In this issue

Message from the new Director of Enrichment
Update your daughter’s medical details
Parents of Stuartholme update
Short term boarding options
Science Snippets
French trip information session
Music at Twilight
Save the date! Rowing celebrates 25 years
Invitation – Brisbane Archdiocesan P&F

Message from the Principal

Dear Parents, Caregivers and Friends, As a faith community, we launched our Lenten season in our Ash Wednesday Mass this week. Lent is a time of remembering Jesus’ time in the desert. When he entered a time of self-reflection as he decided on a new direction of his life.  Jesus …

From the Principal
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Message from the Principal

Dear Parents, Caregivers and Friends,

As a faith community, we launched our Lenten season in our Ash Wednesday Mass this week.

Lent is a time of remembering Jesus’ time in the desert. When he entered a time of self-reflection as he decided on a new direction of his life.  Jesus was deciding should he continue with the status quo of his life or should he devote his life to challenging the norms he found to be unjust in his world. During these 40 days, he wrestled with his conscience and his inner demons; he struggled with his own self-belief. Jesus emerged from his 40 days of self-reflection and harsh self-discipline to change his world and consequently, the world over the past 2000 years. Jesus taught the world that everyone, no matter their race or religion deserves to be treated with dignity and respect.

In Lent we mimic Jesus’ self-reflection and self-discipline:

  • Prayer or self-reflection – what are we grateful for and how can we be more in our relationships
  • Fasting or self-discipline – in what way will we regulate ourselves to stop doing something negative and improve ourselves and our relationships
  • Almsgiving or giving to others – what is most precious to us – our time and our relationships – how will we give more?

Our Sacred Heart theme this year is: Compassion, Connection and Change. Let us consider how to use our 2019 focus goal and theme to our Lenten pledges.

Compassion – what are we going to do less of or more of to improve your capacity for Compassion?

Connection – whatever you decide to do, the outcome should improve your relationships with others.

Change – don’t change things for the sake of just changing something, ensure it improves who you are.

Our greatest strength of our Stuartholme School is our strong sense of belonging and community. We build our community on the teachings of Jesus, on love and compassion. We all have a role to play in ensuring people are loved and safe within both our Church and in our School community. We can never remain silent about the abuse of any human; consequently, it is important to acknowledge the confronting news within our Church in the past few weeks and the revelations of the Royal Commission late last year. I hope and pray every member of our community can offer their support and compassion to those who are victims and hurting.

I believe the work of the Royal Commission will ensure systems lead to cultural change in the Church that will have a lasting impact in improving the safety of children. As a member of the Royal Commission Task Force, I believe in the positive and proactive steps they are taking to implement the recommendations of the Commission. Student protection is the highest importance at Stuartholme; we work constantly to improve our working knowledge and practices to ensure the safety of all our students. While Lent challenges us individually to reflect and renew ourselves, it is also a time for the Church to reflect on and implement significant positive and proactive change.

Take care and God Bless,

Kristen Sharpe
Principal

 

 

Key Dates

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Key Dates

DateEvent
Fri 22 MarchMusic at Twilight 6-8.30pm
Mon 25 - Fri 29 MarchYear 12 Assessment Block
Mon 25 MarchYear 10 Careers Testing
Mon 1 - Tues 2 AprilYear 12 QCS Practice Test
Mon 1 AprilYear 7 Immunisations
Wed 3 AprilYear 10 Retreat
Fri 5 AprilYears 10-12 Parent Daughter Breakfast 7am
Classes finish at 12pm
Boarders travel day
Tues 23 AprilBoarders return
Boarder Parent Network Meeting 10-11.30am
Parents of Stuartholme Meeting 7pm
Parent Teacher interviews 10am-8pm
Wed 24 AprilStudents start
School fees due
Wed 25 AprilANZAC Day public holiday
Tues 30 April Interhouse Cross Country

Message from the Deputy Principal

Whilst many students don’t like assessment, it is an important part of the teaching and learning process as it provides opportunities for teachers to gather …

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Message from the Deputy Principal

Whilst many students don’t like assessment, it is an important part of the teaching and learning process as it provides opportunities for teachers to gather evidence about students’ progress and what they need to do next to improve. The feedback provided as a result of assessment can be one of the most powerful influences on learning and achievement. Some of the most significant research on feedback comes from Hattie and Timperley (2007) who showed that effective feedback can almost double the average student growth over a school year. Dylan Wiliam’s work (2010) supported that student learning is accelerated by at least 50%, or an additional six months or more over a year.

Unfortunately, the type of feedback and the way it is given can be differentially effective. This means that schools have a responsibility to ensure teachers know how to give the type of feedback that raises achievement. At Stuartholme, we have implemented a whole school approach to feedback. In our Professional Learning Communities this semester, teachers are discussing what makes feedback effective. We are working on structures underpinned by Hattie and Timperley and Wiliam and Black’s work and supported by the Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership. AITSL has produced a 3-minute video that provides a summary of effective feedback and these models. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LjCzbSLyIwI

Effective feedback should identify and help continuously drive a student’s understanding or performance towards a learning goal. It must answer one or more of the following questions for the student:

  • Where am I going? (what are the goals?)
  • How am I going? (what progress is being made towards the goals?)
  • Where to next? (what activities need to be undertaken to make better progress?)

