In this issue

Lions Youth of the Year

Science Snippets

Update from the Careers Counsellor

Centenary Book and merchandise for sale

Key Dates

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Key Dates

Tues 31 MarchLast day of Term 1
Wed 1-Fri 3 AprilStudent Free Days
Fri 10 AprilGood Friday
Sun 12 AprilEaster Sunday
Mon 13 AprilEaster Monday
Mon 20 AprilBoarders return
Boarder Parent Network Meeting 11.30-1pm (TBC)
Parents of Stuartholme Meeting 6pm (TBC)
Tues 21 AprilAll classes start
School fees due
Sat 25 AprilANZAC Day

Message from the Principal

Dear Parents, Caregivers and Friends, I would like to start my newsletter article with an overwhelming expression of gratitude. Thank you to our parents who …

From the Principal
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Message from the Principal

Dear Parents, Caregivers and Friends,

I would like to start my newsletter article with an overwhelming expression of gratitude. Thank you to our parents who are offering support and assistance in varied ways for our girls. Thank you to my staff who are soldiering on, keeping cool heads while managing many unanswerable questions. And an unreserved thank you to our beautiful girls, who have expressed compassion and empathy to me in the corridors, at the café, in TMs, in every exchange. You energise and inspire me.

The purpose of this newsletter article is to provide you with a succinct summary of the exhaustive amount of information. Stuartholme School is working tirelessly to access and implement the Government and Health authority’s advice. In providing this summary, I intend to be short and sharp!

Key messages include:

  • Stuartholme School remains open
  • Boarders have been encouraged to leave early following the National Cabinet media release
  • Term 1 at Stuartholme finishes on Tuesday 31 March 2020
  • 1-3 April 2020 are student free days – staff will continue working
  • Year 7 – 10 examinations are cancelled, effective Monday 23 March
  • Year 11 – 12 examinations are postponed pending advice from the QCAA
  • A “Learn from Home” phase will only be enacted if we cease face-to-face learning for over 3 days
  • All school events that are not teaching and learning have been cancelled to the end of May
  • This global health crisis will continue for 10-20 weeks, this is a marathon not a sprint

 

What will happen if the school closes?

There are two scenarios under which the school would need to close.

  1. Short-term closure due to someone in our community testing positive to COVID-19. This closure would only be for one to two days while the school is cleaned, and contact tracing is undertaken. Once the contact group have been identified, everyone else returns to school to resume face to face learning.
  2. Federal Government forces schools to close. In the event the school is closed for a long period of time, the school will send out communication which will detail how learning will continue. Stuartholme staff will continue to work. Learn from home model will be implemented.

Over this last week, I have spoken to staff and students about COVID 19 and how Stuartholme is moving forward. My overriding message is to be strong, calm and compassionate. If this is the global crisis of my time, I intend to be capable and strong, with the biggest heart I can manage! We are agile, able and ready to respond when called upon. The irony of our centennial year being the year of community building while being instructed by the government to promote social distancing, we are called to think laterally, critically and compassionately. Physical distancing is an act of love, not an act of fear. We want to stay strong and healthy to ensure the safety of our elderly and vulnerable members of our families and our community.

Stuartholme is well positioned in our sense of community and our Cor Unum spirit.

We are well positioned to facilitate learning from home with our resources and our teaching capabilities.

When this global crisis ends, we want to be stronger, more capable and most importantly we want to maintain and grow our compassionate Cor Unum spirit.

I thought it appropriate to share a prayer:

Merciful God,

 

Lover of the human race,

nurture us in this time of crisis.

Grant wisdom and courage to our leaders.

Watch over all medical people

as they tend the sick and work for a cure.

Animate in us a sense of solidarity beyond all isolation.

If our doors are closed, let our hearts be open.

May the power of your love

Inspire us to love one another,

destroy the virus of fear,

and ensure hope may never die.

In our service of others,

may we go forth spreading compassion and peace to all.

Through Christ our Lord,

Amen.

Take care and God Bless,

Kristen Sharpe
Principal

 

 

 

 

Message from the Deputy Principal

Building staff capacity – the key to sustaining our outstanding results In my first article to the school community I shared the solid results of …

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Message from the Deputy Principal

Building staff capacity – the key to sustaining our outstanding results

In my first article to the school community I shared the solid results of Stuartholme being achieved by our young people.

