In this issue

Feast Day of Saint Madeleine Sophie Barat
Chief Medical Officer outlines COVID boarding school protocols
Science Snippets
Social Justice News
View the Mass for Pentecost at Holy Spirit Church, Auchenflower
Refer a student and help us build our community
Free subscription to Catholic Leader
Statue of the Sacred Heart
Centenary book and merchandise

Message from the Principal

Dear Parents, Caregivers and Friends, Please click here to watch my Newsletter issue 8 address. Click here to watch the Madeleine Sophie Day Mass   Click here to watch our Music Department’s Let it be video Take care and God Bless, Kristen Sharpe Principal        

From the Principal
view ARTICLE

Message from the Principal

Dear Parents, Caregivers and Friends,

Please click here to watch my Newsletter issue 8 address.

Click here to watch the Madeleine Sophie Day Mass

 

Click here to watch our Music Department’s Let it be video

Take care and God Bless,

Kristen Sharpe
Principal

 

 

 

 

Message from the Deputy Principal

United as a Sacred Heart community It was wonderful to welcome back our day students this week while remaining connected to our boarding students to …

view ARTICLE

Message from the Deputy Principal

United as a Sacred Heart community

It was wonderful to welcome back our day students this week while remaining connected to our boarding students to celebrate as a community the Feast Day of our foundress St Madeleine Sophie Barat. Students were able to beam in for the mass, the picnic at lunch, and learning in the classroom. Through the power of technology, we have been able to remain connected and to share these experiences with our full Stuartholme community.

The Mass was a significant celebration of all that is Stuartholme, and the second reading, which provided a collection of reflections about community from our wisdom women was incredibly powerful. The words of Mother Janet Erskine Stuart resonated deeply with me and summed up a rich Sacred Heart education:

“There is deep-down unity, but there is no forced uniformity. The spirit is one, but its manifestations are many…no one is ‘made to order’ of this or that shape, but each gives what she can for the common good. The common good demanding for its own sake, as well as for hers, that she should remain – herself…” 

I found these words affirming of the Stuartholme experience and the transformative power of a Sacred Heart education. At Stuartholme, it is never a ‘one size fits all’ approach. It is targeted and individualised.

An individualised approach through continuous feedback

We are blessed at Stuartholme to have a comprehensive process of feedback and support that enhances our individualised approach. Through the myStuartholme platform, we capitalise on technology through the provision of regular updates on student academic learning to target improvement in a timely manner.

Even during these unprecedented times of COVID-19, our teaching faculty have worked to support student learning by providing feedback on individual assessment tasks. In addition, some of these tasks were modified to suit the adjusted learning conditions we have experienced. You can find feedback on individual assessment pieces in the Results section of myStuartholme. The Results section provides an excellent platform for students and parents to monitor progress.

Feedback on individual assessment tasks is direct and targeted. It outlines:

  • How well the task has been understood or performed;
  • How well the student understood the main processes required to perform the task; and,
  • The student’s management of their learning – planning and self-monitoring.

While the comments focus on what the student has done well, there is distinct attention placed on the language of improvement and ways to optimise learning success.

Supporting your daughter to learn about her learning

As teachers and parents/caregivers are the most influential adults in the lives of our students, the partnership in education is paramount to support students navigating feedback.

While it is important to collectively acknowledge work well done, research suggests if parents can support the learning journey through exploring feedback with their daughters in a more detailed way, this can further optimise student success.

In this light, Carol Dweck suggests being specific with affirmations and unpacking with your daughters how the outcome was achieved. This ensures they connect effort with the result. It is through this process; students can celebrate the struggle in the pursuit of mastery. Building both resilience and a growth mindset where mistakes are a platform for success allows students to realise learning requires both effort and strategy.

As Carol Dweck affirms, “if parents want to give their children a gift, the best thing they can do is to teach their children to love challenges, be intrigued by mistakes, enjoy effort and keep on learning.

As a Sacred Heart community, we are united in our efforts to ensure our young women experience a love of learning and want to keep on learning well beyond the gates of Stuartholme. It is apparent we do this in a unified way that considers individual achievement and growth.

I wish you all the best for the final few weeks of term.

