Message from the Principal

Dear Parents, Caregivers and Friends,

Today we celebrated our patron saint’s Feast Day, St Madeleine Sophie Barat.

We warmly welcomed: Sr Rita Carroll rscJ, Sr Genny Bannon rscJ, Leaders from Duchesne College at UQ, parents and families of the 2018 Ribbon recipients, staff and students.

Madeleine Sophie Barat was born in Joigny, Burgundy, France in 1779. She was highly educated, beyond what was normal for a woman of her time.

Sophie’s education was rigorous, rigid and unforgiving. Yet she started a style of education built on good relationships – based on patience, compassion and openness. How do we express this lesson? I often say “Stuartholme is an academic school, yet never at the expense of our girls’ wellbeing”.

Sophie’s early experience of religion was also harsh – where God was portrayed as a strict judge, condemning sinners. Yet Sophie inspired a Catholic ethos built on the love of Jesus. Her own spirituality was expressed through her friendships and drawing out the best in others.

Sophie transformed her rigorous education into a highly relational style of education.

Sophie transformed her harsh religious upbringing into a compassionate and empowering spirituality.

Sophie transformed her early negative experiences into positive and purposeful ways forward for herself and for us.

Today we celebrate Sophie’s legacies:

  • Our Sacred Heart style of education which ensures both the head and heart work in unison
  • Our Sacred Heart spirituality which ensures we are compassionate to others and empower us to be the best we can be.

Kristen Sharpe,
Principal

Key Dates

view ARTICLE

Key Dates

DateEvent
Fri 25 MayFeast of St Madeleine Sophie Barat. Madeleine Sophie Day Mass and Celebrations
Alumnae Awards and Cocktail Evening
Sun 27 MayAlumnae Mass & Reunion morning tea
Interhouse Solo Music Awards
Mon 28 MayNational Sorry Day Liturgy
Thurs 31 MayYears 7-9 Parent Session - Effective Test Preparation. 7-7.45pm, R101-R102
Tues 5 JuneYear 10 Parent Information Night - New QCE System 7pm, Theatre
Wed 6 JuneInterhouse Athletics Carnival
Thurs 7-Thurs 14 JuneYear 11 assessment block
Fri 8-Thurs 14 JuneYear 12 assessment block
Fri 15 JuneInterhouse Choral Competition
Mon 18-Wed 20 JuneYear 11 Leadership Days
Mon 18-Tue 19 JuneYear 12 QCS practice test
Wed 20 JuneYear 12 photo
Thurs 21 JuneYears 7-9 Parent Daughter Breakfast
Year 11 Harmony Day
Classes finish
Fri 22 JuneBoarders travel day
Year 12 Formal

Message from the Deputy Principal

Exam preparation As we come to the end of Week 6, many students will find themselves busy with assessment but may not have yet given …

view ARTICLE

Message from the Deputy Principal

Exam preparation

As we come to the end of Week 6, many students will find themselves busy with assessment but may not have yet given a lot of thought to the examinations looming in Weeks 8, 9 and 10. Whilst your daughters may argue that exams are still two weeks’ away, now is actually the time to encourage them to begin their exam revision routine. Being well prepared for examinations is the best way to increase confidence and reduce anxiety, however, research also shows value in giving students time to practise the skills they have learned. When practice is spaced out over time, Researcher John Hattie found that students improved their results by 26% (Killian 2015).

Unfortunately, for a variety of reasons, many students try to learn the facts, concepts, skills or procedures needed for an examination the night before.  Many argue that cramming keeps the information fresh and that studying the night before is actually more effective.  Whilst this may appear to be the case in the short term, over the longer term it will not facilitate the desired levels of success because a single study session, no longer how long it goes for, does not support long term learning.

