In this issue

Message from Commercial Director – information on Drought Funding
Stuartholme Morning Herald – news from Cor Unum
Science Snippets
STU Virtual Fitness Club
Honour Pockets
Year 12 Field Trip
Congratulating Big 3 winners

Message from the Principal

Dear Parents, Caregivers and Friends, For this edition of the Newsletter, I want to share my message via video. This is my first attempt at using screen-o-matic, so I hope that by the time I am proficient at it, we will all be back at school. Message from the Principal …

From the Principal
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Message from the Principal

Dear Parents, Caregivers and Friends,

For this edition of the Newsletter, I want to share my message via video. This is my first attempt at using screen-o-matic, so I hope that by the time I am proficient at it, we will all be back at school.

Message from the Principal

 

Take care and God Bless,

Kristen Sharpe
Principal

 

 

 

 

Message from the Deputy Principal

And when inventions multiply and science does so much, we rather tend to minimise the vital human touch. Anon When reflecting on my first term …

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Message from the Deputy Principal

And when inventions multiply and science does so much, we rather tend to minimise the vital human touch.

Anon

When reflecting on my first term at Stuartholme, I certainly didn’t expect a global pandemic to form part of this picture. It’s interesting how life challenges our best-laid plans, and we are encouraged to grow in ways we never imagined.

Over the past few weeks, we have become ever too familiar with the word’s isolation and social distancing. In the world of education, these words are indeed jarring. For at its essence, the magic of education is captured through it being a highly relational art form.

As educators, we have been dealing with the quandary of maintaining our core relationships with our community in the virtual learning environment. Maintaining relationship has been the key focus in the development of Stuartholme’s ‘learn from home’ model, and relationship underpins the philosophy of STU@HOME.

STU@HOME is our way of ensuring we maintain the relational in a virtual context. We believe at its very core; maintaining relationships is what will assist our community to get through the physical distance and ensure our academic, spiritual and social wellbeing is supported.

In the STU@HOME model, you will see some key features to support you and your daughters. From explicit learning experiences outlined through class OneNotes, specifically designed instructional videos, to Zoom Connect, Clarify and Confirm sessions. These virtual online sessions with your daughter’s teachers, mentors and leaders will ensure at every opportunity relationship is central, and we bring Stuartholme to your home.

Also, parents and students are supported through a full suite of material and resources on the myStuartholme platform under the STU@HOME tile. I encourage you to take the time to explore this and read over the STU@HOME protocols for both parents and students. These have been developed to support the safety of all in the online learning context.

Over the past week, our teachers have worked tirelessly being trained and preparing for a virtual Stuartholme environment. For professionals who have had their well-tuned craft shifted on their head in the past few weeks, I am wholeheartedly impressed with the way our staff have rallied together to support one another. Our staff have pivoted their thinking to ensure we continue to place our students and their development at the core of what we do through the virtual context. It is clear our teachers are passionate and genuinely see the call to teaching as a vocation where relationship is central.

As the term draws to a close, I reflect on the warm welcome I have received at Stuartholme. I have thoroughly enjoyed getting to know the community and forming relationships with staff, with the parents and of course our impressive students. Despite the challenge of what we have faced as a community, we have risen to this, and we will continue to evolve and learn. For the welcome I have received, and for this beautiful community, I feel truly blessed.

I wish you and your families all the joy and grace of the Easter season. I look forward to remaining connected with you throughout Term 2.

Blessings and best wishes,

Daniel Crump
Deputy Principal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Message from the Dean of Mission

How are you celebrating Easter this year? Have you given any thought to how you will celebrate Easter this year? With the various social restrictions …

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Message from the Dean of Mission

How are you celebrating Easter this year?

Have you given any thought to how you will celebrate Easter this year? With the various social restrictions that the Government is using to protect us, it’ll be an Easter like no other. Even hosting a small gathering at home with extended family is off the table, let alone participating in some form of worship with your local parish.

Due to the importance it holds in the lives of Christians, for many, Easter is often that one time in the year that families try to get to Church. Whilst that is not possible this year, our local Toowong Parish have provided us with some liturgical resources that you may wish to use in your family home.

Introduction

Palm Sunday

The End of Lent

Holy Thursday

Good Friday

Easter Sunday

Even though things are different this year, it’s important that we recall the events of the life of Jesus in our own way. Afterall, these events contain the richest and most ancient symbols of the Catholic faith such as:

  • The waving of palms on Palm Sunday reminds us that we are called to be followers of Jesus.
  • The feet washing on Holy Thursday speaks of the selfless love that we are called to practice in imitation of Jesus.
  • The veneration of the cross on Good Friday is a reminder, that as Christians, we believe that Jesus can overcome anything, even death.
  • The lighting of the Easter fire in a darkened church and the celebration of baptisms on Holy Saturday point to the new life that is available through the resurrection of Jesus.

In considering Jesus’ journey to the cross, it is also important to remember how difficult that journey was. He carried his cross through the narrow, crowded streets of Jerusalem. It was Passover time and so the city was full of people, many of whom mocked, jostled and took pleasure in watching as he struggled with his heavy burden.

“Let us bear our cross and leave it to God to determine the length and the weight.”

The journey that Jesus made on that day remains a symbol of Christianity in the world, as it struggles with its own crosses in the challenges of our modern life. Our wisdom woman, St Philippine Duchesne knew this well when she said “Let us bear our cross and leave it to God to determine the length and the weight.” The streets of our towns are filled with people who carry their personal crosses – who are weighed down by the cards that life has dealt them. The same can be said for our School community. Each of us has our own struggles in life and burdens to bear.