The research clearly shows a key success factor in sustaining teaching and learning success is the capacity of our teaching staff.

Stuartholme is a lighthouse example in strengthening the professional capacity of staff and I thought parents would appreciate some insights into this investment.

Strength in our staff professional learning program resides in the model which enables staff to engage in continuous self-knowledge through collaboration with their peers to improve learning outcomes.

Supporting students to become thinkers and learners

Program delivery centres on targeted workshops delivered by Dr Ron Ritchhart, senior researcher at Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education, and skilling staff in this ground-breaking work which places at its core students becoming thinkers and learners.

Timetabled Professional learning communities support the process of educational innovation enhancing cross-organisational relationships and ensuring a safe forum to solve complex problems with a dedicated focus on teaching and learning. Thus, the program at Stuartholme has successfully transformed classrooms into places designed to develop thinking and understanding instead of merely completing work.

Being on the front foot in responding to challenges

The impact on teaching and learning as a result of the program is that relationships across departments have been established, collaborative practice has been enabled, self-reflection supported and staff well-positioned to make sense about how to respond to challenges inherent in a modern, global context.

The current unprecedented environment as a result of COVID-19 is a prime example of a modern challenge. Our school community will navigate this seamlessly owing to the work achieved in the teaching and learning space at our school.

These outcomes are indicative of the educational change leadership required for sustainability and for teachers to respond to the needs of a 21st century classroom. Following implementation of this educational innovation, hard data on student outcome is evidence of further success where the school is ranked in the higher echelons of Catholic Girls Schools.

Notably, whilst the Harvard supported Cultures of Thinking approach has a strong international uptake, Stuartholme is the first girls’ school in Queensland to work with this university.

This bespoke program has also supported broader systemic changes being implemented at a state level through the sharing of key learnings with other educators in State and National Forums.

Stuartholme can therefore look forward to ongoing success in terms of our outstanding results. I look forward to keeping in touch with parents about our work in building the capacity of all staff within our community and the positive impacts on your daughter’s academic outcomes.

Best wishes,

Daniel Crump
Deputy Principal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Message from the Dean of Mission

Repentance, Reconciliation & Forgiveness They say that Lent is a time of repentance. Repentance is when someone reflects on an aspect of their life with …

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Message from the Dean of Mission

Repentance, Reconciliation & Forgiveness

They say that Lent is a time of repentance. Repentance is when someone reflects on an aspect of their life with feelings of regret or remorse, and sets about to make things right. In reflecting on this dimension of our faith with the students, we tend to frame it as a change of heart for the better, which resonates with our Sacred Heart charism, where we are called to develop a discerning attitude and heart that learns through experience[1].

The learnings that bring about repentance are a key ingredient to forgiveness and reconciliation, which is the fruit of a change heart. To bring this important dimension of our faith alive, today we celebrated a liturgy of reconciliation in our TMGs. Whilst somewhat distinct to the sacrament of reconciliation, this liturgy provided a space for the students to reflect and identify situations in need of healing, forgiveness and reconciliation in their own lives.

Why would we choose to participate in such an act here at Stuartholme?

Peace, Harmony & Healing

Forgiveness is a call of the Gospel. Stories such as the Prodigal Son[2] reveal as much, where we  glimpse the abundant mercy and forgiveness of our God, revealed through the embrace of the forgiving father to his wayward son. As Christians, we are called to do the same. Forgiveness also builds and strengthens relationships, bringing peace and harmony to situations of conflict and hurt. And forgiveness heals, where we let go of any pain or resentment towards others, providing us with an inner freedom through a fresh start.

It is also important to acknowledge that forgiveness requires a deep humility, as we confront the ways in which we may not have been our best selves, and set about making amends. With this kind of approach to life, we grow in wisdom and understanding of ourselves and those we are in relationship with.

As we continue on this lenten journey to Easter, let us be conscious of our need to forgive and be forgiven. After all forgiveness, given and received, is ultimately an act of grace and love.

Peace and blessings for the weeks ahead,

Justin Golding

Dean of Mission

 

[1] Sacred Heart Education Goal – Personal growth in an atmosphere of wise freedom.