Being able to answer these questions helps students to become assessment-capable learners who can accurately self-reflect against the criteria, plan their next learning steps, and monitor their progress. This in turns helps to build their own capacity and highlights the important role they play in their own learning. Feedback around self-regulation is particularly powerful. Hattie and Timperley (2007) state that ‘less effective learners have minimal self-regulation strategies, and they depend more on external factors (such as teacher or the task) for feedback. However, if students are willing to perform self-assessment, to look at their learning skills, they will become effective learners. Black and Wiliam (2009) agree that students need to be activated as the owners of their own learning.

As we continue to develop our capacity to provide effective feedback, some of the measurable we are hoping to see include:

  • increased student effort
  • student use of more effective strategies
  • improved student autonomy, self-assessment and self-management
  • teacher provision of more appropriate and specific goals
  • teacher adaptation of teaching strategies to meet students’ needs.

To further support students to become assessment capable, and ensure that parents/carers have access to the feedback so that they can support their daughters, Stuartholme School has made a number of changes to our reporting processes in 2019 as outlined below.

Reporting Changes 2019

Throughout the year, students and parents/carers will receive reporting feedback in two forms:

  • Feedback on individual assessment tasks
  • An end of semester summary report.

1.      Feedback on individual assessment tasks

Teachers will provide feedback on each assessment task based on the following guidelines:

  • a written comment
  • a grade on a 15-point scale (A+ to E-) (Years 7-10, Year 12 and Year 11 Applied subjects) or a numerical mark (Year 11)
  • a task-specific rubric based on the QCAA’s standard elaborations (Years 7 to 10)
  • feedback on the student’s effort and organisation for class (Years 7 to 10).

Comments will appear on My Stuartholme within 10 working days of submission of the assignment or completion of the task.  If longer time than this is required, parents will be notified via email.

Teachers will write 3-5 comments based on:

  1. how well the student has understood or performed the task.
  2. how well the student understood the main processes required to perform the task.
  3. the student’s management of their learning – planning and self-monitoring.

Comments will focus on what the student has done well and the steps required for improvement.

Student feedback can be viewed by clicking the ‘Results’ button on My Stuartholme. Parents will receive an email when results have been published by teachers and a mobile phone notification if the Stuartholme School App has been downloaded. The Years 7-10 task-specific rubric can be accessed by clicking the ‘View more feedback’ button under ‘Results’. Please use a laptop or desktop computer when accessing this function as it is not compatible with mobile devices.

If parents have concerns about the feedback or results, the classroom teacher is the first point of contact.

As students and parents will now receive continuous feedback on individual assessment items, there will no longer be an interim report issued at the end of Term 1.

 2.      An end of semester summary report

Each semester a summary transcript will be released via My Stuartholme that provides both a pastoral and academic snapshot of the semester.

Teacher Mentors will provide a comment based on a range of areas including wellbeing, engagement across the School and co-curricular participation throughout the semester.  In addition, information will be provided on the number of days absent and the number of late arrivals and early departures.

The Academic Transcript will provide a summary of the semester’s learning including:

  • the student’s achievement to that point in time in each subject (Years 7-10 and Year 12 will be reported as A+ to E-) (Year 11 will be reported as A-E)
  • a graph reflecting the student’s position in the cohort.
  • a grade reflecting the student’s attitude to learning.

There are no comments provided on the student’s learning across the semester as all written feedback will have been provided at the time of assessment feedback.

Should you have any questions about the feedback model or our reporting changes, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Deanne Johnston
Deputy Principal

 

Reference list

AITSL (2018) Spotlight: Reframing feedback to improve teaching and learning, https://www.aitsl.edu.au/docs/default-source/research-evidence/spotlight/spotlight-feedback.pdf?sfvrsn=cb2eec3c_12

Black, P., & Wiliam, D. (2010). Inside the black box: Raising standards through classroom assessment. Phi Delta Kappan, 92(1), 81-90. 

Hattie, John and Timperley, Helen (2007) “The Power of Feedback”, Review of Educational Research March 2007, Vol. 77, No. 1, pp. 81-112 DOI: 10.3102/003465430298487

Wiliam, Dylan (2016) “The secret of effective feedback” Educational Leadership, April 2016, Vol. 73, No. 7, pp. 10-15.

