Message from the Principal

Dear Parents, Caregivers and Friends,

As we conclude Term 3 2018, we have much for which to be grateful. Our final weeks have been full and diverse – ranging from Social Justice to Strategic Planning to expression through the Arts and spiritual development.

On Saturday 15 September, Stuartholme School participated in a wave of social justice activities across the world. All Sacred Heart Schools, over 140 schools, across over 40 countries conducted activities which make a difference in their context. The wave started in New Zealand and rolled through Australia and Asia, then through Europe and Africa and finally onto North America, Canada and South America. Our Sony campers joined our camp leaders for fun activities and some orientation of our Stuartholme campus, easing them into our Sony Camp which is being held the first weekend of the September school holidays. This Term my experience of our internationality has been strongly emphasised through the Frontiers Conference in St Louis, Missouri, our ASIANZ Conference in Sydney and our Global Day of Service.

On Saturday 8 September, The Stuartholme School Board met for a Strategic Planning Day. Prior to our day, we compiled an enormous amount of data and information to be considered in the future directions of Stuartholme. The Board considered: their role in religious leadership of the school; the enrolment forecasts; the Gonski impacts and the reviewed Masterplan and the order of priorities of future projects. It was a very successful day. I am confident in our future plans. I will share some of these at our Parents of Stuartholme (PoS) Meeting on Day 1 of Term 4 2018.

Our Year 8s shone in the limelight at our Year 8 Arts Fiesta on Tuesday evening. Our Arts staff worked collectively, enabling our girls to express themselves through their studies of the Arts. A genuine congratulations to both students and staff for a wonderful rich artistic experience.

Ms Lonsdale-Walker, Sr Rita and I visited the Year 12 Retreat in Mapleton this week. After our Year 12 girls were strong and unified for their QCS test, it was a privilege to see them at ease, engaged and enjoying some reflection time in a more relaxed setting. Year 12 Retreat is a significant rite of passage of a Stuartholme girl. The program affirms the girl’s values and self-belief upon which she will build her own personal integrity as she moves into the world beyond secondary education. Each pending graduate is encouraged to reflect upon their strengths, their resilience and their capacity to contribute positively to their world. Our Year 12 Retreat is designed and facilitated by our talented Ms Sarah Daff. I thank all of our staff who contributed to the success of this Retreat.

I wish you a lovely break from school routines. I hope and pray all will enjoy some relaxation and rest, as Term 4 is short and saturated with so much to achieve.

Take care and God bless,

Kristen Sharpe

 

 

Key Dates

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Key Dates

DateEvent
Tues 18-Fri 21 SeptemberJunior Art Display
Thurs 20 SeptemberClasses finish
Fri 21 SeptemberBoarders travel day
Sat 22-Mon 24 SeptemberSony Camp
Mon 8 OctoberBoarders return
Boarder Parent Network meeting 10-11.30am
Parent Community Groups Principal Meeting 11.30am-12.30pm
Parents of Stuartholme (PoS) Meeting 6-7.30pm R106/107
Tues 9 OctoberYears 7-11 School fees due
Students start Term 4
Tues 16 OctoberYear 7 immunisations
Fri 19-Fri 26 OctoberMajor Art Exhibition
Opening night, 19 October.
Mon 22 OctoberStudent free day
Year 11 Semi-formal
Fri 26 OctoberSpring Spectacular 6pm
Mon 29 OctoberCelebration of Excellence 7pm
Fri 2 NovemberYear 12 Parent Daughter Breakfast 7am
Sun 4 NovemberMusic Breakfast 9am
Mon 5-Fri 9 NovemberYear 12 assessment block
Wed 14 NovemberYear 12 Boarders Farewell Liturgy and dinner
Thurs 15 NovemberYear 12 Valedictory Mass and Cocktail Party
Fri 16 NovemberYear 12 final day
Tues 20-Mon 26 NovemberYear 11 assessment block
Tues 27- Wed 28 November Year 11 QCS Practice Test
Thurs 29 NovemberCommunity Celebrations of St Philippine Duchesne with Carols, 5pm
Fri 30 November Boarders travel day
Christmas Liturgy and Final Assembly
Classes finish 12pm
Year 12 final fee statement issued
Wed 5 DecemberFinal day to return all library books and textbook hire
Fri 14 December2019 School fees (with discount) due