Daniel Crump
Deputy Principal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Message from the Dean of Mission

Since the dawn of time, fire has been a primordial symbol. For the ancient Greeks it was associated with energy, assertiveness, and passion. We know the expression ‘fire in the …

view ARTICLE

Message from the Dean of Mission

Since the dawn of time, fire has been a primordial symbol. For the ancient Greeks it was associated with energy, assertiveness, and passion. We know the expression ‘fire in the belly’ and have a sense of what that means. And of course we’ve seen its destructive force – think back to summer this year and the horrific bushfires that swept across our land. For us at Stuartholme, it’s a symbol deeply connected to our Christian roots and the beginning of the Society of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. 

Pentecost and the birth of the Church. 

This coming Sunday, the Church celebrates the Feast of Pentecost. As scripture tells us, Pentecost is that moment when the Holy Spirit descends upon the apostles as tongues of fire (Acts 2:3), giving birth to the Church. One can only imagine what the disciples were thinking and feeling in this moment, given the events that had unfolded. Consider this – they’d lost their closest friend and teacher through the most gruesome of deaths (Luke 23:43); miraculously, they encountered him when he presented himself alive to them in a resurrected form (Acts 1:3); they then lose him again when he ascends to the heavens, having commissioned them to be witnesses to the ends of the earth (Acts 1:8-9). A string of events, that no doubt left the disciples in great turmoil as they tried to make sense of it, culminating in the Pentecost moment. 

Born into Fire: The birth story of Madeleine Sophie 

Curiously, fire was also prominent at the birth of our Saint Madeleine Sophie Barat, whose feast day we celebrated on Monday. We hear in her biography that on December 12, 1779, a fire raged in JoignyBurgandy, France, close to the Barat home, where Sophie’s mother, Madeleine, was heavily pregnant. Frightened by the threat of danger, she prematurely gave birth to a daughter, who was christened Madeleine Sophie. 1 If this wasn’t enough, this period of France’s history was marked by the well-known revolution, a time of great political turmoil that provided Sophie numerous challenges later in life as she went about growing the Society of the Sacred Heart. With fire in her heart, she persevered with courage and confidence. 

Leading with Courage & Determination 

Fire. Fear. Uncertainty. It seems that 2020 has delivered the trifecta here in Australia when you consider the bushfires of our summer and these recent COVID times. Whilst each of these stories is packed with challenges and difficulties, a defining character of each is the way that hope is never lost. Through faith, hope, courage and hard work, good things come from difficult times though the presence of the Holy Spirit. The growth of the Church from Pentecost, along with the growth of the Society of the Sacred Heart from humble beginnings gives evidence of this. Similarly, the response to the challenges of our current times has provided numerous examples of courage and determination in the face of adversity.  

Hope. Community. Spirit. 

Whilst our celebration of the Feast of Saint Madeleine Sophie did not eventuate as we’d planned, there was a special character to what eventuated. Signs of hope and the Spirit abounded! Our eucharistic celebration in the chapellivestreamed and watched locally and as far as Indonesia, was deeply moving; the superb rendition of Let IBe courtesy of our music staff and students united us in communion; the array of colour on the pavement of the school to welcome back our Year 7 to 10 students on their first day, courtesy Ms Margaret Devlin and the Year 11 and 12 students, would have made Sophie proud; the numerous hours of work and dedication behind the scenes to make our Livestream a success, courtesy of Mr Rory Edwards in IT, was deeply appreciated by all; and of course, the picnic that we shared with the school community at lunchtime, somewhat eucharistic, as we gathered as one body on our special day. 

Signs of hope. Signs of community. Signs of the Holy Spirit. 

Happy Madeleine Sophie Day to all. 

Justin Golding
Dean of Mission

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Message from the Dean of Boarding

Dear Parents and Guardians, This coming weekend we will welcome another eight girls into the House this brings us to a total of 28 girls.  …

view ARTICLE

Message from the Dean of Boarding

Dear Parents and Guardians,

This coming weekend we will welcome another eight girls into the House this brings us to a total of 28 girls.  In the table below you can see how many are either at home, being a day student or living with us in Boarding.  These 28 girls bring us to our limit of 25% of ‘normal’ occupancy that the Australian Health Principles Protection Committee (AHPPC) have originally outlined as the way to minimise risk in a Boarding school. We are currently working on updating our Risk Management Strategy document to send to the Metro North Public Health unit to investigate what we would need to do to return above 75%, and hopefully even more to Boarding for the beginning of Term 3.