[2] Luke 15:11-32

 

 

 

 

Message from the Dean of Student Wellbeing

Our Stuartholme Psychologists – valuable members of the Wellbeing Team Our school psychologists Ms Eloise Conrad and Ms Natalie Morgan are valuable professional support staff …

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Message from the Dean of Student Wellbeing

Our Stuartholme Psychologists – valuable members of the Wellbeing Team

Our school psychologists Ms Eloise Conrad and Ms Natalie Morgan are valuable professional support staff who contribute in a significant way to the creation of the ‘Stuartholme Village’.

In 2020, these professional staff will also contribute to my newsletter article in order to provide support to parents. I am pleased to provide their advice below about how to assist young people at home to cope with COVID-19 Anxiety.

Assisting Young People to Cope with COVID-19 Anxiety

We as a community are currently provided with a constant stream of information regarding COVID-19 every day through the media. The following information has a focus on providing support for parents and families to help students understand and manage anxiety related to COVID-19 and its uncertainties. It is important that if-needed, students take a break from news and/or social media.

Dr Michael Carr-Gregg (Child and Adolescent Psychologist) recently communicated the following video to parents through the SchoolTV resource: https://schooltv.me/wellbeing_news/special-report-coronavirus. Main points discussed in the video are as follows:

  1. Keep it simple and factual: parents should be the purveyors of hope.
  2. Reassure young people that most people who are diagnosed with COVID-19 only get a mild illness and fully recover within a few weeks. Explain the main symptoms and encourage young people to tell you if they’re feeling unwell.
  3. Explain what is being done to protect them (via government restrictions and health care).
  4. Embrace the opportunity to explore and learn new things together (e.g. how our bodies fight viruses).
  5. Encourage self-efficacy and good hygiene practices.
  6. Stick to routines – this is really important, especially when self-isolating.
  7. Know the signs of anxiety or that your young person may not be coping. These could include: irritability, being overly clingy, changes in sleep/eating behaviours, issues focussing and problems with memory.

Further readings and support:

 

Support available while you are at home

Phone and online services:

  • Youth Beyond Blue: 1300224636
    • Beyond Blue: online chat is available 3pm to 12 am
  • Kids Helpline: 1800551800
  • eHeadspace: 1800650890
  • CYMHS (child and youth mental health service) Acute Response Team: 30682555

Face-face appointments:

  • See your GP who can refer you to a Psychologist
  • Psychologists are able to see you in person or via eHealth

For Parents: 

  • Parent line: 1300301300    8 am – 10 pm 7 days a week
  • Lifeline: 131114
  • Mindspot Clinic: 1800614434  Online and phone support for anxiety and depression
  • Beyond Blue: 1300224636 beyondblue.org.au
  • childrens.health.qld.gov.au

Emergency Support

In the event of a mental health emergency, or if you are at immediate risk of harm to yourself or others, please contact emergency services on 000 or present to Queensland’s Children’s Hospital Accident and Emergency Department.

Eloise Conrad & Natalie Morgan (School Psychologists)

 

The Stuartholme Way – Stand up to Bullying!

This week at school we have been celebrating the National Day of Action Against Bullying and Violence which will take place nationally later this year. Ms Harris, the Leader of Student Wellbeing – Year 8, the Year 8 Teacher Mentor Team and students have worked very hard to raise awareness about this important issue.

The theme for 2020 is “Take Action Together”. To promote the idea of “Taking Action Together”, our students have worn wrist bands or ribbons for the week.

Every student in the school has also completed the school’s bullying survey and engaged with a number of resources on the Bullying. No Way! Website. The Year 8 students as a class used authentic student voice to create class tips on responding to bullying and displayed these in their classrooms.

Our Strong and positive school culture

Stuartholme has a very strong and positive school culture promoting positive relationships and a clear policy to sustain this.

To make this policy accessible to students, we proudly display The Stuartholme Way – Stand up to Bullying! statement in every Teacher Mentor Group room.  This statement articulates what bullying is and provides advice about the role every girl can play in continuing to create a safe and happy school environment.

The Student Representative Council remain a key forum for consultation on action to be taken in this space. Based on their advice, The Stuartholme Way – Stand Up to Bullying electronic mailbox was established and is located at standuptobullyingatstuartholme.com to deal discreetly with any reports. Anonymous reports cannot be accepted. A real mailbox is also located in Student Reception.