Importantly for our girls in Years 7 to 10, crammed examination preparation will not prepare them for the types of assessment contained within the senior system they will soon enter. In the new QCE, which will be implemented from 2019 with Year 11, external examinations in some subject areas will assess content covered over Units 3 and 4 (i.e. up to 2 semesters of learning). Cramming the night before, or even a couple of days before, will not allow students to retain that amount of understandings or practise the variety of skills developed over the learning period.

Research shows that spaced practice can assist in improving students’ memory for essential facts and concepts and prior knowledge facilitates subsequent learning and comprehension. Long term retention of foundational knowledge and quick access to information from memory are often prerequisites for higher order learning and reasoning. For example, remembering arithmetic facts (e.g. times tables) is crucial to mathematical skill learning, and being able to retrieve an answer from memory enables efficient problem solving and more complex learning. Retention of information also allows students to transfer and utilise what they have learned (Kang 2016).

Spacing out study and practice is a good habit to build for academic success. However, students should also remember to seek feedback from their teachers and double check their understandings. Timely feedback on practice remediates student misunderstandings and prevents them learning and repeating mistakes.

As we approach our end of semester exams, the following list provides some practical ways parents can support their daughter:

  • Encourage her to use the assessment planners on My Stuartholme, and for seniors the exam timetables when they’re released, to set up a study timetable. Get your daughter to write down the exams she has and the days they are scheduled. Help her to organise her study accordingly. She may want to give some exams more study time than others so help her determine what she needs for each subject.
  • Encourage her to get rid of all distractions when studying and choose a spot where she is able to focus as much as possible.
  • Challenge her to start her study by writing down everything she knows about the topic. Then she can highlight where the gaps lie and use her class notes or research to fill them. This also provides an opportunity to liaise with teachers and correct misconceptions or clarify understandings.
  • Suggest to your daughter that she uses visual aids or diagrams to represent her information. Educational expert Robert Marzano found that deeper levels of understanding can be attained by using graphic organisers to show how different ideas are related to each other (e.g. steps, cause-effect, hierarchy, lists, comparisons, etc.)
  • If available, make use of revision sheets, past papers, practice questions etc. These help to commit the content to memory but, importantly, they allow students to practise the skills (e.g. analysis, applying knowledge to unseen problems) that will be assessed.
  • Support your daughters to ensure they maintain healthy habits including by taking lots of breaks, drinking plenty of water, getting lots of sleep and eating well. These things are vital for brain function and assessment success.

Exam periods can be stressful but spacing out study and practice, seeking feedback and clarification from teachers and implementing effective study tips can all help to reduce anxiety and build success.

Kang, Sean H. K. (2016) “Spaced Repetition Promotes Efficient and Effective Learning: Policy Implications for Instruction”, Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Vol. 3(1) 12–19
Killian, Shaun (2015) “8 Strategies Robert Marzano & John Hattie Agree On” in The Australian Society for evidence based teaching.
Rawson, K.A. & Kintsch, W (2005) “Rereading effects depend on time of test” in Journal of Educational Psychology, Vol 97 (1) 70-80.

Study skills sessions – Years 7, 8, 9

Michael Elliott, our Director of Junior Studies, has been running lunch time sessions with students in Years 7, 8 and 9 to reinforce effective approaches to preparing for tests and exams. We were delighted to see over 30 girls at this week’s session.  There will be another session next Tuesday at 12.35 p.m. in R102. All students in Years 7 to 9 are welcome to attend and I would encourage them to start picking up the tips and skills they will need for success in the new senior system.

A follow up parent session on helping your daughters to study effectively is planned for Thursday 31 May. Further information will be emailed to parents shortly.

Queensland’s new senior system

As you would be aware, Queensland is introducing a new Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE) system, starting with Year 11 students in 2019.

To ensure parents, receive as much information as possible about the change, Year 10 parents are invited to an information night on Tuesday 5 June from 7-8pm. Held in Stuartholme’s Theatre, the night will provide an overview of:

  • The new Queensland Certificate of Education and how it will work
  • ATAR eligibility
  • Queensland Tertiary Admissions Centre advice
  • How Stuartholme has been preparing students and staff for the new system.