“Let us fix our eyes on the cross in every difficult moment, and that gaze will renew our courage.”

As we reflect on these Easter mysteries, Jesus is inviting us to journey with him and to reflect on his suffering as it continues in the lives of you and me and the people of the world. This is particularly significant this year, with the COVID-19 pandemic. He is also calling us to be free of our struggles through the hope and freedom that is offered by the resurrection. St Madeleine Sophie Barat knew this when she said “Let us fix our eyes on the cross in every difficult moment, and that gaze will renew our courage.”

Beating with One Heart in Prayer

As we begin the Easter break and enter into a STU@HOME model of operating, I encourage all families to explore our Mission site on the STU@HOME portal. Here you will find numerous resources to nourish your spiritual journey in these times. I particularly draw your attention to our Beating with One Heart in Prayer COVID-19 prayer book.

In these times of distance, let us remain united in one heart – Cor Unum.

Peace and blessings to all for the Easter season.

Justin Golding
Dean of Mission

 

 

 

 

 

Message from the Dean of Boarding

Dear Parents and Guardians, The end of term has come, and I can only say a huge THANK YOU to all in our community for …

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Message from the Dean of Boarding

Dear Parents and Guardians,

The end of term has come, and I can only say a huge THANK YOU to all in our community for your willingness to work with us as the COVID-19 situation asked us to look and relook at each and every aspect of our life here on the hill. The Assistant Heads of Boarding have been unstinting in their support of the girls during the earlier part of term as usual, but over the last three weeks much more work has been completed particularly in the new landscape called STU@Home.

So, for once Boarding is coming to you! For many of our Boarders STU@HOME sees a return to their primary education via distance and/or home education. We feel confident that many of our Boarders will be more than ok in this space, but we also recognise that Stuartholme has provided you all with some comforts in the learning space as well.

For a number of years Stuartholme Boarding has had a closed Boarding Facebook Group which has been a great space for us to share photos and happenings from Boarding with parents at home. STU@HOME Boarding will now see the students and parents sharing what’s happening at home with us.

So we will be reproducing some of the great things about Boarding via STU@Home so that we keep you all connected throughout this time with events like our:

Monday Night House Meeting

The Boarding Leadership Team will pre-record a message to go on the closed Boarding Facebook Page as well as the Year 7 and 8 OneNote. We would love the girls to send stories or updates from home which can also be shared in this space. Information around what’s happening in Brisbane and Stuartholme will be shared, including any updates regarding the COVID-19 situation.

What’s Up Wednesday

Our usual routine for Wednesday night is a BBQ outside with music and dancing. ‘What’s Up Wednesday’ will be an opportunity for the wider Boarding staff to be connected with the Boarders. Boarding Supervisors will be asked to contribute to a segment which will be aired on Wednesday nights. Topics may include:

  • Book club
  • Cooking at home
  • Origami with me
  • Craft with me
  • Fun fitness
  • Walk with me

Photography Competition

In the first Monday Night House Meeting we will be announcing our term long photography competition. The girls will be asked to take and submit a range of photographs on differing themes in order to foster community spirit and maintain connection with each other.

Friday Favourites

The girls will be asked to send a photo of their favourite things/activities which will be posted on the Facebook

Communications with all our Community

Fortnightly Phone Calls to Parents from Dean of Boarding

I would like to call each family on a fortnightly basis to keep connections with you all and be a conduit of information for how we can support your daughter at this time. I will be asking what is/is not working, how is the NBN assisting you or not, do we need to look at other creative ways to ensure that your daughter has access to her learning during this time, if we can do anything to support them in their new normal, and how you are going in this new space of all the family under one roof.

Weekly Phone Calls to Students from Assistant Head of Boarding

Each Assistant Head of Boarding (AHOB) will call the students in their year groups on a weekly basis. This will replace the regular check in which would happen in person normally. AHOB will ask about the following:

  • Access to schoolwork including internet quality and connectivity
  • How are things at home?
  • Any questions for us or teachers?
  • Conversations around sharing of photos or stories in year level forums.

Our Assistant Heads of Boarding will create a OneNote page for each year level, for group chat and written communication with each other, their AHOB, and their year 12 Student Mentor.

All Year groups will be using Zoom for face to face meetings, which at this stage are scheduled for week 3, 6, and 9.

Online Tutoring

I am delighted to say that Ms Claire Lawler will continue to assist us in our Tutoring space, through an online and interactive tutoring platform for Boarders using One Note and Zoom. Boarders will have access to support through a tutor, and parents will have a point of call for academic concerns and queries, whilst also being given the opportunity to monitor student’s progress and help support your daughter. This will be conducted through collaborative spaces such as One Note and video conferencing support through Zoom. The tutoring schedule will be emailed at the beginning of every week to Boarders, so that they can book in a tutoring time slot. The program will not only provide opportunities for academic assistance but preserve the overall wellbeing of Boarders during time away from school, by maintaining contact with Stuartholme.

Weekly Updates from International Students in Boarding House

We have eight International students from mainland China who have been unable to go home for the holidays. Stuartholme made the decision to keep these students in our Boarding House to keep them well and healthy. While they are in the Boarding House, the International Students will take turns to give an update to the wider Boarding Community of what’s happening in the Boarding House.

This holiday break is an opportunity for us all to stop and rest, to start to experience life in a very different fashion. For us here at school, life has been running at a million miles an hour, so I am also looking forward to some home time with my family over the Easter break.  I will be going home from Holy Thursday until the following weekend. Travelling over the border has never been a challenge but each and everyday rules and regulations change, so it is all part for the journey.