 

Deb Lonsdale-Walker
Dean of Student Wellbeing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Message from the Careers Counsellor

Hi everyone, I hope you’ve been keeping well. As I’m sure you’re aware, some upcoming activities that I have shared with you may be cancelled …

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Message from the Careers Counsellor

Hi everyone,

I hope you’ve been keeping well.

As I’m sure you’re aware, some upcoming activities that I have shared with you may be cancelled due to COVID-19.

For this reason, this week I’ll be sharing a range of online resources and competitions that your daughters may be interested in exploring.

Warm regards,

Mr Tom Lillyman
Careers Counsellor

Competitions

QCT 2020 Photo Competition

The Queensland College of Teachers and Schoolzine are giving you and your school the chance to win a share of $9000 in cash prizes in the 2020 Photo Comp. To enter, simply capture an inspiring teaching moment, choose which category your image fits into (Teaching in the sunshine state, Collaborating with colleagues or Learning in action), get the necessary permissions and complete an online entry form. Entries close on Wednesday 8 April.

ATOM Photo Comp

The ATOM Photo Comp is an initiative of Australian Teachers of Media (ATOM). It provides Australian and New Zealand student and adult photographers with an opportunity to submit a set of three photographs adhering to the theme Fragility.  Find out more information about the theme here. The competition has five age-group categories: Lower Primary (years prep-3), Upper Primary (years 4-6), Lower Secondary (years 7-9), Upper Secondary (years 10-12) and Open. The prize includes a Ted’s Camera gift voucher valued at $500 for the primary categories, $750 and for the secondary categories and $1000 for the Open category. Entries are open now and close on 9 April, 2020. For more information or to enter visit the ATOM Photo Comp website.

International Film Scoring Competition

The Indie Gathering International Film Festival and Convention has two film scoring competitions for 2020. One is our standard TRAILER scoring. The second is a full SCENE. You may enter one competition or both, but you must register separately for two submissions if you compete in both. Each 1st place winner will then be in the running for BEST OVERALL SCORE (championship belt). Click here for more information and how to apply.

Writing competitions

Hatchlings (8 to 18 year olds) – Writing for the children’s and young adults’ markets. Eligibility: All writers/illustrators who are 8 – 18 years old (as at 4 April 2020) worldwide, who have not been published in book format within the CYA genres; All entries must have a parent or guardian’s details on the entry form; Contest entry may not be contracted or published in any form when entered. Entries close 4 April 2020.

Aspiring (Unpublished) Writing for the children’s and young adults’ markets. Eligibility: All writers/illustrators worldwide, who have not been published in book format within the CYA genres. This contest is also open to current published writers/illustrator worldwide who are either; published with one book in print within the CYA genres ONLY; OR Published in e-book format with one book within the CYA genres ONLY; OR Self-published with one book within the CYA genres ONLY; Published with books in print and e-book format in other genres; contest entry may not be contracted or published in any form when entered. Entries close 4 April 2020.

Exploration

Try out virtual work experience

Since large gatherings are out at the moment, you might want to try some virtual work experience activities on The Careers Department.

Experience jobs like:

  • Landscape designer
  • Web designer
  • Social media officer
  • UX/UI designer (User Experience/User Interface Designer)
  • Sports marketer
  • Journalist
  • Fashion buyer

If you don’t have an account yet, you can find instructions and the school password on the Careers page of my.Stuartholme.

Hear it from the horse’s mouth

Sometimes its hard to find someone who does the job you’re interested in to ask them your questions.

Conveniently, here are a bunch of phone interviews with professionals in different fields. Listen in to learn more about their careers, including how they got where they are now.

Event Coordinator

Agricultural Journalist

Herpetologist (reptile and amphibian expert) at Taronga Zoo

Commodity Advisor in Grain Marketing

Architect

Homicide Detective

Publicist

Carbon Trader

Working in sales at Macquarie Bank

Account Executive in Digital Marketing

Graduate Nurse

IT Business Advisor

 

Have you tried myfuture?

Myfuture is a fantastic government resource for exploring careers.

I always recommend students create an account so they can explore the different tiles of the site.

There’s a great career profile tool, industry and occupation information, videos, study pathways, and great articles.