Last Friday evening we had our first Recreation activity out under the stars and it was wonderful to see our International girls have some fun with the returned Boarders, as it has been a very long time with no other distractions than each other or the Boarding supervisors. We also allowed for the first time an opportunity for these girls to go off the site with a supervisor to a local shopping centre for an hour. During these next three weeks we will offer supervised times for the girls to choose to go off site to either Slaughter Falls or a local shopping centre in groups of 3 – 5 at a time. We have also encouraged the girls with us to invite immediate family and/or Grandparents in for a picnic on our site, but no other unsupervised leave is allowed at this time.

Ellen McLean and Melissa Robinson, our Assistant Heads of Boarding have been unstinting in their support of the girls during this time and it is wonderful that so many for the Boarders have made an effort to be part of our Year group Zoom gatherings. With Catherine Sagin’s departure I have asked Melissa Robinson to be the direct contact for our girls in Years 8, 9 and 10. Ellen McLean will continue to be the direct contact person for all Year 11 and 12 girls and their families and I have asked our two Senior Supervisors to take on added responsibilities, firstly Ursula Cooper to be the direct contact person for Year 7 and secondly Ming Du to be our direct contact person with our International girls and liaising with Ms Jane Verity in the day school world.

I would strongly encourage all girls at home to make the effort to connect with us during our Monday night House Meeting time, a little light relief at 5.30pm. It is one way to see who has returned to Boarding but to also keep up to date on any new endeavours that we are working on. Last Monday I didn’t award a prize for our photo competition as we didn’t have any entries, but this coming Monday I hope to see an overwhelming amount of photos showing the girls ‘favourite place’ from around their home.

Please contact me if you have any questions about this time of COVID-19, I have just accepted that it is movable feast, and I am looking forward to having a more normal world, as I am sure you are as well.

Take care and be well

Karen Davies
Dean of Boarding

Year GroupBoardingDayHomeTotal
12126725
111251128
10361120

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Message from the Dean of Student Wellbeing

Supporting our young women to stand up on their own two feet bravely and sing of victory “Even though you have fallen a thousand times …

view ARTICLE

Message from the Dean of Student Wellbeing

Supporting our young women to stand up on their own two feet bravely and sing of victory

“Even though you have fallen a thousand times in one day, if in the evening you stand up again on your own two feet, you may sing of victory.” St Madeleine Sophie Barat.

I was inspired on St Madeleine Sophie Day by the joint homily delivered by Sr Rita Carroll rscJ, and our 2020 Cor Unum Captain – Imogen Fraser during the mass.

Drawing on the brave leadership of St Madeleine Sophie Barat in the wake of COVID-19 was a theme they shared.

Continuing to work together to support our young women to be brave is at the heart of the Sacred Heart Educational Goals and our ongoing pursuit to support every single student to be her very best.

Madeleine Sophie provides much wisdom about why it is critical to rise to this challenge and it is fitting to draw on her words.

 Developing brave to support success

“Let us respect childhood: let us honour the soul of that small creature of God who can already make choices of the best if we take the time to awaken reason and make her use her judgment.”

St Madeleine Sophie Barat.

Psychologists suggest that building brave children is a concept that can be meaningfully developed rather than being left by chance.

In our Wise Wellness Program bravery is one of the attributes we aim to develop. In the interests of supporting parents at home to reinforce this work we do at school, I share the following advice:

  • Encourage her to dream big.
  • Embolden her to take risks.
  • Teach her to speak bravely, even if she gets called bossy.
  • Continually remind her she is lovable and worthy, no matter what.
  • Help her define herself beyond beauty, brand or brains.
  • Model the bravery you hope to inspire.

 Bravely building community and spirit

“Your example, even more than your words, will be an eloquent lesson to the world.”  St Madeleine Sophie Barat.

We look no further than our Senior students to see a modern example of young people displaying bravery in building community and spirit in their endeavours to welcome back our Junior School.

Our seniors left a positive messaging on every single student’s locker, including our boarders, and created fabulous chalk drawings across the school which were superb to see.

At morning tea, the Year 7s took absolute delight in looking for their names written in chalk on the ground in their area!

Congratulations to our Ms Devlin, Ms Meehan, our Years 11 and 12 Students and all of their Teacher Mentors for this terrific leadership and collaboration.

 Finishing strongly!