Also attending on the night will be Shannon Lacey, Senior Studies Director and Ken Turnbull, Acting Careers Advisor.

Although planning has been underway for well over a year, it is only recently that schools have received enough information that allows us to provide correct and up to date information to parents.

I look forward to seeing as many parents as possible on the night and we will endeavour to film the presentation for boarder families who are unable to attend.

Deanne Johnston,
Deputy Principal

Message from the Dean of Mission

Today we honour St.Madeleine Sophie Barat, the foundress of the Society of the Sacred Heart.  We honour her because we are the recipients of Madeleine …

view ARTICLE

Message from the Dean of Mission

Today we honour St.Madeleine Sophie Barat, the foundress of the Society of the Sacred Heart.  We honour her because we are the recipients of Madeleine Sophie’s vision. She dreamed of an education that challenged and nourished both the minds and the hearts of its pupils, so that their lives would be expressions of God’s love and ultimately work to transform the world.

A tradition on her Feast Day Mass is for the Cor Unum Captain to give a reflection on Madeleine Sophie. This year, Sithara-Anne French delivered a speech that shows just how powerful and inspiring Madeleine Sophie’s vision still is for our community.

Growing up I don’t think that I was ever more scared of anything in my life than I was of fire. I

was so scared of fire that until I was fourteen I couldn’t even light a match. For a long time I tried

to understand why I couldn’t just overcome this fear and be comfortable around fire like

everyone else. But what I have discovered is that fire is such a strange thing. In fact it’s such a

sad thing because I have always associated it with destruction. The reason being is that fire, is

a force of nature. To put it in perspective, a wildfire can reach a maximum speed of 16 km/hour

which doesn’t really sound like much. However, when left to its own devices a wildfire starting at

Stuartholme could spread to Bundaberg in the space of 24 hours. In 2009 the Victorian

bushfires raged on for 7 days, spread over 1, 100, 000 acres and killed 173 people. I think that

this is why fire scared me so much when I was little. It’s powerful, dangerous and can so easily

get out of control.

Now I need to relate this back to St Madeleine Sophie Barat, after all today is her day. But I’m

not going to do this by telling you that Madeleine Sophie was a fire of change or that she was a

flame of hope for female education. Whilst all of these things are true, I want to put a bit of a

different spin on the usual fire metaphor. I’ll start this by saying that Sophie’s childhood was the

equivalent to my worst nightmare. Sophie was born during the French revolution, a time when

people were accustomed to the fire of burning houses nearby. In fact, fire was such a normal

part of everyday life that the trauma of a burning building next door caused Sophie’s mother to

give birth to her two months early.

I want you take for a moment this symbol of fire and think about how destructive it can be. How

scary it can be. In reality fire is like those barriers that we come across in our everyday lives. It’s

those beliefs in society that tell us that we are unable to become what we aspire to be. For

Sophie this was seen in the stubborn gender stereotypes of her era. Firstly, society told her that

because she was a woman, she was undeserving of receiving the same education as a man.

People told her that it would be a waste to educate a woman.

But I’m afraid that there’s something very important that I failed to mention at the beginning of

my speech. Yes, fire is destructive but it’s what follows this destruction that truly makes a fire

powerful. The process of regeneration. In truth, fire can be terrifying, trust me I know, and in the

same way, the challenges that we face in all of our lives can seem daunting. Too often we think

to ourselves, why is everything going against me? But aren’t these challenges what drive us?

Fire is what brought Sophie into this world 239 years ago. However, even after that she never

ceased to play with the flames. When society told her that she doesn’t deserve an education –

what did she do? She studied. Hard. All of the subjects that were customarily reserved for

males. She was like the equivalent of a year 12 QCS student except with only her brother,

Louise, to support her. Not the network of teachers and students that we have today. Louise,

seeing Sophie’s potential, took her by the hand and guided her through her education and in the

process, fuelled her passion to educate those around her.

