture, and loss of family that stained our country’s past and continues to both directly and indirectly impact the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of this nation. It is a day to take responsibility and express sorrow for the intergenerational trauma that occurred, and understand that trauma through the stories of those who survived it. It is a day to acknowledge that while we will never be able to conceptualise the pain that the Indigenous communities have endured, we will try, and we will listen, and we will stand together.

National reconciliation week is a moment for all of Australia to stand in solidarity with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of this nation and to uncover the contribution we can all have towards reconciliation and healing. The anniversary of two critical events in our nation’s reconciliation journey are held throughout this week. It marks the 1967 referendum in which our First Nations became legally regarded as people, and were finally given the right to vote in their own country as well as the High Court Mabo Decision, which recognised the rights Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have to their land as the traditional owners before British colonisation.

National Sorry Day itself marks the anniversary of the Bringing Them Home Report being tabled in parliament. This report condemned the events that occurred during the Stolen Generations and outlined 54 recommendations to support national healing and reconciliation, of which many have still not been implemented.

Today, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are 10.6 times more likely to be removed from their families than non-Indigenous children. Furthermore, many of the 54 recommendations of The Bringing Them Home Report are unfulfilled, compensation for the harms of the Stolen Generations are inadequate, and constant and immense discrimination is faced by our First Nations. In alignment with our sacred heart goals of dignity of the human person and solidarity we all have a responsibility to work towards an Australia where its First Peoples are treated with the justice and integrity they deserve, and where their voices are heard. Madeleine Sophie Barat taught us to treat everyone – especially those who have been marginalised – with compassion. With the privilege we have to attend such an incredible school and have access to such abundant resources, we have a responsibility to stand by our First Nations in both closing the gap and working towards reconciliation. For as stated by St Madeleine Sophie Barat, we must show others ‘by the care with which you help them to advance along every line for which you are responsible’.

In order to achieve this Australia and combat the abhorrent treatment of Indigenous Australians we need to start with taking accountability.

The theme for this year’s National Reconciliation Week is In This Together – a message that has now taken on an even greater meaning as we are faced with the effects of a global pandemic and one which has been guiding Australia’s journey towards a more reconciled, equitable and fair nation for the past 20 years.

Sorry is an acknowledgement of the atrocities that have pervaded our nation’s history and a call to action against those that affect our present society. Sorry is an acknowledgment that we are listening and willing to understand the stories of those that have been brutally impacted by our past – for it is only by listening to those who have been silenced throughout our history that we can amplify – rather than smother – their voices.

The forced removal of Indigenous children from their families continues to have a lasting and horrific impact on their families, the children themselves and the broader Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. This cannot be ignored.

Together we must work towards understanding this pain. Together we must listen to the stories of these peoples. Together we must acknowledge the resounding grief felt around us. For if, in our present society, we are to rightly advocate that black lives matter we must first show solidarity in sorrow for the many ‘lives that could have been’ that were taken over 50 years ago during the Stolen Generation.

Today, in alignment with our with our sacred heart goals, we commit to inviting all in our Christian community into genuine and authentic interpersonal relationships, in which we ‘all may grow together’; we commit to providing a living, dynamic and inclusive culture in which the school nurtures and values each person in our community; we commit, through collaboration and dialogue, to build authentic relationships with our indigenous peoples. We commit to reconciliation.

Tilie Alleluia – Year 12 – Multicultural Captain

Today on National sorry day we acknowledge the injustices inflicted on our Indigenous people at the hands of colonisation and at the hands of modern systematic racism. However, this day is not just about acknowledgment, it is not just about saying sorry it is about BEING sorry.

We’ve all heard the phrase “an apology is nothing without action,” therefore we must take action. It is not asked of you to apologise for your ancestors, what is asked of you is to dismantle the systems of oppression that stand today. We cannot say we are sorry and continue to let Indigenous lives be governed by a system that didn’t take into consideration their culture, history, social structure and way of life.  We must actively work towards making a change.

Unfortunately, racism is a universal evil and the common denominator is that across cultures melanin has become connoted with inferiority, the education, employment, life expectancy and health outcomes of black people around the world are a clear indicator of this. It is not enough to not be racist you must be anti-racist as neutrality is a win for the oppressor.

It is imperative that we treat our neighbours as Jesus taught us to, with dignity, compassion and love, therefore it is our job to be active change agents. And I know that you’re probably thinking that your means to help are pretty limited, but I can assure you every action counts.

 The first thing you can do is donate. Donate to the legal costs of the inquiries of Indigenous families who are trying to find answers as to why their loved ones died in police custody.

 Secondly, support Indigenous businesses and social enterprises which the multicultural committee will make accessible to you. Furthermore, get involved by joining a social justice group like JPIC or even an external group which can be discovered through social media. You could even help by even telling Stuartholme what you think should be a part of their Reconciliation Action Plan. And lastly and most importantly, get educated.

 You cannot fight for an issue that you do not understand. There are various social media pages you can follow to gain an understanding, some of these will be included in student notices or even posted around the school.