I hope you can engage with our Catholic faith over this Easter celebration time, as it is the pinnacle of our Church’s year. At this time, we remember the sacrifice of Jesus giving His life for us all, and we have at the heart of our Christian belief that He rose from the dead, and this invites us all to spread this Gospel message of Good News that we can all be saved. It is the message of hope, which I believe our world community can be enriched by at this time. This Easter break, and the public holidays, can allow us time to more reflectively engage with our faith, and to create more opportunities for us as family to gather and share our love for each other.

Stay safe and well and know that you are all very much at the forefront of our minds

Happy Easter

Karen Davies
Dean of Boarding

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Message from the Dean of Student Wellbeing

Holding a large amount of Gratitude The benefits of both gratitude and mindfulness to a person’s wellbeing are now scientifically proven. Both are integrated into …

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Message from the Dean of Student Wellbeing

Holding a large amount of Gratitude

The benefits of both gratitude and mindfulness to a person’s wellbeing are now scientifically proven. Both are integrated into the approach to wellbeing at Stuartholme.

Cultivating gratitude doesn’t cost any money and it certainly doesn’t take much time, but the benefits are enormous. Research reveals gratitude can have these seven key benefits:

  • Gratitude opens the door to more relationships.
  • Gratitude improves physical health.
  • Gratitude improves psychological health
  • Gratitude enhances empathy and reduces aggression.
  • Grateful people sleep better.
  • Gratitude improves self-esteem.
  • Gratitude increases mental strength.

As we embark on the Easter Break after a term characterised by unprecedented events, I asked our Principal and the Wellbeing Team to think about what they have to be thankful for.

I am pleased to share their reflections below and encourage you to create the space to engage in this thinking with your own families in the next little while.

Reflections from our Principal and the Wellbeing Team

I am grateful for the creativity and comradery in the Stuartholme community at this time. – Kristen Sharpe (Principal)

What I am most grateful for is the friendship and laughter that keeps me uplifted at a time we may only see negative aspects and the support of a caring community, large and small, that works together. – Margaret Devlin (Leader of Student Wellbeing – Year 12)

I am grateful for my loving, supportive family who are always there when times are tough, standing together, and always there to enjoy the good times, the shared activities, the laughs.

I am grateful for being part of the Stuartholme community where I feel so at home, safe, supported and energised, and where the driving force is love and care for others.

I am grateful for my friends, the people with whom I can share stories, relax and laugh with, and who are always ready to listen. – Marilyn Byron (Leader of Student Wellbeing – Year 10)

I am grateful for the precious people in my life who I can laugh with. Humour is often a refuge for humanity. – Deb Lonsdale-Walker (Dean of Student Wellbeing).

As we head towards the Easter break, I am grateful for the opportunity to spend quality time with my husband and 3 daughters. – Jeanette MacGregor (Leader of Student Wellbeing – Year 7)

I am grateful for many things – my health, my children, my home, my friends, my work, my pets.  I am grateful to all the people guiding us through this pandemic – the doctors, nurses, scientists, public servants and politicians.  I am grateful for blue skies and warm days.  I am grateful for clean drinking water and green trees.  I am grateful for technology that allows us to keep connected with each other.  I am grateful for the love we show each other through this unusual time. – Pierina Curties (Leader of Student Wellbeing – Year 9)

At this time I am grateful for my photos and fond memories I can reflect on from my most recent trip to Vietnam and Cambodia. Some of these memories include the various connections I made with people along the way from different cultural backgrounds, as well as my hiking adventures and exploring all that nature has to offer.  – Natalie Morgan (Psychologist)

I am grateful for my network of kind, funny and wonderful close friends as well as the stack of books I have to keep me company during the upcoming house-bound Easter holidays. – Eloise Conrad (Psychologist)

I am grateful for this time so that I am able to enjoy the small and free pleasures of life – the love of my family, the comfort of my home, the joy of listening to music, the warmth of the sun, the hope of tomorrow.Louise Meehan (Leader of Student Wellbeing – Year 11)

I am grateful for my dog’s wagging tail every day when he sees me walk in the door when I get home from work. It brings a massive smile to my face. – Sue Harris (Leader of Student Wellbeing – Year 8)

I pray that you may each rejoice in the miracle, the gift and the promise that Easter brings and look forward to connecting with you and supporting your families in Term Two.

References

https://www.forbes.com/sites/amymorin/2014/11/23/7-scientifically-proven-benefits-of-gratitude-that-will-motivate-you-to-give-thanks-year-round/#43383af6183c

Deb Lonsdale-Walker
Dean of Student Wellbeing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Message from the Commercial Director

Dear Parents and Caregivers,  The Australian Government has provided $20 million in Special Circumstances Funding to schools affected by ongoing drought conditions. The Minister for …

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Message from the Commercial Director

Dear Parents and Caregivers, 

The Australian Government has provided $20 million in Special Circumstances Funding to schools affected by ongoing drought conditions. The Minister for Education, the Hon Dan Tehan MP, announced that the Morrison Government would provide $10 million additional funding through the Special Circumstances Fund to support non-government schools facing financial hardship as a result of ongoing drought conditions.  

The funding round targeted schools with students from the 128 local government areas eligible as at November 2019 for assistance under the Australian Government’s Drought Communities Programme. It complements a range of initiatives in the package announced by the Government for drought-hit farmers, small businesses and rural towns. Many rural towns are doing it tough as a result of the drought and many schools have introduced fee relief and/or curtailed their operations to cope with this drastic situation. 