Message from the Deputy Principal

There is much international research to promote parental engagement in learning. This is very different from involvement in schooling. Whilst participation in school-based activities has …

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Message from the Deputy Principal

There is much international research to promote parental engagement in learning. This is very different from involvement in schooling. Whilst participation in school-based activities has many important benefits, especially in facilitating relationships, research suggests that how parents support children’s learning at home has a bigger impact on academic outcomes (Desforges and Abouchaar 2003).  If done well, parent engagement could add the equivalent of 2 or 3 extra years schooling for a child (Hattie, 2008).

Parental engagement is most effective when it is focused on developing positive attitudes towards learning and education for children, building their motivation and confidence as learners and fostering their enjoyment of learning. According to the report, Parental engagement in learning and schooling: Lessons from research (2012) parental engagement includes the following core behaviours and beliefs:

  • parents’ efforts to increase a child’s enjoyment of and belief in the importance of learning;
  • parents’ belief in their ability to help their children learn; and
  • parents focusing on their children’s emotional wellbeing, as well as their learning, during the school years.

There are many potential benefits from parental engagement in learning. For students, it can foster greater enjoyment of and engagement in learning. This can lead to higher levels of motivation and consequently improved academic outcomes.  Other benefits include the development of effective partnerships, where families and schools work together to address issues that may be impacting on the student’s well-being and achievement (ACT Government).

Research also suggests that parents do not need to invest a significant amount of time or attain specific knowledge to support their children’s learning. Rather, improved educational outcomes can result from a genuine interest and active engagement from parents (Government of South Australia).  Effective ways to do this include:

  • having conversations about what your daughters are learning at school, what they enjoy learning or what they find difficult. It can also mean linking what they’re learning to current events and issues.
  • encouraging reading which can support language development, sentence construction, fluency and creativity. Reading can also be beneficial to memory, relaxation and well-being.
  • supporting your daughters to develop positive relationships with their teachers and encouraging them to talk to their teachers about areas they’re not understanding, how they’re progressing or additional support they would like.
  • creating an effective homework environment, including a dedicated space and time for homework. Younger girls may also benefit from assistance developing a study planner, help when revising or guidance with proofreading.
  • fostering self-belief and educational aspirations.
  • encouraging effort, persistence and challenge and reminding your daughters that failure and mistakes are necessary for growth and learning.
  • encouraging engagement in extension opportunities and activities, particularly those that will aid decision-making and problem-solving skills.
  • discussing post-schooling options and plans for the future.
  • monitoring the use of devices and ensuring they’re used in a balanced way to support health and well-being. This includes ensuring students do not have access to them when they should be sleeping.

Parents play a critical role in providing learning opportunities at home and in linking what students learn at school with what happens elsewhere. By discussing learning and encouraging positive attitudes to school, parents play a vital role in learning and education. Stuartholme School is blessed to have parents who support their daughters’ learning and prioritise working in partnership with the school to ensure the best possible outcomes for the girls.

Deanne Johnston
Deputy Principal

 

ACT Government (2014) Progressing Parental Engagement https://www.education.act.gov.au/teaching_and_learning/parental-engagement/progressing-parental-engagement
Australian Government Department of Education and Training (2018) Parent Engagement in Learning, https://www.education.act.gov.au/teaching_and_learning/parental-engagement/progressing-parental-engagement
Desforges, C., and A. Abouchaar. 2003. The Impact of Parental Involvement, Parental Support and Family Education on Pupil Achievement and Adjustment: A Literature Review. London: Department for Education and Skills.
Emerson, L., Fear. J., Fox, S., and Sanders, E. (2012). Parental engagement in learning and schooling: Lessons from research. A report by the Australian Research Alliance for Children and Youth (ARACY) for the Family-School and Community Partnerships Bureau: Canberra.
Government of South Australia (2014) Towards Best Practice in Parent Involvement in Education: A literature review,  Office of Non-Government Schools and Services, University of South Australia

 

 

 

Message from the Dean of Mission

We’ve had two significant events this week with our Global Service Day and Year 12 Retreat. Last Saturday, as part of our Global Service Day, …

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Message from the Dean of Mission

We’ve had two significant events this week with our Global Service Day and Year 12 Retreat. Last Saturday, as part of our Global Service Day, we invited students who participate in our Sony Camp to come early and spend some time with our community. The children who attend Sony Camp have a variety of special needs so last Saturday was an opportunity for our community to be with them and their families. Thanks to our skilled volunteers and our Year 11 & 12 Sony Companions, we had a variety of activities that included slime making, obstacle courses, dancing and outdoor activities! A big thanks to the staff and parents who came along to help – it was a lovely display of our Sacred Heart community.