As we embark on the final three weeks of Term, let’s draw on the inspiration of our founder in continuing to support our young women to stand up on their own two feet bravely and sing of victory.

Deb Lonsdale-Walker
Dean of Student Wellbeing

Click on a photo to start galley

References:

  1. St Madeleine Sophie Barat, various.
  2. Warrell, M. 2016. How to Raise Brave Girls. Women’s Advocate & Ambassador in Global Business Blog.

 

 

 

 

 

Message from the Careers Counsellor

Hi everyone, What a fun fortnight! National Careers Week Thank you to everyone who got involved in National Careers Week last week. It was wonderful …

view ARTICLE

Message from the Careers Counsellor

Hi everyone,

What a fun fortnight!

National Careers Week

Thank you to everyone who got involved in National Careers Week last week. It was wonderful to see the creativity, imagination, research skills and interest from all year levels.

The winners were:

Challenge 1: Your family tree of careers

Winner: Melanie Ashley, Runner up: Jennifer Chung

Challenge 2: From the horse’s mouth!

Winner: Eleanor O’Brien, Runner up: Emma Barry

Challenge 3: DIY job design

Winner: Isabella Brown, Runner up: Elyse Johns

Challenge 4: To interview-finity and beyond!

Winner: Elyse Johns, Runner up: Phoebe Cranitch

Challenge 5: Suit up!

Winner: Annabelle Fisher, Runner up: Holly Carrington

National Careers Week Scavenger Hunt (run across all five days)

Winner: Zara Woodham

 

Here is a slideshow of some of the amazing entries for the daily challenges:

Click on an image to start gallery

 

Alumnae panels

We also had a couple of wonderful alumnae panels this fortnight.

Last week, we were joined by some mid-career alumnae who were doing jobs that are not very well known, including Experience Design Consultant, Digital Marketing Specialist, Industrial Design Consultant and HealthTech Company Founder, and Intelligence Analyst. It was very cool to get advice from these amazing ladies about what had helped them find careers they enjoyed, but hadn’t heard about in school.

We were also joined by some young alumnae in this week’s 12 Wise Wellness class. The focus was on transitioning out of school and finding a pathway that suits you. There was some really amazing advice shared by the alumnae who joined us from all over the country and world: Brisbane, Melbourne, Canberra and Norway! Year 12 then worked through some activities and videos designed to get them prepared for whichever pathway they want to pursue after school.

 

Please find below some opportunities that you and your daughters might find interesting.

 

Warm regards,

Mr Lillyman

Careers Counsellor

 

 

 

Explore

Griffith: Live Stream careers events

Are you interested in a career in STEM? You might like to join one (or more) of the following live stream sessions with Griffith experts:

2-2.30pm, Thursday 28 May 2020    Careers in Biomedical and Medical Science

2-2.30pm, Tuesday 2 June 2020        Careers in Marine Science

2-2.30pm, Thursday 4 June 2020      Careers in Structural Engineering

2-2.30pm, Tuesday 9 June 2020        Careers in Physics

2-2.30pm, Thursday 11 June 2020    Careers in Robotics

2-2.30pm, Tuesday 16 June 2020      Careers in Mechanical Engineering

2-2.30pm, Thursday 18 June 2020    Careers in Big Data Analytics

If you’re interested, you can register here. I’ll also share recordings from these sessions in next fortnight’s newsletter.

Beyond QCE: Virtual Careers Expo

Because it’s not possible to get to uni Open Days this year, you might be interested in checking out the free Beyond QCE Virtual Career Expo. Most major universities will be exhibiting online at this expo. Find out more and register here.

ADFA: Learn more about doing uni with the Defence Force

The Australian Defence Force Academy (ADFA) have a virtual info session coming up on 10 June. Learn more about what you could study and what the lifestyle at ADFA is like. For more info, and to register, click here.

 Inspirational women in STEM

Role models can have a big impact on your career. You might like to read more about some amazing women in STEM on the Careers with STEM website. There are also some very interesting career ideas on the Australian Science Channel website, if you love maths or science and would like to see where these could take you after school.

Good to know

Facts and myths about university

UQ have published a very handy facts and myths about uni here. Most of these facts and myths apply across all universities, not just UQ, so I’d encourage you to have a read!