 

 

 

 

 

Message from the Dean of Mission

This week we celebrate two significant events; Ash Wednesday Mass and International Women’s Day. We had a beautiful mass on Wednesday led by Fr Frank …

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Message from the Dean of Mission

This week we celebrate two significant events; Ash Wednesday Mass and International Women’s Day. We had a beautiful mass on Wednesday led by Fr Frank O’Dea that recognised the beginning of our Lenten journey of reflection, self-discipline and giving to others. During the mass we also launched our annual Caritas fundraiser, Project Compassion. Project Compassion is Caritas Australia’s annual fundraising and awareness-raising appeal that brings thousands of Australians together in solidarity with the world’s poor to help end poverty, promote justice and uphold dignity. The theme for Project Compassion 2019 is based around giving Lent 100% in the name of hope and showcases the many ways Caritas Australia works with local partners to offer hope to people most vulnerable to extreme poverty and injustice. Stuartholme kicked off our Project Compassion fundraising on Tuesday with our annual Shrove Tuesday Pancake Sale run by our amazing Liturgy Committee.

The captain of our Liturgy Committee, Catherine Ostwald, also provided a wonderful reflection on the readings during our Ash Wednesday Mass. When the priest who has provided many an Ash Wednesday homily comments on its eloquence and message, you know it’s a good one! We congratulate Cate and have included it for you below.

 In the seventh century, Lent involved Catholics having to abstain from all animal products for 40 days. On top of having to be vegan for 40 days, they were made to fast for the duration of Lent, which involved eating only one meal a day and drinking a little water throughout the day, and this was in an era when there were no such thing as cute vegan cafes like Charlie’s Raw Squeeze. Fast forward to the early 20th century, and things got a bit more lenient. On Sundays you were not made to fast and now people were permitted to eat animal products throughout the 40 days. However, meat was not permitted on Wednesdays, Fridays, Ember Saturday or Holy Saturday, and to consume meat on these days you had to request a dispensation from the Catholic Diocese. We now land in today, the early 21st century where true fasting is seen as putting away all evil, to control the tongue, to forbear from anger and abstain for slander, falsehood and perjury. Essentially, Lent is no longer about what we’re eating, but it’s about what we’re doing and what we’re saying, and how we’re living out our role as children of God. 

Over the span of 14 centuries, Lent has definitely changed. Fasting has gone from Veganism for 40 days to maybe giving up social media, or chocolate or soft drink. But when we break it down, what does Lent really mean, not in terms of actions, but what does it mean within us?

In its simplest form, Lent is a time period for us to replicate Jesus’ sacrifice and withdrawal when he ventured into the desert for 40 days and was tempted by Satan on multiple occasions, each time refusing. We heard in the First Reading: “Return to me with your whole heart, with fasting, and weeping, and mourning”. Then the Gospel read to us: “When you give Alms, your almsgiving must be secret” and “When you pray, go to your private room, and when you have shut your door, pray to our God who is in that secret place”, and “When you fast, put oil on your head and wash your face, so that no one will know you are fasting except our God”. But when you take biblical passages from centuries ago it’s not hard to get lost in the true meaning. We hear the words Almsgiving, Fasting and Prayer, but much like Lent, our understanding of these words has changed.

In a moment you will receive some ashes on your forehead and you will hear the words “Turn away from sin and be faithful to the Gospel”, and Lent is just that. It is 40 days for us to be the best possible versions of ourselves. It is a time for us to reflect, to give of ourselves, and to sacrifice the stuff that is weighing us down, and no, I don’t mean what is quite literally weighing you down like chocolate.

Have you ever had those moments where you will be lying in your bedroom, and you’ll look around and think: “My room looks so daggy, I need to get all new paint, a new bed cover and more decorations”. Or you might have been trying to find an outfit, and you’ll all of the sudden decide that all of your clothes are hideous, and you need to go out and get a whole new wardrobe. But, have you ever had one of those moments where your mind is in deep transit, and you think, “Gosh, I just really don’t like the person I am or the person I’m becoming”. Lent is the time to fix that. It is 40 days for a personal renovation.

Maybe your Lenten promise is to stop buying Iced Coffees at the tuck-shop, and with the money you save you have decided that you are going to buy a pair of shoes that you have just been dying to get your hands on. Or is it to stop eating bread, or chocolate or cake in hope that you will shed a few extra kilograms before formal? Or maybe your Lenten promise is to stop watching Married at First Sight during the week and bank it until the weekend? All great Lenten promises, and I really wish I had enough will to commit to them, but the only person that benefits from them is you. By doing it, you are getting that self-revival, but are you really becoming a better person despite the fact that your shoes may be popping?

Almsgiving is not giving to yourself after surviving the Lenten struggle, but instead, it’s giving to someone who needs dinner on their plate more than you need new-season shoes on your feet.

Fasting is not cutting out a food group so that you can slay in your formal dress, but instead its making a sacrifice so that you can be brought closer to Jesus, replicating the ultimate sacrifice he made for us.

Prayer is not you deciding that you won’t watch MAFS all week so that you can go to bed earlier and have some ‘Me time’ with your Pinterest board. Prayer is about you taking some of your time to grow a develop a deeper connection with people around you, nurturing a united heart with those around you.

Instead of putting the money you have saved from Iced coffee into something for yourself, put it into a charity of your choice. Rather than giving up soft drink, how about giving up pessimism? Maybe instead of devoting time to your Pinterest board, maybe put some time into fostering the important relationships within your life.  