On Monday our 120 Year 12 students and 14 staff members journeyed up to QCCC Mapleton to participate in their final retreat – ‘Journey of the Heart’. Over the three days the cohort and staff participated in large and small group activities where they were offered opportunities to reflect on their journey; where they have been, where they are at this moment where they hope to be in the future. The sessions were structured around the five goals of Sacred Heart education, which provide us with a framework through which we can navigate life. To demonstrate how to maintain positive wellbeing activities after school, we had a few activities that allowed the students to be present in the moment. Rhythm Culture came and did an African drumming class, there was yoga, bush walking and storytelling. A big thank you to the girls for having an open heart and mind to the three days and for sharing their joys and experiences with us. Also, a big thanks to the staff for journeying with the girls in this significant event.

Sarah Daff
Dean of Mission

 

Message from the Dean of Boarding

Dear Parents and Guardians, As Term 3 draws to a close and Stuartholme Boarding has had the privilege of featuring on the cover of last …

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Message from the Dean of Boarding

Dear Parents and Guardians,

As Term 3 draws to a close and Stuartholme Boarding has had the privilege of featuring on the cover of last weekend’s The Australian Boarding School Supplement, I thought it might be a good chance to share some of the current thinking about what boarding offers young people and why it is, more than ever, an opportunity for good mental health and excellent social and educational habits and practices.

What our boarders say they most value about the experience of boarding is:

  • A very developed set of friendships that endure a lifetime.
  • Being part of a community; feeling like you belong to something bigger than yourself.
  • Learning the skills of independence in particular self-organisation, emotional regulation and coping with life’s ups and downs without depending on your parents all the time.
  • A rich inter-cultural experience: Stuartholme offers a mini-microcosm of broader Australian society and girls learn to value diversity and build inter-cultural awareness.
  • Leadership and mentoring opportunities; Stuartholme boarding has an extensive leadership program and offers a range of leadership positions within the boarding school.

What Stuartholme believes boarding offers our young women:

  •  The opportunity to strengthen resilience and emotional flexibility; these are vital skills to be psychologically healthy and a well-balanced adult.
  • The chance to feel connected to others; you can’t escape other people in boarding life!
  • Healthy sleep routines, good nutrition and boundaries around the use of technology: all of these are said by Dr Michael Carr-Gregg to create happy adolescents.
  • Academic care programs which support boarders’ learning and put in place structures and resources to facilitate effective study routines.
  • A vibrant recreation program that includes opportunities for service learning and volunteering.

When Leigh McCluskie from The Australian spoke to me about the changes that have occurred in boarding over the past ten years, I highlighted that:

  • Boarding schools are now focussed on the wellbeing and holistic care of young people: the individual can flourish and gone is the one size suits all model.
  • This understanding of individual adolescents and their needs also includes an awareness of personality types and how we need to allow for this in boarding i.e. how do we help introverts find space and quiet?
  • Stuartholme Boarding has Year Level specific Wellbeing Programs which are run using a strengths based approach. Examples include a fortnightly Walk and Talk with A Pet for Year 8 Boarders; this week our Year 7s made Christmas boxer shorts using the Home Ec sewing machines!
  • Boarding is no longer a purely residential model. We work in an integrated manner with the day school to make the overall school and boarding experience as seamless and holistic as possible. Our teachers know what is happening in the lives of our boarders.
  • Boarding staff are skilled particularly in the areas of youth mental health: at Stuartholme, boarding is a chosen occupation and career, not a “filler”.
  • Boarding schools are in active partnerships with families and community ie rural trips, ICPA conferences.
  • Stuartholme does offer different models of boarding including short-term boarding (a minimum of four weeks is required) and more urban families are considering boarding as a way to enhance their daughter’s overall school performance. If you are interested in these options, please contact the school’s registrar, Natasha Pay (npay@stuartholme.com) and I would be happy to meet you also.