We are pleased to announce that Stuartholme School applied for this funding and has been awarded $106,532.00 to assist drought-affected families with fee relief.   

We understand that there are many families in our community who are experiencing hardship in these uncertain times for a range of reasons.  However, we hope that access to this funding will assist our drought-affected families. 

Families whose businesses and income have been impacted by the drought are invited to apply for a share of the drought-assistance by completing a bursary application  

How to apply: Please apply online for the 2020 Special Circumstances Funding – Drought Bursary at https://stuartholme.com/enrol/scholarships-bursaries/ 

Eligibility criteria: 

  • Daughter is currently enrolled at Stuartholme 
  • Income has been impacted by the drought 
  • Reside in an eligible local government area, as identified by the Government (see Appendix) 

We look forward to hearing from affected families and supporting you through these times. 

Applications close 1 May 2020 and successful applicants will be informed by 1 June 2020. 

Appendix  Eligible local government areas 

The following councils are identified by the Government as eligible based on need and the economic impact of drought in the region. 

The government assessed this using: 

  • rainfall deficiency data from the Bureau of Meteorology 
  • population and industry data – particularly reliance on agriculture 

The Government monitors drought conditions across the country and may add more councils depending on conditions. 

 

New South Wales 

Armidale Regional  Federation  Murrumbidgee 
Balranald  Forbes  Musellbrook 
Bathurst Regional  Gilgandra  Narrabri 
Bega Valley  Glen Innes Severn Shire  Narrandera 
Berrigan  Greater Hume  Narromine 
Bland  Gunnedah  Oberon 
Blayney  Gwydir  Parkes 
Bogan  Hay  Richmond Valley 
Bourke  Hilltops  Snowy Monaro 
Brewarrina  Inverell  Tamworth Regional 
Broken Hill  Junee  Temora 
Cabonne  Kempsey  Tenterfield 
Carrathool  Kyogle  Unincorporated Far West 
Central Darling  Lachlan  Upper Hunter 
Clarence Valley  Leeton  Upper Lachlan 
Cobar  Lismore  Uralla 
Coolamon  Lithgow  Walcha 
Coonamble  Lockhart  Walgett 
Cootamundra-Gundagai  Liverpool Plains  Warren 
Cowra  Mid-Western Regional  Warrumbungle 
Dubbo Regional  Moree Plains  Weddin 
Edward River  Murray River  Wentworth 

 

Northern Territory 

Barkly  Central Desert 

 

Queensland 

Balonne  Flinders  Quilpie 
Banana  Goondiwindi  Richmond 
Barcaldine  Lockyer Valley  Scenic Rim 
Barcoo  Longreach  Somerset 
Blackall Tambo  Maranoa  South Burnett 
Boulia  McKinlay  Southern Downs 
Bulloo  Murweh  Toowoomba 
Bundaberg  North Burnett  Western Downs 
Diamantina  Paroo  Winton 

 

South Australia 

Adelaide Plains  Kangaroo Island  Port Pirie City and District 
Alexandrina  Karoonda East Murray  Renmark Paringa 
Barossa  Kimba  Scenic Rim 
Barunga West  Light*  Southern Mallee 
Berri Barmera  Loxton Waikerie  Streaky Bay 
Ceduna  Mid Murray  Tatiara 
Clare and Gilbert Valleys  Mount Remarkable  The Coorong 
Cleve  Murray Bridge  Unincorporated Far North SA 
Copper Coast  Northern Areas  Wakefield 
Flinders Ranges  Orroroo/Carrieton  Wudinna 
Franklin Harbour  Peterborough  Yorke Peninsula 
Goyder     
     

 

Tasmania 

Break O Day  Devonport  Glamorgan Spring Bay 

 

Victoria 

Benalla  Glamorgan Spring Bay  Strathbogie 
Break O Day  Greater Shepparton  Swan Hill 
Buloke  Latrobe  Wangaratta 
Devonport  Mildura  Wellington 
East Gippsland  Moira  Yarriambiack 
Gannawarra  Pyrenees   

 

Western Australia 

Albany  Denmark  Lake Grace 
Beverley  Donnybrook-Balingup  Mingenew* 
Bridgetown-Greenbushes  Dumbleyung*  Moora 
Brookton*  Esperance  Nannup 
Broomhill-Tambellup  Gnowangerup  Narembeen* 
Bruce Rock*  Irwin  Pingelly 
Busselton  Jerramungup  Plantagenet 
Carnamah*  Katanning  Quairading 
Coorow  Kellerberrin  Ravensthorpe 
Corrigin  Kent*  Three Springs* 
Cranbrook  Kojonup  Wickepin* 
Dandaragan  Kulin*   

  

Laura Wedmaier
Commercial Director

 

 

The Stuartholme Morning Herald

The rundown Hey guys! We know nobody really asked, but trust us, you’re in for the read of a lifetime. With your help, the Cor …

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The Stuartholme Morning Herald

The rundown

Hey guys! We know nobody really asked, but trust us, you’re in for the read of a lifetime. With your help, the Cor Unum committee is planning on getting this up and running, turning it into the highlight of everyone’s week. In the future, we want this paper to be filled with fun stories about any of you or your mate’s achievements that can provide even a remote spark of entertainment for your Stuartholme sisters, especially if it is something that would have made Sophie proud.