Let me tell you though, the truth is that fire burns. I learnt that on multiple occasions in my

attempts to overcome my fear. These challenges in our lives sometimes really hurt. Do you think

that it was easy for Sophie to hear that the one thing she dreamed of attaining in this world, an

education, was impossible simply because she was female?

But at the same time, whilst fire burns, it never truly destroys. I don’t know if you have looked at

images of the aftermath of a forest fire. At first in the few weeks directly after the fire has

passed, the landscape looks barren, like a charred moonscape. It makes you doubt whether

anything could ever exist in that place again. However, after a few months you begin to see tiny

green shoots pushing their way through the charred dirt and dotting the landscape.

This is because fire is also a source of incredible growth. When Sophie was 18, she dreamt of

becoming a Carmelite nun. To do this she travelled for 140km, two days, from her little home

town of Joigny all the way to Paris. Only to find out when she arrived that the order had been

abolished. But what I find amazing is that she didn’t let that stop her. No, she simply started her

own order. The Society of the Sacred Heart.

In the same way, ladies, please don’t ever think that you have no way of achieving what you

want in your lives. The barriers that you face right now are only temporary, I promise. And if the

pathway that you are using at the moment seems too difficult. Like Sophie, know that there is

always another way to achieve what you are trying to do.

I’m not going to lie to you though. Once you have overcome the current barrier that you’re

facing, as soon as you breath that sigh of relief on the other side, you will look around you and

what will you see? Another frontier waiting to be crossed.

It’s kind of like looking at your reflection in an infinity mirror, whereby the barriers that you have

to overcome seem never ending. They just go on and on and on into the distance. It’s true – the

barriers that we will face in our lives are never ending. But does this necessarily mean that it’s

impossible?

You are sitting here today in this chapel, probably wishing that I would wrap this up soon,

because of the journey of one woman. Who lived an extraordinary life in extremely difficult

times. One of Sophie’s most famous quotes, that you have probably heard many times by now

is that “for the sake of one child I would have founded the society”. This means that in order for

one child to receive an education Sophie would have gone through the years of pain and

difficulties in overcoming the challenges that she faced in achieving her dreams.

You know, it wasn’t until Josie Kelly took my hand in year nine and forced me to light a match

that I overcame my fear of fire. Ladies, even though the challenges in our lives seem impossible

to overcome and on some days you think that God, it would be so easy to not try at all. Just

know that sometimes life will slap you hard in the face, wait for you to get back up then punch

you in the stomach. But honestly, getting the wind knocked out of you is the only way to teach

your lungs how much they love the taste of fresh air. You have each other, you have the strong

women sitting next to you, you have your teachers, you have your parents and most importantly,

you have yourselves. You have the strength within yourselves to face the challenges in your

lives. Let the flames fuel you.

Message from the Dean of Student Wellbeing

Student Responsible Use of Technology and Social Media Last term I shared with parents how much has been written in the media about supporting young …

view ARTICLE

Message from the Dean of Student Wellbeing

Student Responsible Use of Technology and Social Media

Last term I shared with parents how much has been written in the media about supporting young people to manage the risks associated with the online world.

For the remainder of Term 1, I consulted with staff and students about the rules we should be setting in our school for the use of technology and social media. Interestingly, the students reported through the Stand Up to Bullying Survey that they want clear boundaries with regard to technology.  Staff were also interested in putting clear and consistent standards in place to support each girl to be the best that she can be.

I am pleased to share a copy of the Student Responsible Use of Technology and Social Media Policy. I encourage you to speak with your daughter about these expectations. Your support in upholding these expectations will be important in ensuring your daughter can be the very best version of herself.

Setting rules around technology and social media at home

Similarly, along with the expectations we are working together to put in place at Stuartholme, the research shows that setting boundaries at home around social media and technology will bring real benefits.