Griffith: Using VET and other alternative qualifications for entry

Griffith will continue to accept VET and AMEB qualifications as a basis for entry to uni, regardless of a student’s ATAR eligibility. Attached is a list of qualifications that may be accessible with different levels of VET qualifications – Cert III, Cert IV and Diplomas.

UQ: Changes to Bachelor of Science entry requirements for 2021 & beyond

UQ has relaxed the prerequisite subjects for their Bachelor of Science and most related dual degrees. In 2020, the prerequisites were English, Mathematical Methods plus one of Chemistry or Physics. For entry in 2021, the prerequisites are English, Mathematical Methods plus one of Chemistry, Physics, Biology or Earth and Environmental Science.

What is coming up?

1-30 July UCAT tests are happening (last date to book is 1 June)
Early Term 3 QTAC speaker for Stu students and parents via Zoom (date TBC)
29 July ACU Community Achiever Program applications close
4 August QTAC, VTAC, UAC applications open
Aug-Sept TAC Attac weekly drop ins at Stu
13 August Applications for UQ B Music auditions close
4 September Queensland Conservatorium applications due to QTAC and Griffith
20 September UAC School Recommendation Scheme closes

QUT fine arts applications due to QUT and QTAC – for courses like Music, Acting, & Visual Arts.

25 September UNE Early Entry Scheme closes
30 September VTAC & UAC applications due

Most medicine applications due to QTAC (and to uni if another application required – e.g. JCU)

Aim to have all QTAC applications in by this date

 

 

 

 

Co-curricular News

Stu Run Challenge

view ARTICLE

Co-curricular News

Stu Run Challenge

Feast Day of Saint Madeleine Sophie Barat

Monday 25 May is the Feast Day of our foundress, Saint Madeleine Sophie Barat. Ordinarily our Chapel would have been filled with all our students …

view ARTICLE

Feast Day of Saint Madeleine Sophie Barat

Monday 25 May is the Feast Day of our foundress, Saint Madeleine Sophie Barat. Ordinarily our Chapel would have been filled with all our students and guests.

Of course this year, we couldn’t celebrate in that way. Instead, we sent out an invitation to our community to attend virtually and sent them a link. At 9am on Monday morning, people from literally all over the globe could join us for Mass. Students watched together in their classrooms and our boarders who cannot yet return to school, watched with their families.

In her reflection, Sr Rita Carroll rscJ summed it up beautifully, she said:

“We gather back at Stuartholme after a long absence, at the time when we had planned to be celebrating our Centenary in St Stephen’s Cathedral with our Archbishop presiding. It is Sophie’s Feast Day and it seems she wanted to gather her family around her again as any mother does on a special day. We are not yet permitted to be together in the chapel as a whole assembly. Most of us are at home again in our classrooms while the majority of our boarders are still scattered, but we are all forming one community again at Stuartholme linked in cyberspace.”

If you would like to watch the Mass please click here.

At lunch time, students set up their picnic blankets on the lawn and enjoyed lunch with their friends.

Click on a photo to start gallery

Chief Medical Officer outlines COVID boarding school protocols

Queensland Country Life ran the following story on Thursday 28 May. We wanted to share it with our community, to keep you updated on the …

view ARTICLE

Chief Medical Officer outlines COVID boarding school protocols

Queensland Country Life ran the following story on Thursday 28 May. We wanted to share it with our community, to keep you updated on the issues around returning all our boarders to school.

 

A number of risk management procedures have been put in place at boarding schools that are re-opening.

The Isolated Children’s Parents’ Association has welcomed a letter from Chief Health Officer Jeannette Young that sets out the protocols developed to manage the return of students to boarding schools.

Regional interpretations on what constitutes a dormitory were among the items that have been causing confusion among Queensland’s boarding community trying to understand whether they were able to return their children to school.

At the beginning of May, the Australian Health Protection Principal Committee released a statement about risk management for re-opening boarding schools and school-based residential colleges, advising on ways to reduce the potential risk of COVID-19 transmission in schools.

On the topic of sleeping arrangements, it states that if there is “no option but to keep dormitory accommodation, then significant reduction on normal occupancy to 25 per cent of usual level” must take place.

Australian Boarding Schools Association CEO Richard Stokes said some regional education units were being particularly pedantic and old-fashioned in their understanding of what constituted a dormitory.

“Some are thinking of the big open rooms of the old days, whereas now they’re divided into smaller, more private rooms,” he said.