Just like a real newspaper (except way less boring), we will have sections on all aspects of the school and for those of you who only read the paper for the comics, we will have those too! So stay tuned for any future editions of The Stuartholme Morning Herald and get keen to get involved in Stuartholme’s new student run newsletter.

STU at ho(l)me

After hours of discussion and sleepless nights, the Cor Unum committee have come up with some interesting ways to stay entertained during this unusual period of our lives. We know that some of you guys are probably just watching non-stop Netflix, not that there is anything wrong with that, but we thought we could provide some inspiration on how to fill your time:

  1. Yoga – start your spiritual journey to inner peace, or just take some time to move about
  2. Minecraft – it’s a classic and we all know it
  3. Puzzles – who doesn’t love a good puzzle
  4. Scrapbooking – relive your fave memories (so cute)
  5. Baking – if your self-isolating, may as well eat yummy food while you’re at it
  6. Learn a new language – duolingo is calling your name
  7. Build a tree house – or just build a fort, we all know it’s fun
  8. Sewing – fix all your uniforms while you can
  9. Dance – practice your moves for the next DOF
  10. Read the dictionary – vocabulary is key
  11. Learn to backflip – just don’t break anything
  12. Walk your pets – perfect bonding time with your friends
  13. Gardening – plant some fun stuff, or just look busy outside
  14. Become a gamer girl – it’s in your DNA

You can watch our video here

The Man, The Myth, The Legend, The Real Immy Fraser

 2020 Cor Unum Head; a Stuartholme girl making Sophie proud with her radical renegading and drama dedication. 

Santa Claus 31/03/20

As Immy tiktokked her heart out with the grade 7 girls of Stuartholme I just had to ask our school captain a few burning questions. Initially, I was blocked by her body guards, I mean I get it, she’s an important woman around these parts. But out of the kindness of her heart she took a few minutes to talk to a humble reporter from The Stuartholme Morning Herald. As we sat and chatted on the blue benches of the year 7 area I realised that Immy was much more than a dancing queen who loved to bust out some of Stuartholme’s most iconic moves on Dance Off Friday. Immy is also a smart cookie, with her favourite subject being drama she provides the artsie pizzaz that the Cor Unum committee would have been lacking without her. During our conversation Immy also told me that she ‘loved chillin’ with her axolotl, Clive’. I mean you have to be a pretty cool chick to have an axolotl, but calling it Clive is an entirely unprecedented level of wow that I didn’t even know existed. As we sat there chatting, I realised that although Immy is super inspiring with her amazing speeches during assembly and her cool pets that very few other people have, she is really just a regular Stuartholme girl that loves a laugh and a dance. Just when I thought I had heard all that I could about Immy she told me that her favourite sport was water polo. I mean I don’t know about you, but before I came to Stuartholme I didn’t even know what that was, did they put horses in the pool, I just don’t get how it works. As we sat there, surrounded by our best bush turkey friends listening in, the bell went for fifth period. We walked to class and I realised that our school is in safe hands, I mean this girl’s got it all covered, with her trusty Cor Unum committee by her side she is sure to make Sophie proud.

 

Elite Sportswoman – More Like Master Chef

Get to know Hayley Bowden, the farm girl with too many talents to count.

Gossip Girl 31/03/20

I sat in my room talking to the pocket rocket that is Hayley Bowden, during this time I had two extremely enlightening revelations. The first of which being that my room was a dump and I really needed to clean it, but the second was far more profound. Hayley Bowden really is a weapon. As I sat there yarning to the reincarnation of Einstein herself I realised many things about the esteemed member of the Cor Unum committee. Hayley is a studious example for our younger Stuartholme sisters, with her favourite subjects being Geography and English. However, when interviewing Hayley for her piece in the Stuartholme Morning Herald, it became clear to me that she was much more than just a big brain. When asked about her hobbies I was initially disappointed to hear Hayley say that she didn’t really have any, maybe she wasn’t as cool as she once seemed. However, redemption followed shortly after when Hayley told me that she ‘can make some mean French toast’, I mean who doesn’t love French toast. Also subtly flexing that ‘until our season was cut short I was a proud devotee to the firsts volleyball team’. Not only was Hayley a volleyball champ but she is a bit of a beast on the netball court and a speed demon on the touch field, what can’t this girl do? But it doesn’t end there, Hayley is also one of those few crazy people that enjoys horror movies so watch out she is probably after us all. Haha jk… unless. I must admit, when I first came across Hayley I was intimidated, I mean who wouldn’t be, she’s a giant. Rest assured, she is an easy going chick who is happy for a chat, especially considering she did distance education (but we won’t hold that against her). All I can say is, Hayley is definitely making Sophie proud of one of Stuartholme’s leaders for 2020.

 