I have provided some useful key tips and encourage you to explore the wide range of advice provided by Karen Young at the link below. Just keep in mind that the data clearly shows that children are more likely to meet expectations if they are involved in making the rules and that these are linked to their personal safety and welfare. Additionally, there is merit in having a conversation with your child about the biggest risks and considering the rules that will best protect them. That way, they will also feel that they have some autonomy.

  1. Be present – no technology should be permitted at certain times (at dinner).
  2. Privacy – work hard to protect identity and personal information.
  3. Not at night – no technology after a certain time at night or phones in the bedroom.
  4. Rules about behaviour – no viewing, creating or producing or sharing anything sexual, no bullying or bad language.
  5. Be balanced – balancing technology with other activities is important.
  6. Parental responsibility – be unafraid to protect your child as you would with any other risks.

References:

  1. https://www.heysigmund.com/technology-social-media-rules-children-teens-wish-parents-follow/ by Karen Young.

 St Madeleine Sophie Day

As the school newsletter is circulated, St Madeleine Sophie Day 2018 will be well underway. I would like to acknowledge and thank our Cor Unum Committee for their leadership and contribution towards our Feast Day celebrations embracing moments of prayer, sacrament and reflection, joyfulness and collegiality.

Their chosen theme “Name an iconic” has certainly added to the fun of St Madeleine Sophie Day celebrations encouraging the school to dress up as their favourite hero.

This was my first celebration day and I feel very honoured to have been inducted into the traditions of the Sacred Heart education at Stuartholme with the wise guidance of our Cor Unum Committee, staff and students.

Co-curricular News

Netball – QC Cup We had 3 netball teams, Team 1 (Intermediate), Team 5 (Cadets) and Team 11 (Juniors) all participated in the annual Queensland …

view ARTICLE

Co-curricular News

Netball – QC Cup

We had 3 netball teams, Team 1 (Intermediate), Team 5 (Cadets) and Team 11 (Juniors) all participated in the annual Queensland Catholic Cup Netball Tournament this year, held at the Metro Netball Association.

The QC Cup was a great opportunity for our three teams to play against other catholic schools, and to also gel together within their team environment. All three teams did extremely well, playing 7 – 8 games in the duration of the day. Congratulations to our coaches and their teams for displaying some very skilled, competitive netball and for playing in the spirit of the game. Team 1 placing 3rd, Team 5 placing 2nd and Team 11 placing 4th equal.

This competition is growing every year, netball is certainly alive and well in Catholic schools.

A special thank you to our Parents and our staff members Deanne Johnston, Charmaine Ferguson and Katharine McMain for coming along on the day and showing your support.

Indoor rowing

On Tuesday night, 30 Stuartholme girls competed in the 2018 Indoor Rowing Championships held at Somerville House.

The spirit of Stuartholme was out in force, with our supporters turning out in their red and yellow to cheer the rowers on!

We are so incredibly proud and thankful to those girls who made their way out to the venue to offer their support – it went such a long way.

The Stuartholme rowers didn’t disappoint, securing 6 first places out of 11 events and having a wonderful all round team performance!

Congratulations to our individual rowers; India Bailey (Year 8), Stella Hosking (Year 9), Erin Lafferty (Year 10), Lucy Hope (Year 11) and Phoebe Robinson (Year 12) who started the evening off for Stuartholme with very strong performances. Congratulations to Stella, Lucy and Phoebe who all had incredible 1st place performances!

The girls then combined into teams to compete in 5 year level team events and the All Age Relay. The girls had fantastic performances, with all 6 teams finishing in the top 5 and winning 3 out of 6 team events. The Year 11 and 12 teams had very strong team performances to take out their events. It was a wonderful finish to the evening with our Year 12 Team breaking the year level record by 2 seconds. This group of girls have left a lasting legacy on the BSRA Indoor competition, with most members of their team winning their team event every year since Year 9 and now holding 2 team records (Year 11 & Year 12). Stuartholme now holds 5 / 11 records at the competition (Year 11 Individual, Year 10 Team, Year 11 Team, Year 12 Team, All Age Relay).