Parents can also sign up for accounts to get access to information that might help them to assist others (and to do some of the activities themselves!).

 

 

Science Snippets

I’ve been noticing a lot of butterflies around recently. It could be because the weather is perfect for them or maybe it’s because I consistently …

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Science Snippets

I’ve been noticing a lot of butterflies around recently. It could be because the weather is perfect for them or maybe it’s because I consistently try and look for them but whenever I see one or any insect for that matter, it always brings my mind back to the impending doom of the ‘The insect apocalypse’.

So, what is the ‘insect apocalypse’? The insect apocalypse is the informal name that entomologists and scientist have given to the sudden decrease in insect populations.  When thinking of an apocalyptic landscape I think of a barren wasteland of dirt and dust, while this is very extreme – it might not be far from the potential result of this so called ‘insect apocalypse’.

Among terrestrial vertebrates, 322 species have become extinct since 1500, and populations of the remaining species show 25% average decline in abundance. With invertebrates, their patterns are equally dire with 67% of monitored populations showing a 45% mean abundance decline.

A study conducted in Germany (covering 63 nature protection areas) estimates a seasonal decline of 76%, and a mid-summer decline of 82% in flying insect biomass over the 27-year study. What is the actual significance of these numbers? Although many people despise insects for their creepy eyes, twiggy legs and the fact that they’re a pest, they serve an important role in our ecosystem. They are a source of pollination for plants, they aerate soil and encourage plant growth, they feast on decomposing plants and animals, thereby getting rid of waste and recycling nutrients back into their habitat and they are also a source of food for many other organisms such as frogs, birds and possums. Their decline threatens the numbers of many other animals. For example, the mountain pygmy possum. This possum is a native Australian marsupial and its primary food source (the Australian bogong moth) is being threatened by climate change and drought, causing pygmy possums to go hungry. These impacts reverberate up the food chain and will affect animals who feed off of insects, invertebrates, insectivores and even further to animals whom feed off particular insect pollinated plants.

Not only will animals feel these consequences but so will us humans and our ecosystem. In places like China, the decrease in bee and pollinator populations have forced farmers and agricultural workers into manually pollinating their crops due to the uncertainty that leaving the duty of pollination to a struggling population will allow for a consistent yield. But there are simple solutions; studies in Europe and North America have found that planting strips of wildflowers on farms, and leaving patches of natural vegetation such as forests, can greatly boost pollinator populations. These practices can also increase populations of natural predators, decreasing the need for pesticide sprays.

To summarise, the loss of insects is bad. There are things that need to be done to work toward something better, but those things can’t be done without awareness and responsibility.

Inserted below is a list of butterfly host plants, planting these in your garden can help boost certain butterfly populations and can attract more beneficial butterflies to your yard!

20 BUTTERFLY SPECIES WITH HOST PLANTS:

  1. Orchard Swallowtail (Papilio aegeus) – Citrus species
  2. Fuscous Swallowtail (Papiliofuscus) – Citrus species
  3. Dainty Swallowtail (Papilio anactus) – Citrus species
  4. Chequered Swallowtail (Papilio demoleus) – Cullen tenax
  5. Clearwing Swallowtail (Cressida cressida) – Aristolochia species
  6. Blue Triangle (Graphium choredon) – Cryptocarya species, Camphor Laurel
  7. Pale Triangle (Graphium eurypylus) – Melodorum leichhardtii
  8. Common Crow (Euploea corrinna) – Parsonsia species
  9. Purple Crow (Euploea tulliolus) – Trophis scandens
  10. Blue Tiger (Tirumala hamata) – Secamone elliptica
  11. Wanderer/Monarch (Danaus plexippus) —Asclepias, Gomphocarpus
  12. Lesser Wanderer (Danaus chrysippus petilia) —Asclepias, Gomphocarpus
  13. Lemon Migrant (Catopsilia pomona) – Cassia brewsteri
  14. Yellow Migrant (Catopsilia gorgophone) – Senna gaudichaudii
  15. White Migrant (Catopsilia pyranthe) – Senna barclayana
  16. Grass Yellow (Eurema hecabe) – Breynia oblongifolia, Sesbania cannabina
  17. Caper White (Belenoisjava) – Capparis species
  18. Jezebel Nymph (Mynes geoffroyi) – Pipturus argenteus
  19. Meadow Argus (Junonia villida) – Verbenas
  20. Blue Argus (Junonia orithya) – Asystasia gangetica, Hygrophila