Meg Todd – The Underdog

The silent assassin making her mark on Stuartholme

Pitbull 31/03/20

Meg Zoomed in from her humble abode in Toowong, during our chat there was much that I learnt about the enthusiastic member of Toohey house. Meg started at Stuartholme in Year 9, originally living in Dubai. After she became accustomed to the constant ‘is that a Dubai thing’ jokes, Meg truly started to discover her true potential as a Stuartholme girl. Blowing everyone away as she tore up the touch field and showed us all how to really play soccer, there seems to be nothing that Meg couldn’t do. Surely she has a kryptonite, there has to be something that she isn’t good at. As I continued to interview the prestigious member of the Cor Unum committee I tried to uncover Meg’s weakness. I mean, a blind man could see that she was born a dancer, have you seem those aerobics moves at Dance Off? When asked about her favourite subject she answered that she ‘loves health and PE’, two solid answers. Not only is Meg a sporty gal but she’s also smart. To top it off, Meg’s an involved member of liturgy committee who loves a good Sunday night boarders mass. As I thanked Meg for her time chatting to us here are the Stuartholme Morning Herald I had the opportunity to think and reflect on all that she told me. I sat there spinning in my chair for hours on end, embracing my inner Sherlock Holmes as I tried to uncover the secret weakness of Meg Todd. After hours of contemplation, I finally had it. Meg’s impaired vision, if anyone stole her glasses she wouldn’t have much fun reading what was on the whiteboard. Really, I was grasping at straws. So I gave in, maybe Meg really was just a good person, a reputable Stuartholme sister who is making Sophie proud. The big thing that I took away from my chat with Meg is that Stuartholme’s got nothing to worry about with Meg showing us how it’s done.

 

The Lunatic Who is Supposed to Help Run the Show

Lucy Baker, a Stuartholme girl dedicated to Making Sophie Proud.

Mr Incredible 31/03/20

As Lucy drove me into town in her family’s old Prado I began to question the abilities of the Glen Innes testing officer who had allowed such a lunatic on the road. My heart was in my throat until we finally arrived at woollies, where we patrolled the aisles and slowly filled the shopping list as I tried to understand the true nature of Lucy Baker. I was beginning to wonder how she was even remotely capable of being a member of the Cor Unum committee when she continued to trip over her own feet walking around the shops. Lucy, picking up a handful of apples, told me that her two favourite subjects were Physics and Modern History, maybe she was a little bit smarter than she looked – I was still on the fence with that one. As we cruised through the aisles she also talked about how she ‘loved a good game of tennis’, especially with the boarders on a weekend and how even though she didn’t appear to be the biggest fan of rowing, somewhere deep down there was some love for the sport. As we were checking out, Lucy realised that we had forgotten the milk and she told me she ‘would be sleeping with the dogs’ if we returned home with none, so she ran as fast as the wind and her stumpy legs would take her. Back in a flash, puffing like she had just run a marathon, she insisted that she ‘went to core’ as she scanned the milk. We finally left the woollies car park, with Lucy chewing my ear off about all of her numerous pets I realised that she wasn’t as incompetent as I once thought. After we arrived home safely I realised that, maybe, Lucy was alright at this whole Cor Unum business. With the help of her Stuartholme sisters, she was doing a half-decent job of leading our school in 2020.

 

Most embarrassing moment at Stuartholme:

Immy:
I’d have to say the whole period of years 7 through to 9 were pretty embarrassing looking back at it. Second place comes that time on year 7 camp, on my birthday, when I got stuck on the flying fox for a considerably long time and my camp instructor didn’t know how to get me down because it was his first day.

Hayley:

My most embarrassing moment was definitely last year at the year 11 soirees when my TMG performed Umbrella by Rihanna. We had come up with a great routine and were determined we had a real shot at winning. We even had the idea of using umbrellas in our soiree, but apparently this was not such a great decision. When we actually performed our soiree, we were all cramped on the stage and the umbrellas had a mind of their own. People were getting hit with umbrellas left, right and centre and Ms Moran was our only saving grace, strutting across the stage to finish the disaster it was. People were laughing, staring at us, and our TMG was just cringing as we sat back down. The best part is we still managed to beat Parker coming 5th overall, which they were not exactly happy about.

Meg:
Throwing up at cross country? This is literally the only one coming to my head despite knowing everything I do is embarrassing.

Lucy:

I only started at Stu in year 8 and about three weeks into me Stuartholme experience I decided that it would be good idea to fall down the entire set of stairs from B floor to A floor. To make matters worse, it was just before chapel so every man and his dog got to witness grade 8 Lucy with her dress at her ankles role down the entire flight of stairs. When I got my biggest worry was if I had broken my watch (I hadn’t if you were wondering). This cute little experience haunted me for a long time and I still walk down those steps extra slow so I don’t do the same thing again.

 

 

The great debate: Nicki Minaj or Cardi B

Immy:
In 2013 Nicki Minaj said, ‘I gotta keep an eye out for Selena’, and I live by that. Hearing this line when I was 13 truly opened my eyes and I haven’t closed them since. I will always stand on team Nicki. Barbie tings

Hayley:

Both are very strong, empowered women but the real question is, if their music isn’t played at Dance off Friday then how relevant are they? Nicki Minaj invented the rap game and it’s for this reason that Cardi B will always live in her shadow. End of story.

Meg:
Micki Ninaj.

Lucy:

I have to admit, I’m no expert in the word of female rappers but in my humble opinion Nick Minaj just has that extra something that Cardi just doesn’t seem to have. Call it talent, I don’t know. Plus, there is a belting vine about Ninki Minjaj.

Comics/Memes

 

Contact

Obviously, the holidays are coming up but after a break from school we would love to share everyone’s stories so if you guys have anything that you would like to share just email any of the Cor Unum committee and they can get your story out.

Our emails are:

frasim20@stuartholme.com

toddme20@stuartholme.com

bowdha20@stuartholme.com

bakelu20@stuartholme.com

Finally, we’ve made a special video for all our Stuartholme sister, you can watch our video here

Have a good week girls, we hope you enjoyed the first ever edition of the Stuartholme Morning Herald xox

Science Snippets

Dear Stuartholme community, This newsletter science snippet has been written by Ebony Anderson, one our Year 11 UQ Science Ambassadors. The ambassadors discussed at our …

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Science Snippets

Dear Stuartholme community,

This newsletter science snippet has been written by Ebony Anderson, one our Year 11 UQ Science Ambassadors. The ambassadors discussed at our last meeting together the need to ensure that people are reading information from credible sources and Ebony chose to write about the scientific knowledge we know about vaccines and how they work. I hope you find her article informative.