“Metro North is calling that a dorm whereas Toowoomba is calling the same thing separate rooms.

“It’s not OK at the Gold Coast but it is at Townsville.”

Mr Stokes said the confusion was causing grief to already-stressed parents, some of whom had sons at one school and daughters at another, with two different interpretations.

The organisation has been working closely with the Isolated Children’s Parents’ Association at federal and state levels to try and bring some form of standardisation and clarity, and this is ongoing.

Queensland ICPA vice president Louise Martin said Thursday’s information release from Chief Medical Officer Jeannette Young would go a long way toward clearing up other uncertainty in the boarding community.

“There was a period of real unrest when some schools re-opened to boarders and others didn’t,” she said. “The letter that’s been put together shows this is health advice that schools have to conform to.”

According to the letter, available on the Queensland ICPA Facebook page, boarding schools and school-based residential colleges are required to develop a COVID-19 risk management plan for review and feedback by their local Public Health Unit prior to re-opening.

Some schools, such as Stuartholme School where her daughters are in Year 9, have been unable to accommodate a full complement of boarders because of the AHPPC directive for a preference for individual use of bathrooms/toilets.

Ms Martin said they weren’t taking boarders from Years 7-10, except for siblings, dependent on numbers.

“Some Year 11 and 12 students have decided to be day scholars too, but that’s an individual decision,” she said.

Parents were also choosing not to return their children to schools that were able to open to all boarders, partly because of the timing with the end of term two, and others because of concerns around managing possible future lockdowns.

“The distance factor is at play,” Ms Martin said.

“It doesn’t make economic sense for some, and some want to play it safe.

“They’re sincerely hopeful all boarding students will be able to start at the beginning of term three though.”

Mr Stokes said it was important to understand that despite the statement by Education Minister Grace Grace that all students were now back at school, that wasn’t the case for boarding schools, because of the rules put in place.

The concern was that online learning opportunities would drop now that most students were back at school, he said, adding that schools would find it hard to teach both face-to-face and online equally well.

According to Ms Martin, if a family had chosen to keep their child at home, a school may not be able to guarantee the same educational experience for them.

“Stuartholme is endeavouring to make every effort for our girls, because there’s no other choice for them.

“Schools who are unable to accommodate all their boarders are still providing the best level of education they can.”

On the area of crossing state borders to return students to school, Mr Stokes said Queensland’s Chief Medical Officer had given an exemption for that to happen, and for parents to take them to school, as long as they weren’t coming from a hot spot.

A variety of exemptions have been made to the 14-day self-quarantine rule, including for any boarder travelling to Queensland from the Northern Territory, who had been in the NT for 14 days before entering Queensland.

Any boarder living within a border community, approximately 200km from NSW, South Australian or NT borders is also exempt, providing they’ve had no contact with known or suspected COVID-19 cases in the preceding 14 days.

Term three speculation

Louise Martin said families with children still at home were resigned to seeing the term out but looking forward to having them start at school in term three.

“There’s still a level of uncertainty around term three but I’ve quickly learnt not to speculate – it’s fruitless in the current environment,” she said. “I know our school is missing the girls terribly and desperately want to have the whole boarding family back, because it’s an integral part of the school.”

Outlining the difficulties facing boarding school managers, she said a consistency of care was an important factor and schools had built up strong levels of rapport with their boarder families, and put a lot into skilling staff to create a home away from home.

“If students can’t go back next term, some will have to seriously consider how many staff they can continue to support,” she said.

Science Snippets

Covid-19 tests, we have all heard about them, but do we actually know what they are? Well, there are two different types of tests, the …

view ARTICLE

Science Snippets

Covid-19 tests, we have all heard about them, but do we actually know what they are? Well, there are two different types of tests, the molecular test and the antigen test. The molecular test detects genetic material of the virus using a lab technique called polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A health care worker collects fluid from a nasal or throat swab or from saliva. Results may be available in minutes if analysed onsite or one to two days if sent to an outside lab. Molecular tests are considered very accurate when conducted correctly. An antigen test is a newer COVID-19 test that detects certain proteins that are part of the virus. Using a nasal or throat swab to get a fluid sample, antigen tests can produce results in minutes. Because these tests are faster and less expensive than molecular tests are, some experts consider antigen tests more practical to use for large numbers of people. A positive antigen test result is considered very accurate, but there is an increased chance of false negative results — meaning it is possible to be infected with the virus but have negative antigen test results. So antigen tests aren’t as sensitive as molecular tests are.