Although having nice shoes, or losing weight, or watching 4 episodes of Married at First Sight on the weekend may make you feel like a better person, Jesus did not go into the desert for 40 days to lose weight or see how long he could last without Wi-Fi, he went into the desert to “Turn away from sin and be faithful to the Gospel”.

Lent is not meant to be a time of punishment. No one is asking you to head out to the Simpson desert without Wi-Fi, uber eats, Air Pods or a Sephora within a 100km radius. Lent is about prayer, almsgiving and fasting, it’s about you becoming a better person. You’ve got 40 days, what will you do with it?

Today we also celebrate International Women’s Day. This day celebrates the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women around the world. We stand in solidarity with all women who continue to experience discrimination as a result of their gender and we commit to work towards a world where there is gender parity. The International Women’s Day 2019 campaign theme of #BalanceforBetter is a call-to-action for driving gender balance across the world.

At our assembly last week, our Cor Unum Captain Amelia Starky delivered our annual International Women’s Day address. She had some powerful messages in it encouraging our Stuartholme girls to defy the statistics, raise their hands and relish the gift of learning from and with other young women (see speech below). As we celebrate this day we acknowledge both the men and women in our community who support the growth of our exceptional young women.

Amelia Starky, Cor Unum Captain

I could easily lay out the facts for you.

Fewer women run top Australian companies than men named John — or Peter, or David.

An Australian male lawyer earns $619 more than his female counterpart in one week of full-time work.

And in the oh-so competitive arena of pocket-money earning, on average, boys receive $13 and girls, $9.60.

It’s estimated that if women’s unpaid work were assigned a monetary value, it would constitute between 10 per cent and 39 per cent of GDP, the total market value of all goods and services produced in one year.

And on current trends, gender parity in CEO roles will occur in 2221. 

 But, chances are you’ll probably hear all of that again. Once more, you’ll be told that your sex is not biologically inferior, but that it is economically. And socially. It’s important that we do hear it – To be reminded of our ability to live, to thrive, in the face of it – in the masked face of statistics so plain and so unintelligible lest they become your lived reality. No, I trust that you will again be called to remember the pervasiveness of gender inequality in all its statistical glory. But unlike those facts, there are some things in life you won’t ever experience again.

 This won’t happen again. A single-sex education. This life surrounded by girls surrounding you.

These girls sitting next to you won’t think exactly as you do, or feel the same way either. But they will live the way that you do. They live as daughters. They live as sisters. They live as women. As Stuartholme girls.

Living as a woman, is something that I feel I can claim reasonable aptitude for. I’ve only been doing it for not yet 17 years, but I think I could claim to have covered the basics. I also think that I could claim to have covered more – Because I have known what it is to learn in a room of girls. To debate the nature of ambition in Shakespeare’s Macbeth, as if I had a clue what Shakespeare was getting at. Most of all, I’ve known what it is to call out the answer to a teacher’s question. To answer despite knowing that I might get it wrong, being absolutely elated when I don’t. Because there’s always a chance you’ll get it wrong. And there’s always a chance you’ll get it right.

 But when you’re in a classroom of girls, and only girls, you know this chance and don’t submit to it. You do not bow down to the potential that you’ll make a mistake, because you’re not embarrassed to make one. You’re not embarrassed because the girl next to you isn’t either. In order to learn, you must make a mistake. And in order to make a mistake, you must raise your hand. To be afraid to make a mistake is to be afraid to learn. At Stuartholme, at an all-girls school, that fear is banished by the laughter, the tears and the voices; the raised hands of teenage girls.

 So raise your hand. In a boardroom 20 years from now, remember the chair in R207. And know that your boardroom chair, though potentially more comfortable, is no different to the classroom chair in which you raised your hand. A classroom chair belonging only to girls. Belonging to you. In its memory, raise your hand and defy the statistic that tells you that you don’t.

As I was researching for this speech – typing, clicking and scrolling through the millions and millions of things people have to say about women and the word that carries so many connotations – feminism – I happened upon an article that… well spurred my interest. It was titled International Women’s Day: Five reasons life is hard for women. And I thought “only five?” I could think of 10 faster than I could say this very sentence. For in all honesty, sometimes the discourse surrounding women and the injustices they suffer at the hands of a patriarchy given birth to by men is, to me at least, disheartening. The facts are disheartening. – but the truth is not. Because the truth is that, for all the hardships, all the numerical data that can be used to define womanhood, that definition will always compromise its indescribable reality. An indescribable reality hardly able to be captured in a speech, let alone a statistic.

 Our pain, our joy, our words and our stories say more about us than statistics ever will.

Womanhood is not a percentage, a fraction or a likelihood.

The time spent with other women. The time spent talking with each other, learning from one another – unashamed of making a mistake, and unashamed of being a teenage girl. The time here at Stuartholme. That is womanhood. And though womanhood is so very multi-faceted, I think this side of it – the side where girls grow with girls, until they become so much more than just a girl, is one of the best.