Courtesy of Dave St Henry for publication by the Butterfly and Other Invertebrates Club Inc. (BOIC)

Emma Barry (UQ Science Ambassador)

Resources consulted:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/feb/25/decline-in-bogong-moth-numbers-leaves-pygmy-mountain-possums-starving

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/05/where-have-all-insects-gone

https://science.sciencemag.org/content/345/6195/401

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0185809

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0142992#sec002

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2019/02/why-insect-populations-are-plummeting-and-why-it-matters/

https://www.ck12.org/biology/importance-of-insects/lesson/Importance-of-Insects-MS-LS/

https://www.chinadialogue.net/article/show/single/en/5193-Decline-of-bees-forces-China-s-apple-farmers-to-pollinate-by-hand

http://www.boic.org.au/

 

Upcoming events:

Please note that the Brisbane World Science Festival (https://www.worldsciencefestival.com.au/) has been cancelled.

Future Experiences in Agriculture, Science and Technology (FEAST) is a four-day residential program to inspire high school students about rewarding science careers in the agriculture, animal, plant and food industries. It is open to students in years 11 and 12 and is held each July at UQ Gatton.

By participating in FEAST you’ll get to:

  • test-drive university and meet other students with similar interests
  • explore science disciplines through hands-on activities and workshops
  • meet UQ students and staff and attend industry-run sessions
  • experience living in the UQ Halls of Residence and take part in social and sporting activities
  • expand your knowledge of UQ Science study options and programs
  • learn about current challenges faced by scientists, including climate change, biosecurity, feeding the world and protecting endangered wildlife.

Numbers are limited, and due to high demand, you can only attend FEAST once. Applications for FEAST 2020 close Monday 30 March 2020. Head to: https://science.uq.edu.au/event/feast

Regards,

Wendy Macdonald (Leader of Learning – Science)

Lions Youth of the Year zone champion

Congratulations to Imogen Fraser, Year 12 on winning the zone final of Lions Youth of the Year. Imogen will progress to the regional competition of …

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Lions Youth of the Year zone champion

Congratulations to Imogen Fraser, Year 12 on winning the zone final of Lions Youth of the Year. Imogen will progress to the regional competition of this prestigious event in two weeks time.

Imogen inspired the audience with her passionate prepared speech about female leadership and addressed two impromptu topics without preparation for two minutes each with class and composure.

Notice to parents who use Ongoing Purchase Authority forms in the School Shop

From Term 2, Stuartholme will not be using the Ongoing Purchase Authority forms currently being used by some parents in the School Shop. Since the …

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Notice to parents who use Ongoing Purchase Authority forms in the School Shop

From Term 2, Stuartholme will not be using the Ongoing Purchase Authority forms currently being used by some parents in the School Shop.

Since the introduction of Flexischools, students can use their school ID card, or a debit/credit card to make purchases at the School Shop.

The benefit for parents include:

  • Parents will be able to receive itemised receipts. At the moment, when transactions using the form are processed, parents will only see the charge in their credit card.
  • The transaction will be charged to the customer account immediately.
  • If paying with Flexischools, our staff can double check the students with their photo and parents are able to see their transaction history for future purposes.

 

Centenary book and merchandise

To commemorate our centenary in 2020 Stuartholme invites you to purchase our  ‘Celebrating 100 years’ book. This beautiful, limited edition, hardcover book follows the history …

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Centenary book and merchandise

To commemorate our centenary in 2020 Stuartholme invites you to purchase our  ‘Celebrating 100 years’ book.

This beautiful, limited edition, hardcover book follows the history of Stuartholme from humble beginnings, through to the school we know and love today.

Books can still be purchased for the early bird price of $69.95 (plus postage if needed).

Click here to purchase. Orders will be shipped in May, 2020.

100 Year Merchandise

To celebrate our centenary we have commissioned a small range of memorabilia available for sale. The items are now available for sale at the School Shop.

Centenary fine chain necklace – $41.60
Solid silver bracelet – $53
Centennial pin – $4
Stuartholme tea towels – $5 each or 3 for $10.