We are all so proud of the team effort and spirit, with Elke Marriott jumping on stage for an “A1” after the Year 12 event. The girls also shared a beautiful Stuartholme War Cry outside the venue after the event. The positivity and comradery shared amongst the supporters, competitors, coaches, parents and supporters was wonderful to be a part of.

Congratulations girls on a wonderful start to the rowing season!

Results: http://www.bsra.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Screen-Shot-2018-05-23-at-5.17.57-pm.png

 

 

Met West Cricket

Congratulations to Sophie Smith, Year 9 on being selected in the Met West cricket team. Sophie will be in the State Championships in October on the Sunshine Coast.

Interhouse Music Festival Information

Please find below the confirmed section times for the Solo Music Awards being held this Sunday, 27 May. Students are required to arrive at the …

view ARTICLE

Interhouse Music Festival Information

Please find below the confirmed section times for the Solo Music Awards being held this Sunday, 27 May.

Students are required to arrive at the performance venue 10 minutes prior to the beginning of the section and are required to stay until the end of the section for the presentation of trophies and awards.

DRESS CODE:

Students are required to wear full school uniform (not music performance uniform), with stockings and polished school shoes. A blazer may be worn if required.

Hair should be kept neatly off the face, tied back with school hair ties only. No make-up, nail polish or jewellery is permitted.

VENUE: THEATRE

Senior Piano (Yrs 10, 11, 12): commence 10.00am; conclude 11.25am

Junior Piano (Yrs 7, 8, 9): commence 11.45am; conclude 12.33pm

Senior Band (Yrs 10, 11, 12): commence 12.45pm; conclude 1.40pm

Junior Band – Year 7: commence 2.00pm; conclude 2.30pm

Junior Band – Year 8: commence 2.45pm; conclude 3.33pm

Junior Band – Year 9: commence 3.45pm; conclude 4.15pm

VENUE: AUSTRALIAN ROOM

Junior Strings – Year 7: commence 10.00am; conclude 10.40am

Junior Strings – Year 8: commence 10.45am; conclude 11.15am

Junior Strings – Year 9: commence 11.15am; conclude 11.55am

Senior Strings (Yrs 10, 11, 12): commence 12.00 noon; conclude 12.31pm

Junior Vocal (Yrs 7, 8, 9): commence 12.45pm; conclude 2.00pm

Senior Vocal (Yrs 10, 11, 12): commence 2.00pm; conclude 3.00pm

Please note there will not be any food or drinks for sale at this event. Feel free to bring a picnic and enjoy your lunch in the school grounds.

A tea and coffee station will be available at each venue.

Options Career Information Bulletin Edition 8

Is there a test that tells you your ideal job? To find out check out the story on page 9, plus many more helpful ideas …

view ARTICLE

Options Career Information Bulletin Edition 8

Is there a test that tells you your ideal job? To find out check out the story on page 9, plus many more helpful ideas and tips in this edition of the Options Career Information Bulletin.

 

Ken Turnbull
Careers Counsellor

 

Science Snippets

What do land mines and tuberculosis have in common? …Both have the ability to kill thousands of people in countries, but a new discovery shows …

view ARTICLE

Science Snippets

What do land mines and tuberculosis have in common?

…Both have the ability to kill thousands of people in countries, but a new discovery shows that both can also be sniffed out by large rodents, known as the dreaded rat.

First beginning in 2000, the international non-profit APOPO (Anti-Persoonsmijnen Ontmijnende Product Ontwikkeling, a Dutch organisation that trains animals) has partnered with Tanzania’s Sokoine University of Agriculture, to train African giant pouched rats (Cricetomys ansorgei) to be able to detect the scent of TNT in land mines. By 2016, it was recorded that the animals had located almost 20,000 land mines both in Africa and Southeast Asia.