Because here at Stuartholme, you never stand alone.

You have the face of one girl. But you have the love of 675 others.

As Lady Gaga would repeatedly say, “There can be a hundred people in the room, and 99 don’t believe in you, and all it takes is one”.

 So, in light of that one girl, let us not be defined by numbers. By bar graphs and pie charts. Who we are cannot be read. It cannot be analysed. It cannot be calculated. It can only be felt.

 Don’t be a number. Be a woman. 

Sarah Daff
Dean of Mission

 

Message from the Dean of Boarding

Dear Parents/Guardians, Today we celebrate International Women’s Day with the theme of #BalanceforBetter. This year is looking to celebrate women’s achievements, to forge a more …

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Message from the Dean of Boarding

Dear Parents/Guardians,

Today we celebrate International Women’s Day with the theme of #BalanceforBetter. This year is looking to celebrate women’s achievements, to forge a more gender balanced world, to have a positive visibility of women and to recognise that we each have a part to play in influencing the beliefs and actions of others.

Our Monday night formal dinner enabled us in the Boarding House to look at the theme and share around our tables how we each can be agents of change. One of the YouTube clips shared, showed us who the inventors were of some amazing items, like windscreen wipers created by Mary Anderson in 1903, coffee filter bags by Melitta Bentz in 1908 and in 1917 Ida Forbes invented the water heater. Everyday items created by working women trying to make their everyday lives just that little bit better. Our challenge to our girls was “So what are you going to do that will make our world a better place?” Year 12 girls gathered for a photo under the #BalanceforBetter banner to reinforce our commitment to do just that.

At our formal dinner we announce our ‘Boarder of the Week’ and our two most recent girls acknowledged are Betsy Duff of Year 10 and Madeleine Roache also of Year 10. Congratulations to these two wonderful young women.

This term we have begun our training of all girls in how to respond in an Evacuation emergency. Dynamiq, a global emergency management company, is working with the whole school to assist us in how we prepare and train staff and students in how to respond effectively in the event of an emergency. This year we have chosen to train all Year 12 to be Fire Wardens, and so that no matter who is present in the House at any time we will have enough people to assist the younger girls and themselves to evacuate the House safely. We have had our first drill, in a planned time and day, our next one this Term will be unannounced. These are very important to ensure that we have the right processes in place and that the girls develop a level of comfort in knowing what to do and how to do so should a real emergency unfold one day.

 Important Things to Note this Week:

  • All weekend leave must be in by 11 am on Thursdays. If we receive leave requests on Friday that have hosts designated we are not familiar with or that asks for groups of older girls to go out together to non-parent hosts, we are not going to approve this
  • If we are concerned that boarders have been invited to parties where there might be alcohol or inadequate parent supervision, we will contact you immediately to talk through our concerns. We will also contact you if we have not heard of the host your daughter has asked to go to. It is our prerogative to refuse any leave requests if we are concerned about risk. This is because our duty of care continues unless your daughter is in your care on the weekend
  • Boarders return on Tuesday 23rd April by 5 pm. This is also Parent Teacher Interview Day
  • End of term leave must be in via REACH on Friday 15 March by 5 pm
  • Once again, all leave must be submitted via REACH: contact Ms Ellen McLean on emclean@stuartholme.comif you cannot access REACH
  • You are always welcome to join us in celebrating Mass. Mass starts every Sunday at 5pm
  • Please note we will decline leave requests if they are for students to be out during Mass time; MASS IS A COMPULSORY PART OF BEING A STUARTHOLME BOARDER.

As we move forward into the pointy end of the term when assessments are due and girls can start to get a little stressed and ready to come home, let us remember that love, wellbeing and connection can help us respond to chaos with calm. Thanks to all parents and guardians for so often being the calm and supportive voices on the other end of the phone!

It is great working in partnership with you. Know that you can contact me via email at anytime or phone (if urgent).  Ms Melissa, Miss Ellen and Ms Catherine are your first point of contact for day to day issues regarding your daughter (mrobinson@stuartholme.comemclean@stuartholme.comcsagin@stuartholme.com)

Wishing you a wonderful fortnight ahead.

Blessing with you and your family,

Karen Davies

 

Message from the Dean of Student Wellbeing

Protecting our children in the real world and online I was delighted to attend the Parents of Stuartholme Meeting last week and to talk with …

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Message from the Dean of Student Wellbeing

Protecting our children in the real world and online

I was delighted to attend the Parents of Stuartholme Meeting last week and to talk with the many parents who attended about safety online.

I felt that we shared the desire to work together to protect our children and that this is just as important “online” as in the “real world”.

The top tips for protecting your daughter online

In talking to parents we discussed the top tips that experts such as the e-Safety Commissioner offer to support parents in this endeavour. I thought that these were worthwhile sharing with all of our parents:

  1. It is just as important to play the role of parent in the online world – so keep up to date with this world and who your daughter is connecting with.
  2. The internet is the most public place to be – help your daughter understand this before she posts or emails anything online.
  3. Keep internet linked devices out of the bedroom – this reduces the risks to your daughter by 50 per cent.