Sources used:

https://asm.org/Articles/2020/April/COVID-19-Testing-FAQs

https://www.uclahealth.org/antibody-serology-testing

By Kathryn Capstick (Year 11 UQ Science Ambassador)

 

Opportunities for Year 11 and 12 students:

UQ Science Twilight Talks –  UQ academics will deliver short seminars on topics directly relevant to Year 11 and 12 subjects to complement what you may be learning in your classroom. These are for students and teachers in QLD and Northern NSW, and free for students, parents, and teachers to attend.

Register here on bit.ly/uq-science-twilight-talks

Here is an example of what I have registered for:

How to hunt for dark matter: telescopes, lab experiments, colliders, and putting it all together (Monday 1st June 5 – 5:45pm)

The Smart City: Friend of Foe? (Friday 5th June 5 – 5:45pm)

The Biology of Viruses: Cladistics, CRISPR and COVID19 (Saturday 6th June 2 – 3:30pm)

If you register and then are unable to zoom, you will be sent the video link to watch later. There are some interesting topics to engage with. I hope you enjoy!

Kind regards,

Wendy Macdonald (Leader of Learning – Science)

Social Justice News

Social Justice at Stuartholme has had the opportunity to reflect and act on four significant opportunities in the last two weeks. These have been: Stu …

view ARTICLE

Social Justice News

Social Justice at Stuartholme has had the opportunity to reflect and act on four significant opportunities in the last two weeks. These have been:

Stu Can’t Ask That – On Friday 15th May Social Justice hosted Stu Can’t Ask That for not only Stuartholme students, but our sister Sacred Heart school, Sacre Coeur. This was an opportunity for our students to join a Zoom meeting with two young women, Sara and Nas, who have experienced the refugee journey to Australia. Sara and Nas were impressed by the compassionate, intelligent and curious questions asked by our students. Tara Nic Phaidin in Year 8 commented, “I just wanted to let you know how much I enjoyed the Stu can’t ask that zoom session this afternoon. I just loved learning about these two ladies’ lives and their immigration stories.”

Laudato Si Week – From Monday 18th May to Sunday 24th May, Stuartholme celebrated Laudato Si Week, by recognising our roles in creating a just and sustainable future. Social Justice at Stuartholme acknowledged this week by analysing the environmental and ethical impact of our everyday necessities, including something as simple as a cup of coffee, to a picnic table we eat lunch at. Our students learnt that these material items not only have an impact in the process of being constructed, but also in how they will be effectively disposed of, or even potentially recycled. These actions and choices not only effect our world and our duty as stewards of creation, but in the long term can negatively impact the Common Good.

 

National Volunteer Week – From Monday 18th May to Sunday 24th May Social Justice at Stuartholme asked our students to reflect on and nominate their peers, who they believed deserved to be acknowledged as outstanding volunteers. We were humbled by the number of nominations, and from this very deserving group, five students and one staff were selected for profiling. These women reflect the Sacred Heart charism of mission and education, not only acting on issue, but working on understanding why it happens initially. Stuartholme’s National Volunteer Week profiles are:

  • Elyse Johns (Year 10) – creating and running a YouTube children’s story telling channel, Elyse reminds us that when you find your strength you inspire others
  • Annella Casey (Year 11) – a dedicated RSPCA volunteer, she cares and provides safety for neglected and injured dogs, Annella’s warm heart demonstrates that all creatures deserve love
  • Holly Clemson (Year 10) – for her willingness to volunteer for social justice activities such as mass and Big Night Out, but more so her ability to empower and encourage new volunteers
  • Emma Barry (Year 11) – a long serving member of JPIC Emma has a key interest in environmental issues and seeks to always understand both sides of the problem
  • Nieve Dickman (Year 12) – aligning her passion in helping the marginalised to an avid interest and participation in volunteering and in turn her future university aspirations. Nieve volunteers weekly with Active8 and demonstrates to younger students that volunteering can be a lifestyle.
  • Sr Kylee Brain (Nurse Manager, staff) – is one of the key staff in planning, training, and managing Sony Camp. Kylee spends her time ensuring our students, and campers are well cared for and safe.