The zoonotic disease scientist behind it all, Georgies Mgode, wanted to help thousands of people further and therefore worked with his colleagues to begin training the rats to recognise tuberculosis. This infectious disease killed about 1.6 million people in 2016. Majority of the time it is unable to be detected even after swabs being microscopically examined under a microscope. Accurate technologies are costly or still in testing (SN Online, 2018).

“Every disease, anything organic, has a smell,” says Mgode. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, emits 13 volatile chemicals that set it apart from other microbes, he and colleagues reported in 2012. Training a rat to be a TB sniffer, recognising those smells in phlegm, takes about nine months.

These incredible rats have already identified 8351 cases and counting. However, they are still awaiting global medical approval. The animals did especially well on samples from young kids, who often cough up less phlegm for testing and have low bacterial counts.

Head of Research: Yao Hua Law
https://www.sciencenews.org/article/little-convincing-rats-can-detect-tuberculosis?tgt=nr

How can you get involved in science within the community?

  • Don’t worry it’s not too late! There’s only a few days left before the National Youth Forum submission closes on Thursday 31 May. For all the Year 11 Students, interested in futures involving science and technology, the National Youth Forum provides an amazing opportunity. The residential program is held over two weeks in January 2019. To apply or for more info, go to https://www.nysf.edu.au/
  • Annually UQ holds their ‘Careers that Shape the World’ sessions, this year it is being held on Tuesday 5 June and is available to all Year 11 and 12 students whether they are interested in pursuing science or not. The program allows for senior students to find out about a range of inspiring career opportunities across STEM, health, medicine, business, law, arts and humanities. For more info, head to https://www.uq.edu.au/shape-your-world/
  • For students Years 10 to 12 who face barriers reaching their potential, between the 8 July and 14 July the Youth Without Borders’ Spark Engineering Camp will be held. The week-long university camp consists of personal development, engineering and social activities. Nominations/applications are now open so hop on to http://spark.ywb.com.au/students/ to sign up or for more info.
  • Looking for something to do these holidays? Look no further, Experience Science is a free event that provides students in Years 10 – 12 the opportunity to discover what studying science is like at UQ and how science is applied in industry and everyday life. The event is facilitated by experts from UQ and industry through a series of hands-on, interactive science workshops. Go by yourself and meet new people or get together a group of friends. Thousands of students from Queensland and northern New South Wales have attended and enjoyed Experience Science over the past eleven years.

As we get into the exam period hope you all can keep focused and stress free. For those who need a little more help, Science Help is after school every Monday Week B.

Best of luck!

Sophia Tully, UQ Science Ambassador 2018

French News

Year 10 Immersion On Thursday 24 May Stuartholme hosted a Year 10 French Immersion afternoon. Students from seven Brisbane schools took part in workshops conducted in …

view ARTICLE

French News

Year 10 Immersion

On Thursday 24 May Stuartholme hosted a Year 10 French Immersion afternoon. Students from seven Brisbane schools took part in workshops conducted in French.

French Visitors

10 students from Lycée Arbez Carme which is near Lyon in France will be arriving on Friday 1 June with their teacher and staying until 10 June. Many thanks to all of the families who are hosting. We are looking forward to welcoming the students and their teacher.

MLTAQ (French Teachers’ Branch) Calligram Competition

Students in Years 7 and 8 are invited to take part in a competition to design a French themed calligram. Winning entries will be displayed at the Brisbane French Festival. Prizes are to be provided by the Alliance Française

Volunteering at the Brisbane French Festival

Students in Year 11 and 12 may like to volunteer at the Brisbane French Festival which is held on 6, 7, 8 July at Southbank. A knowledge of French is desirable but not essential.

Volunteer will receive free entry to the festival which is the biggest French festival in Australia and a T-shirt.