 

Putting the internet in context for our children

The Internet can make it hard for young people to put the real world in context.

A key role that we can play as parents and caregivers is to empower our girls to understand that the online world is merely an extension of the real world.

As such we must encourage our girls to exhibit the very same values online that we as a community would expect in the real world such as kindness, human dignity and respect.

When to get help?

It is important that our girls understand that cyberbullying is a criminal offence and against the law.

The office of the eSafety Commissioner ( www.esafety.gov.au) has been established by the Australian Government to help families with cyberbullying and provide support.

Reports of offensive or illegal content can be made anonymously. The Office can also work to get cyberbullying material removed from any communication service.

 

Lord Mayor’s Youth Advisory Council (LMYAC)

I would like to warmly congratulate Sophia Buller who will proudly represent Stuartholme on the LMYAC for 2019. This valuable forum will enable Sophia to discuss issues that are important to her directly with the Lord Mayor and Council officers. We wish Sophia all the very best in the important role she will play in shaping the future of our city 

Student Environmental Leadership Network (SELN)

In 2019, Stuartholme will be well represented in the Green Heart Schools’ Student Environmental Leadership Network (SELN) program by Mekenzie Hermann and Grace McIntosh. I am confident that these girls will make a valuable contribution in this unique learning and leadership program. Through their efforts, Mekenzie and Grace will directly engage their peers to take action to be cleaner, greener and more sustainable.

 

Deb Lonsdale-Walker
Dean of Student Wellbeing

 

 

 

 

Message from the Director of Enrichment

This year I have changed roles at Stuartholme moving from Junior Studies Director to the newly created position of Director of Enrichment. In this role …

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Message from the Director of Enrichment

This year I have changed roles at Stuartholme moving from Junior Studies Director to the newly created position of Director of Enrichment. In this role I am focussing on ensuring our high potential students are extended academically and that both curriculum and co-curricular enrichment opportunities are provided for all girls. I have been allocated a section of My Stuartholme  were I will provide information about programs and opportunities as they arise.

Currently the following opportunities are available:

The Griffith University Aviation Flight Camp is a three-day non-live-in camp for Year 11 and 12 students (Monday 8 April – Wednesday 10 April) providing a unique opportunity to experience what an aviation career has to offer. Students will take part in a range of hands-on activities, connect with student mentors, hear from a variety of industry speakers and enjoy opportunities for behind the scene tours of Qantas, Airbus and the Royal Flying Doctor Service.  https://my.stuartholme.com/news/1722 for more information and links to application forms.

The  1-Minute Film Competition is an initiative of Australian Teachers of Media (ATOM). It provides Australian and New Zealand primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to make a 60-second short film or animation, and win fantastic prizes in the process. The theme for this year’s competition is Loyalty. Last year we had two entries in the competition and we’d like to at least double that number in 2019. More information can be obtained at their website:   http://1-minutefilmcompetition.org /

World Scholar’s Cup is a fun international academic competition in which teams of three students complete a collaborative writing activity, a group debate and an academic quiz. Brisbane heats are being conducted at Anglican Church Grammar School (Churchie) on 8 and 9 April. I am seeking expression of interest from girls who are interested in this competition. More information can be found on their web site http://scholarscup.org/

Finally, congratulations to three of our Year 10 students (Sophie Buller, Jayde MaCarthy and Revelle Rolfe) who recently completed a one day Future Problem Solving Evaluators course at the University of Queensland. As well as gaining a much better insight into Future Problem Solving the girls are now able to act as evaluators in Future Problem Solving competitions. I’d like to thank our FPS co-ordinator Margie Luxford for organising this opportunity.

Michael Elliott
Director of Enrichment

Co-curricular News

CaSSSA Swimming Our swimmers have had a very successful day in the pool yesterday: 12years: 1st place 13years: 1st place 14years: 1st place 15years: 1st …

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Co-curricular News

CaSSSA Swimming

Our swimmers have had a very successful day in the pool yesterday:

12years: 1st place

13years: 1st place

14years: 1st place

15years: 1st place

16years: 1st place

17 years: 1st place

Open (100m/200m events): 1st Place

All Age Relay: 1st Place and new record (broke the 2018 Stuartholme held record)

Percentage Cup: 2nd Place

Overall: 1st Place – 2019 CaSSSA Cup Champions

Debating

Round 1 of Queensland Debating Union’s Secondary School competition is underway. Stuartholme have had a strong start to the season with many adjudicators commenting on our thorough understanding of the topic, well-structured speeches and the confidence our young women display during rebuttal. This feedback reiterates the importance of our foundation focus for debating in 2019. Congratulations to the teams who have had a successful first debate, in particular 10.2 who were negative against Brisbane Christian College, debating the topic ‘fast fashion should be banned.’ Not only did the team win, but by a margin of 5 points. Well done to Chloe Butler, Revelle Rolf and Mia Raymond!