 

National Reconciliation Week – Wednesday 27th May to Wednesday 3rd June marks National Reconciliation Week. The theme for 2020 National Reconciliation Week is In this together, it reminds us that we all have a role to play when it comes to reconciliation, and in playing our part we collectively build relationships and communities that value Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, histories, cultures, and futures. Stuartholme students have reflected on National Reconciliation Week through access to free screenings of In My Blood It Runs, presented by World Vision and creating a ‘Sorry’ banner through interpreted Indigenous colours and artwork.

 

Statue of the Sacred Heart

If you look up as you leave the chapel, you will see the statue of the Sacred Heart which dominated the original front entrance of …

view ARTICLE

Statue of the Sacred Heart

If you look up as you leave the chapel, you will see the statue of the Sacred Heart which dominated the original front entrance of the school. Our records show that it arrived in May 1926. Here is the entry from the Economat Journal.

With the gift of our Ipswich Road friends and others, we got a statue of the Sacred Heart for the entrance of the House. We ordered it in Paris through Messrs Pellegrini & Co. It is in white terra cotta and the cost, freight included, was £56.0.0. In May Mr Cunningham came to put it up. It was a difficult piece of work – a scaffold had to be built from the second storey – the work took about ten days but we took the opportunity that the scaffolding was up to get the gable and front of the house painted with water proof composition. The walls had got very damp during a long spell of rain in 1924 and it was to prevent this happening again that the wall was painted.
Mr Cunningham’s invoice for erection and painting was for £65 and £45 of this was paid with money given for the statue of the Sacred Heart.

Over the years the statue of the Sacred Heart lost its arm, so it became one of our Centenary projects to have it restored. We searched for photos to show what it had been like originally but we were defeated by the technology of the age. Photography was generally limited to the famous Brownie Box camera so distant photos of the school did not have the resolution that we needed. We relied on the common images of the day to restore our statue. Access to the statue was still a challenge as scaffolding had to be erected in the tribune to carry out the task.

Now as you walk out of the chapel remember to look up to see our renewed statue of the Sacred Heart reminding us that we draw our spirit, Cor Unum, from the Heart of Jesus.

Sr Rita Carroll rscJ

Refer a Student and help us build our community

view ARTICLE

Refer a Student and help us build our community

View the Mass for Pentecost at Holy Spirit Church, Auchenflower

St Ignatius Parish has recorded a Mass for Pentecost at Holy Spirit Church, Auchenflower – the 50th Anniversary of Pentecost in the church. You are …

view ARTICLE

View the Mass for Pentecost at Holy Spirit Church, Auchenflower

St Ignatius Parish has recorded a Mass for Pentecost at Holy Spirit Church, Auchenflower – the 50th Anniversary of Pentecost in the church.

You are warmly invited to watch the Mass here https://youtu.be/rSO33_8bi-A

 

Free subscription to Catholic Leader

The Catholic Leader is offering a free digital subscription to Stuartholme families and employees. The Catholic Leader is Australia’s most widely read Catholic newspaper and …

view ARTICLE

Free subscription to Catholic Leader

The Catholic Leader is offering a free digital subscription to Stuartholme families and employees.

The Catholic Leader is Australia’s most widely read Catholic newspaper and regularly includes education features, as well as providing a Catholic perspective on important news across South East Queensland.

You can sign up to receive your weekly digital newspaper here.

Centenary book and merchandise

To commemorate our centenary in 2020 Stuartholme invites you to purchase our  ‘Celebrating 100 years’ book. This beautiful, limited edition, hardcover book follows the history …

view ARTICLE

Centenary book and merchandise

To commemorate our centenary in 2020 Stuartholme invites you to purchase our  ‘Celebrating 100 years’ book.

This beautiful, limited edition, hardcover book follows the history of Stuartholme from humble beginnings, through to the school we know and love today.

Books can still be purchased for the early bird price of $69.95 (plus postage if needed).

Click here to purchase. Orders will be shipped in May, 2020.

100 Year Merchandise

To celebrate our centenary we have commissioned a small range of memorabilia available for sale. The items are now available for sale at the School Shop. To view the items, please click here.

Centenary fine chain necklace – $41.60
Solid silver bracelet – $53
Centennial pin – $4
Stuartholme tea towels – $5 each or 3 for $10.