 So, there you have it, now you are aware of the ways in which you can make a difference and now the ball is in your court. I saw an extremely fitting quote the other day that read “if you’ve ever wondered what you would’ve done during the civil rights movement, now’s the time to show it,” this is our civil rights movement. What part will you play in this history?

 Auslan

 

Auslan demo

This term Stuartholme students from Year 7 to 12 have been learning Auslan, otherwise known as Australian sign language. Initially our lessons were conducted via Zoom, and now we are learning in person (our Boarders still join us via Zoom). Together we are covering the foundations of handshapes, fingerspelling, greetings, pronouns, relationships, conversation starters, the importance of non-verbal signals and grammar. Further to this the class also covers hearing impaired culture, all in an aim to create accessibility and inclusion. Over the holidays our Auslan students will help create a Stuartholme sign bank, which will allow easier revision for current students and the opportunity for new students to catch up on established content so they could join us for classes in Term 3.  If you are interested in learning Auslan, please email clawler@stuartholme.com

 

Image – Stu Case Rummage Publish

 

Our Justice Peace and Integrity of Creation (JPIC) club are still collecting donations for Stu Case Rummage. These donations will be used to create and manage our own Op Shop during the first few weeks of Term 3. The opportunity encourages Stuartholme students to engage in business practices, whilst being aware of consumer patterns, the effects of fast fashion and how even through our clothing choices we can be sustainable and ethical. With an estimate 500, 000 tonnes of clothing and leather being sent to Australian landfill each year, we have a responsibility as Stewards of Creation, to care for not only the earth but those who will be effected by our negligence. Donations will be open until the end of Week 1, Term 3. Remember for each item donated, one house point will be awarded.

 

Image – Stu Case Rummage – House Points Update

Sr Kiran teaches students to make dahl

On Wednesday, Sr Kiran, who is visiting Stuartholme from India, joined students in the kitchen and shared with them how to real Indian dahl. It …

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Sr Kiran teaches students to make dahl

On Wednesday, Sr Kiran, who is visiting Stuartholme from India, joined students in the kitchen and shared with them how to real Indian dahl. It was a wonderful (and delicious!) experience for the students and we are so grateful to Sr Kiran for sharing this skill with us.

Click on a photo to start gallery

 

 

 

Bus Network

With Term 2 finishing next Friday 19 June at 12noon, the buses will depart school at 12.15pm. Term 3 buses will operate from the morning …

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Bus Network

With Term 2 finishing next Friday 19 June at 12noon, the buses will depart school at 12.15pm.

Term 3 buses will operate from the morning of Tuesday 14 July.  If your daughter will need the bus in Term 3 and does not have an Annual Pass, a Term 2 & 3 Pass, or a Casual Pass, please pay and register for Term 3 here:

https://stuartholme.com/our-community/bus-network/

Honour Pockets in Term 3

The Honour Pockets Committee is pleased to have confirmed the 2020 criteria.  The criteria handbook is available on My Stuartholme in the Co-Curricular folder. As …

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Honour Pockets in Term 3

The Honour Pockets Committee is pleased to have confirmed the 2020 criteria.  The criteria handbook is available on My Stuartholme in the Co-Curricular folder. As in 2019, all students who are eligible for an Honour Pocket Award will receive an email invitation in Week 1 Term 3 from Student Wellbeing Office.

All achievements through the school pathway will be captured by the heads of each department so students do not need to apply for these Awards. However, students are then invited in Week 2 Term 3 to apply for Special Awards relating to co curricula activities not recognised through the school and that fit within the selection criteria for 2020.

If your daughter is eligible for a Special Award (which includes service awards), she needs to complete the Special Awards application form after it is emailed to her and have the teacher-in-charge sign and return it to Mrs Blazak by 9.00am on Monday, 24 August 2020.  Blazers need to be handed in to the Uniform shop on Friday, 28 August 2020.

HONOUR POCKET COMMITTEE 2020

Refer a Student and help us build our community

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Refer a Student and help us build our community

School Shop

Just a reminder to please check you have purchased the correct size before you write your daughter’s name on an item. Unfortunately, items that have …

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School Shop

Just a reminder to please check you have purchased the correct size before you write your daughter’s name on an item.

Unfortunately, items that have been named cannot be exchanged or refunded as they are deemed to be second hand.

 

Centenary book and merchandise

To commemorate our centenary in 2020 Stuartholme invites you to purchase our  ‘Celebrating 100 years’ book. This beautiful, limited edition, hardcover book follows the history …

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Centenary book and merchandise

To commemorate our centenary in 2020 Stuartholme invites you to purchase our  ‘Celebrating 100 years’ book.

This beautiful, limited edition, hardcover book follows the history of Stuartholme from humble beginnings, through to the school we know and love today.

Books can still be purchased for the early bird price of $69.95 (plus postage if needed).

Click here to purchase.

100 Year Merchandise

To celebrate our centenary we have commissioned a small range of memorabilia available for sale. The items are now available for sale at the School Shop. To view the items, please click here.

Centenary fine chain necklace – $41.60
Solid silver bracelet – $53
Centennial pin – $4
Stuartholme tea towels – $5 each or 3 for $10.