Social Justice

In order to investigate and understand how social justice can become a part of our lifestyles, rather than a one off action, Stuartholme will be examining how we can be invested in social justice through three lenses:

  • Volunteering – Considered the traditional understanding of social justice, volunteering shouldn’t be disregarded. It helps motivate and provide grass root change by giving of time and skills. More importantly it reminds us that being present in the moment is vital in understanding how to respond appropriately.
  • Civic advocacy – We tell young people that they are the change makers, the next wave to balance the scales. Therefore, it is only fair that we help young people understand that their words have power. Civic advocacy is not about speaking for someone, but rather in support of someone. It is encouraging our young people to use their experience, education and position to support those who are marginalised and may not have the opportunity to have their voice heard.
  • Social enterprise – We understand social enterprise as commercial strategies to maximise the impact on environmental, social and economic wellness. It can be more than this. It is a way for young people to understand the ethical nature of industries, how they effectively choose what they buy, how they can change the market and that profit can be put to purpose.

To apply these lenses we need themes and Stuartholme have decided that this will be a student driven initiative. In honour of our RSCJ history, on Thursday 21st March we will host the First Stuartholme General Chapter. This afternoon will allow the student’s to reflect on the what issues are important to them, just as the RSCJ do in their General Chapters, and from there work though facilitated experiences run by our JPIC committee. This will result in our refined three themes for 2019.

We look forward to working with our community and handing the decision making process to our students who are more than ready and equipped to do so.

Claire Lawler, Social Justice Coordinator

Update your daughter’s medical and contact details

 

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Update your daughter’s medical and contact details

 

Parents of Stuartholme update

Last Tuesday evening, 26 February, the first Parents of Stuartholme (PoS) meeting for 2019 was held.  A PoS Committee was formed across Parent Coordinators, Year …

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Parents of Stuartholme update

Last Tuesday evening, 26 February, the first Parents of Stuartholme (PoS) meeting for 2019 was held.  A PoS Committee was formed across Parent Coordinators, Year Level Parent Reps and Co-Curricular Parent Support Group Reps.  Kudos to those parents who nominated for roles with their willingness and energy to help build our parent community. It looks to be an inclusive group with initiative and passion for Stuartholme families.

Notable thanks should also be given to the number of staff who attended the meeting with interest.  It is heart-warming to witness how invested Stuartholme staff are in our daughters.

The PoS strives to build an inclusive, welcoming parent community. It is not only the girls that suffer from “growing pains” during high school.  Navigating “parenthood” is a minefield for the majority of us and sharing the trials and tribulations of raising teenage girls is reassuring to realise you are not alone.  The PoS believe parents feel more engaged when they know information is available to them at all times.  All parents are encouraged to check out My Stuartholme and embrace the information provided there. Aside from school notices, class schedules and access to the newsletters, all noteworthy parent community info can be found under the “Parents of Stuartholme” tile in My Stuartholme.  Documents that are uploaded can be found on the right hand margin.  If you are unfamiliar with this area of the portal, please have a look, click a few documents and understand what is there and available.

Please note a 2019 PoS Contact List and a “How to get involved” form can be found on the PoS tile for your easy reference.

After each PoS Meeting, the Principal’s Report and any supporting documents will also be posted at the PoS tile on My Stuartholme which can be a great resource.

It is through My Stuartholme, closed Facebook pages and the Group Chats that all parents can engage with other parents across your year level and child’s extra-curricular activities.  It is through these groups and information sharing that will further build our parent community and bring us together!

Should you have any questions, concerns and/or would like to raise any issues to be discussed at the next PoS Meeting (or beforehand), do not hesitate to contact pos@stuartholme.com or the appropriate Parent Rep listed on the 2019 PoS Contact List, attached or on the portal under Parents of Stuartholme.

It is the hope of the 2019 PoS  to create a compassionate parent community who feel connected to both their daughters and Stuartholme School.  This can only truly happen by working in collaboration directly with the school and you as parents. Please help build a community where we can “be the best parents we can be”.

Barbara Green-Roads
Parent Liaison – 2019 Parents of Stuartholme

Short term boarding options

Did you know Stuartholme offers a number of boarding options? The Boarding House is open to our day families too. Short-term boarding is available during …

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Short term boarding options

Did you know Stuartholme offers a number of boarding options?

The Boarding House is open to our day families too. Short-term boarding is available during term time to help with co-curricular sports or for parents who need to travel.

For more information about our boarding options, including the terms and conditions, please contact Enrolments via email or telephone 3510 6419.

Science Snippets

A recent article in the Astrophysics Journal has revealed the light sequences from black holes seem to move backwards in time. When two neutron stars …

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Science Snippets

A recent article in the Astrophysics Journal has revealed the light sequences from black holes seem to move backwards in time.

When two neutron stars (very small celestial objects packed with neutrons) collide, a black hole is formed. Marking this formation, pulses of energy in the form of light are released. These are called Gamma Ray bursts (depicted on the left) and have been found to follow a unique and complicated sequence of light, which is then mirrored.