In light of the current coronavirus pandemic, we thought that you might find it interesting to develop some basic knowledge around vaccines. Looking into the process of development, addressing some myths raised about vaccines by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and looking at the progress scientists have made in developing a COVID 19 vaccination.

Vaccines are substances commonly injected into the muscle to stimulate the production of antibodies and provide immunity against one or several diseases, without inducing the disease. They are typically made by taking viruses or bacteria and weakening them so that they can’t reproduce or replicate themselves. This way when people are given vaccines they are exposed to enough of the virus or bacteria to develop immunity, but not enough to make them sick.

There are four main ways that scientists weaken viruses and bacteria to make vaccines:

  1. The virus genes are modified by a technique called cell culture adaptation, which prevents the virus from replicating. Because viruses can still, to some extent, make copies of themselves after cell culture adaptation, they are often referred to as live vaccines (Please note however, that viruses are not organisms as they require a host cell to invade and instruct for its replication. They are unable to replicate on their own). This is how the measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella vaccines are made.
  2. Destroy the virus blueprint so that the virus can’t replicate at all, meaning the vaccination is not live. This is how the polio vaccine is made.
  3. Use only a part of the virus or bacteria. This is how the Hib, hepatitis B, and (in part) pertussis vaccines are made. Because the viral or bacterial genes are not present in the vaccine, the viruses or bacteria can’t replicate.
  4. Some bacterial diseases are not caused by replicating but by manufacturing harmful proteins called toxins. For example, bacteria like diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (whooping cough) all cause disease by producing toxins. To make vaccines against these bacteria, toxins are purified and killed with chemicals (such as formaldehyde). Once again, preventing the bacteria from reproducing because bacterial genes are not part of the vaccine.

Vaccine development typically begins in a research laboratory in a university, medical organisation or biotechnology company. Scientists in these laboratories are commonly funded by the government or private foundations. These scientists often spend years researching whether their ideas work, developing reagents and tests to measure their progress, and finally, using animals to test their ideas.

Once an idea appears promising, it must be tested in a small number of healthy adults. This is done in order to test if the vaccine generates the expected immune response and if it is safe.

This process is like the one that is currently taking place in about 40 companies and academic institutions around the world, in the race to develop a vaccine for Covid-19. UQ is one of these academic institutions and are the only Australian organisation tasked by the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations to attempt this project. UQ was lucky enough to receive funding of up to $17 million from federal and state governments towards their research. They say that this funding could help cut the timeline for an effective vaccine for COVID-19 by six months from the original 18 months. At least 4 of the 40 global organisations already have candidates they have begun testing on animals. The first of these, produced by Boston-based biotech firm Moderna, will enter human trials imminently. However, even if these tests go well and a vaccine is found, there are many barriers before global immunisation is feasible. That is a conversation for another article.

 

The World Health Organisations busted MYTHs about vaccines

As we are all aware, there are speculations around vaccinations and the potential health concerns surrounding them. We live in a world where we receive so much information, from so many sources and it is often hard to know who to trust and what to believe. Whilst looking into vaccinations we thought it would be interesting to look at some claims that the WHO has published as ‘myths’ and addressed, with evidence to back up their accusations.

 

Claimed ‘MYTH’ Evidence
Vaccines cause autism
  • There is no evidence of a link between measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine (or any other vaccine) and autism or autistic disorders.
  • A Danish study with 537 303 children in 2002 provided strong evidence against any link between MMR vaccine and autism. For all these children there was no link between the age at the time of vaccination, the time since vaccination or the date of vaccination and the development of autistic disorder.
Vaccines contain mercury, which is dangerous
  • Thiomersal is an organic, ethylmercury-containing compound added to some vaccines as a preservative.
  • Mercury is a naturally occurring element that is found in air, water and soil.
  • If used in vaccines, the amount of Thiomersal is very small.
  • There is no evidence to suggest that the amount of thiomersal used in any vaccines poses a health risk.
More than one vaccine at a time could increase the risk of harmful side effects and could overload the child’s immune system
  • Scientific evidence shows that giving several vaccines at the same time has no negative effect on a child’s immune system.
  • A child is exposed to far more antigens from a common cold or sore throat than they are from vaccines.
Diseases will not spread if we just ensure proper hygiene and sanitation
  • Many infections can spread regardless of how clean we are.
  • Vaccination prevents diseases that have become uncommon, such as polio and measles.
It is better to be immunised through disease than through vaccines
  • The immune response to vaccines is similar to the one produced by natural infection.
  • The price paid for immunity through natural infection can be detrimental.
Vaccines can contain microchips enabling governments or others to track the whereabouts of an immunised person
  • This is technically impossible and doesn’t take place.
  • Vaccines are produced in a very restricted setting.

Source: WHO Regional Office for Europe 2015

 

References

Children’s Hospital. (2014, November 20). Making Vaccines: Process of Vaccine Development. Retrieved from https://www.chop.edu/centers-programs/vaccine-education-center/making-vaccines/process-vaccine-development

Centre for Disease Control. (2016, June 07). Common Vaccine Safety Questions and Concerns. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/concerns/index.html

How Are Vaccines Made and Why Do They Work? (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.pkids.org/immunizations/how_they_work.html (Note: This source may possibly be biased as it is a non-profit organisation run by parents and not medical experts).