For more information go to https://lefestival.com.au/volunteers-2018/

 

Year 8 Camp

Our Year 8 girls travelled north from 10-12 May to idyllic Booloumba Creek in the Mary Valley for their camp. The weather was spectacular, although …

view ARTICLE

Year 8 Camp

Our Year 8 girls travelled north from 10-12 May to idyllic Booloumba Creek in the Mary Valley for their camp. The weather was spectacular, although the nights were suitably chilly for our nights “under canvas” in the rainforest!

The comprehensive educational program encouraged the girls to select whether to “step up/step sideways or step back” via a range of challenges provided in the shade of giant gums and clusters of hoop pines. Our 10km hike took us up and over into the national park and a refreshing  dip in the bracing crystal clear waters of Booloumba Creek followed. The Year 8 girls excelled in problem-solving and persisting when confronted with challenges- skills which will be referred to throughout their lives.

Congratulations Year 8!

Year 7 Drama

Year 7 performing contemporary melodramas of their own creation.

view ARTICLE

Year 7 Drama

Year 7 performing contemporary melodramas of their own creation.

Erskine Cup

Congratulations to Georgia Perissinotto (Year 12) on presenting her winning speech to claim the Erskine Cup! Students competed in the annual senior public speaking competition …

view ARTICLE

Erskine Cup

Congratulations to Georgia Perissinotto (Year 12) on presenting her winning speech to claim the Erskine Cup!

Students competed in the annual senior public speaking competition on Monday 21 May in front of their peers. Competitors had to present a speech of 4-6 minutes in length that was inspired by the Janet Erskine Stuart quote, “Do not wait for ideal circumstances, nor the best opportunities; they will never come”.

Well done to runner-up Isabella Tarabay (Year 10) in what was a very tough decision for the adjudicators. Both students were well prepared, spoke with integrity and motivated their peers through their speeches.

Best wishes to the junior competitors ahead of their public speaking competition which will be held on Saturday 2 June.

 

Parents of Stuartholme (PoS) Update

Firstly a big congratulations to the Stuartholme Mother’s Day Lunch Committee for hosting a very successful and fun Lunch to commence Mother’s Day weekend. Also …

view ARTICLE

Parents of Stuartholme (PoS) Update

Firstly a big congratulations to the Stuartholme Mother’s Day Lunch Committee for hosting a very successful and fun Lunch to commence Mother’s Day weekend. Also the previous weeks the Rowing Support Group held a fun filled evening at Freers hosting Glamour in the Grass Rowing Fundraiser! Big congratulations and thank you to all the working bodies behind the scenes to makes these events very meaningful to the Stuartholme community.

This week we hosted Rachel Saliba at the school who offered her insights and experiences on Parent Engagement. We look forward to putting these in action and hopefully Rachel will join our Parent community for more sessions in the future. The session discussed will become available on the my.Stuartholme Parents of Stuartholme tab.

The next PoS Meeting and Principal Update will be held on the first day on Term 3, Monday 16 July at 5.30pm in R106 and R107. All parents are welcomed to attend.

 

Flu facts from Queensland Health

Important flu facts from Queensland Health: 1.       Flu is dangerous for everyone, but particularly for children. 2.       Flu strains change each year 3.       Flu spreads …

view ARTICLE

Flu facts from Queensland Health

Important flu facts from Queensland Health:

1.       Flu is dangerous for everyone, but particularly for children.

2.       Flu strains change each year

3.       Flu spreads easily between people, particularly children

4.       If you (or your child) are unwell, stay home until better

5.       Remember it is not ‘just the flu’, it is a serious disease.  Having an annual flu vaccine will help keep you, your family and the community healthy this flu season.

In 2018, Queensland Health is offering free influenza vaccine to children aged 6 months to less than five years.

Visit: http://conditions.health.qld.gov.au/HealthCondition/condition/14/217/82/Influenza-The-Flu