Scientists have no idea what causes this reversed feature, but as so little about black holes (depicted on the right) are known, they have agreed no theory should be disregarded.

The three main theories are:

  1. that the beams hit a reflective surface
  2. that the physics of black holes work differently, attracting the light back into the black hole
  3. or that time is actually being reversed.

Though the final theory seems unlikely, it is already widely accepted that black holes completely warp time and space. For objects approaching black holes, time slows down until they appear to completely stop, but for objects in a black hole time speeds up significantly. NASA defines a black hole as “a gigantic amount of matter packed into a tiny area, creating a gravitational field so immensely strong, that nothing, not even light, or perhaps not even time, can escape”.

Whether these incredible bursts are the result of a mirror, inconceivable physics, or time reversal, black holes allow us to question what we known about time, and according to some sources, entertain the idea that time could be manipulated.

To watch a video on the basics of black holes click here.

Sources: https://www.livescience.com/63415-time-reversed-structures-gamma-ray-bursts.html

https://www.techquila.co.in/gamma-ray-bursts-from-black-holes-reverse-time/

 

On the topic of extraterrestrial discovery, the theme for National Science Week this year is Destination moon: more missions, more science. This year’s science week activities at Stuartholme will focus on outer space, past missions, current space programs, as well as the future of space travel.

This is a big year for science, as we celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Periodic Table. This year the scientific community anticipates the first photos of black holes, the first samples from the moon, more Antarctic research projects, and much more.

If you want to get involved in science this year, there are many options. This month UQ is sponsoring many events, such as:

  • The UQ/QAMT Problem Solving competition, which is a 2-hour competition held at UQ’s St Lucia campus on the 16th of March. This test is widely recognised by universities, and is an awesome experience for anyone hoping to pursue a career in mathematics or engineering, or anyone wanting to get some cash. 1st place wins $100, 2nd place wins $50, and 3rd place wins $30. The entry fee is $5, and for more information visit http://www.maths.uq.edu.au/qamt/
  • The Australian Brain Bee challenge, an incredible neuroscience competition for students in year 10. This is excellent for anyone hoping to pursue neuroscience, or anyone with an interest in the brain, as this program is nationally recognised. Participants attend numerous workshops in which they learn about the brain, its functions, neurological technology, and neurology careers. It takes place from the 12th-18th of March, for more information visit https://qbi.uq.edu.au/get-involved/australian-brain-bee-challenge
  • The World Science Festival, which takes place from March 21-25. This is a massive science fair filled with workshops, demonstrations, and shows on an extensive range of scientific topics, aiming to make science more accessible. This is a great event to attend with family or friends. http://www.worldsciencefestival.com.au/about/world-science-festival/

If you have any questions regarding the science opportunities, please get in touch with Ms Macdonald (wmacdonald@stuartholme.com).

Kind regards,

Maia Craig (UQ Science Ambassador)

French Trip Information Session

We are planning a trip to France and Belgium in December 2019 for French students in Years 9, 10 and 11.  We will spend some …

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French Trip Information Session

We are planning a trip to France and Belgium in December 2019 for French students in Years 9, 10 and 11.  We will spend some time in Paris and Belgium and then stay with families from La Croix Blanche, our sister school near Lille. There will be a Parent Information Session at 7pm on Wednesday 20 March in R104 for anyone interested in finding out more.

Madame MacGregor

Save the date! – Music at Twilight

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Save the date! – Music at Twilight

Save the date! Rowing celebrates 25 years

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Save the date! Rowing celebrates 25 years

Invitation – Brisbane Archdiocesan P&F

PARENT EVENING & AGM 2019 ‘How to Stay Connected to Your Children, School & Church’ AN INVITATION TO ALL CATHOLIC SCHOOL PARENTS IN THE BRISBANE ARCHDIOCESE …

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Invitation – Brisbane Archdiocesan P&F

PARENT EVENING & AGM 2019

‘How to Stay Connected to Your Children, School & Church’

AN INVITATION TO ALL CATHOLIC SCHOOL PARENTS IN THE BRISBANE ARCHDIOCESE TO ATTEND A PARENT EVENING

THIS IS A FREE EVENT

ON THURSDAY 28 MARCH  6 PM – 8.30 PM

AT ST MARTIN’S CATHOLIC PRIMARY SCHOOL, CARINA

6-7 PM – LIGHT DINNER, BEER & WINE, TEA, COFFEE & DESSERT

  • PM GUEST SPEAKER – Br. Damien Price

7.45 PM – A CONVERSATION ABOUT PARENT ENGAGEMENT Carmel Nash OAM

P&F COUNCIL AGM

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS EVENT  AND TO REGISTER CLICK HERE: http://www.cvent.com/d/k6q8h1

Catholic School Parents

EMAIL: info@pandf.org.au  QueenslandWEB: www.cspq.catholic.edu.au

PH: 07 3336 9242