Spinney, L. (2020, March 31). Coronavirus vaccine: When will it be ready? Retrieved from https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/31/coronavirus-vaccine-when-will-it-be-ready

Subramanian, S. (2020, March 27). ‘It’s a razor’s edge we’re walking’: Inside the race to develop a coronavirus vaccine. Retrieved from https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/27/inside-the-race-to-develop-a-coronavirus-vaccine-covid-19

I also ask students to ensure that when using newsletter articles to check that the information being used comes from a research article (E.g. Are there direct quotes from a published journal? Or do they reference a credible journal?) and preferably that the author is a science journalist.

University of Queensland. (2020, March 26). $17m shot in the arm for UQ’s COVID-19 vaccine research. Retrieved from https://science.uq.edu.au/article/2020/03/17m-shot-arm-uq’s-covid-19-vaccine-research.

World Health Organisation. (2019, September 19).  Vaccines. Retrieved from https://www.who.int/topics/vaccines/en/

 

Many thanks to Ebony for writing this informative article. It is very important that students critically evaluate the credibility of sources of information and this is a skill that we focus on in our science program.

Wishing you a safe and restful Easter break.

Kind regards,

Wendy Macdonald (Leader of Learning – Science)

Honour Pockets

The Honour Pockets Committee look forward to supporting this important initiative in 2020. A copy of the criteria for this year and the associated timeframes …

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Honour Pockets

The Honour Pockets Committee look forward to supporting this important initiative in 2020. A copy of the criteria for this year and the associated timeframes will be shared with families in Term Two.

HONOUR POCKETS COMMITTEE 2020

Year 12 Field Trip – Southern Cross Austereo

During Week 7, Year 12 Business attended Southern Cross Austereo, home of stations MMM and Hit105.  Students had the opportunity to meet the breakfast teams …

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Year 12 Field Trip – Southern Cross Austereo

During Week 7, Year 12 Business attended Southern Cross Austereo, home of stations MMM and Hit105.  Students had the opportunity to meet the breakfast teams for both stations and learn about the branding strategies and target markets for both brands.

As part of our study of mature businesses in hostile competitive environments, students had a presentation based on insight and ideation, the anatomy of a campaign and the role of research insights. The key takeaway was to be ‘first of mind’ in terms of brand awareness. Students used this primary research for the Internal Assessment during Term 1.

Sally Adams
Leader of Learning – Business

 

Congratulating our Big 3 winners

We recently congratulated our students who represented Stuartholme in the BIG 3 CaSSSA Carnivals in 2019 – Swimming, Athletics and Cross Country. We think that …

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Congratulating our Big 3 winners

We recently congratulated our students who represented Stuartholme in the BIG 3 CaSSSA Carnivals in 2019 – Swimming, Athletics and Cross Country.

We think that is an awesome achievement and they’re now part of an exclusive group of student athletes, so were rewarded with a T-shirt. We will continue to make this a tradition for 2020 and beyond.

In lieu of a presentation on assembly, we made the attached fun video which you can see on our Facebook page.

Congratulations to:

Edie Campbell
Gretta Johnson
Lily Hunter
Ella Cole
Molly Cowan
Sophie Kathage
Grace McIntosh (absent from video)
Alex O’Brien
Georgina Twigg

Social Justice opportunities through STU@HOME

As a Sacred Heart school, Stuartholme has a deep commitment to the principles and practices of social justice. We encourage our young women to educate …

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Social Justice opportunities through STU@HOME

As a Sacred Heart school, Stuartholme has a deep commitment to the principles and practices of social justice. We encourage our young women to educate themselves on issues of concern in our world so that may act with wise freedom, working towards fair and positive change in society.

Stuartholme strongly encourages the intellectual growth of our young women and also their spiritual and moral development. We believe we cannot allow our current situation to interrupt this growth and development and so we are excited to launch our online social justice program on Stu@Home.

Through this platform students will be able to further explore the Sacred Heart charism of education and mission. They will develop their knowledge, acquire skills and be encouraged to action for justice. Participation will allow acknowledgement of their social justice hours.

Opportunities in social justice in Stu@Home include:

  • Stu Storytime
  • Fortnightly JPIC meetings
  • Development of products for our social enterprise – P4P
  • Key Word Sign tutorials and introduction to Auslan webinars
  • Online workshops with guest speakers covering the topics including refugees, diffability, environmental sustainability
  • Free online social justice courses

We encourage Stuartholme parents and students to visit social justice on Stu@Home to continue engagement with the co-curricular program and to help preserve connectiveness and wellbeing within our community. The social justice page can be found in Mission, just click the Mission tile on the Stu@Home homepage and you will be directed to us.

Stuartholme’s focus goal for 2020 is Building Community as a Christian Value. When our world feels isolated and insular, this can be challenging. Despite this we look forward to reinforcing the strength of our community and developing the knowledge, generosity and kindness of our students.

Claire Lawler
Social Justice Coordinator

STU Virtual Fitness Club

As part of our STU@HOME model, we are also launching our STU Virtual Fitness Club which will start on day 1 Term 2. Students will …

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STU Virtual Fitness Club

As part of our STU@HOME model, we are also launching our STU Virtual Fitness Club which will start on day 1 Term 2.

Students will have access to a range of programs to ensure they keep up their physical fitness. The site includes a Virtual Fitness Schedule with activities from yoga, running, circuit and mindfulness to name a few.