Important Information for the Start of Term 4

  • The Boarding House re-opens from 8 am on Monday 8 October
  • You are welcome to have morning or afternoon tea at school when dropping off
  • Please drop off your daughter at the roundabout and then park on the oval
  • Girls need to be in by 5 pm
  • The day school begins on Tuesday 9 October
  • The Boarder Parent Network Committee meets from 10-11.30 am in the Board Room on Monday 8 October. Please let Susan Shay Co-ordinator know if you would like to attend (shay@bigpond.com)

I would like to close by wishing your families safe travels, good family time together over the break and all the joy of the wonderful fairy lit Winter Wonderland that was this term’s Girls’ Night In!

I am so proud of each one of the boarders, of our committed and passionate staff and how we pulled together in Term 3 to make Stuartholme boarding a kind, inclusive, involved and independent community in which each boarder was able to do and be her best self!

 

Happy holidays

Warm regards,

Andrée Rice
Dean of Boarding

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Message from the Dean of Student Wellbeing

Making the best of the holiday period As the term wraps up and your daughter embarks on the holiday period, it is a great opportunity …

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Message from the Dean of Student Wellbeing

Making the best of the holiday period

As the term wraps up and your daughter embarks on the holiday period, it is a great opportunity for her to recharge her batteries and relax.

Rather than leaving her to spend every waking moment on her phone and only engage in electronic devices, the Spring break provides the chance to unwind and enjoy some downtime free from technology.

Research shows that striking this balance is very important for her health and wellbeing. Spending significant amounts of time on technology has also been shown to reduce the naturally produced Melatonin levels in teenagers that helps them get quality sleep.

Negotiating effective limits for the use of technology

The experts tell us that working together with your daughter to negotiate mutually agreed limits for your daughter’s technology use is the best plan, rather than dictating the rules. This still includes putting in place clear boundaries as a parent. Taking into consideration the age of your child and any specific problem areas are also important in coming up with a compromise. Some of the key areas to consider in negotiating limits may include:

  • Agreed hours to remain off technology overnight
  • Phone free time that will be enjoyed each day
  • Expectations that your family has about the use of technology at particular times e.g. when there are visitors, during meal times, during conversations.

Understanding the important role that technology can play in the world of a teenager and negotiating boundaries together will not only enhance her wellbeing but improve the quality of your relationship.

Exploring a range of different ways to relax

Seize the opportunity over the holidays to help your daughter pursue a range of different activities to relax.

It is optimal to build up a range of different ways that she enjoys relaxing. Challenge your daughter to try some activities that she normally would not do to help balance out the tendency to overuse technology and devices.

Some suggestions might include:

  • Exercising
  • Reading a good book
  • Spending time with the family
  • Doing craft
  • Playing music
  • Listening to music
  • Cooking
  • Being with nature
  • See a good movie
  • Spending time with friends in the outdoors
  • Swimming
  • Dancing
  • Doing yoga or meditation
  • Cleaning up/ helping around the house

References:

  1. Branden, C. and Ivens, C. 2009. Thinking Skills for Peak performance. Macmillan: Melbourne.
  2. Hughes, S. 2018. Skip the Drama: practical get-ahead strategies to survive your daughter’s teenage years. Exisle publishing.
  3. Haesler, D. 2018. Exploring Positive Psychology for Wellbeing. Symposium at St Peters Lutheran College.

A commitment to ongoing professional learning

Last week the Leaders of Student Wellbeing, Counsellors and I attended a guest lecture from Dan Haesler, a well-regarded practitioner in the area of student wellbeing. The symposium we attended at St Peter’s Lutheran College proved to be an effective professional learning opportunity about the role of positive psychology in supporting student wellbeing.

We look forward to taking on board advice offered as we continue to support best practice implementation in the area of Student Wellbeing.

 

Deb Lonsdale-Walker
Dean of Student Wellbeing

 

 

Co-curricular News

Equestrian This term may have been a quieter time for our equestrian competitors but it is still just as busy with training and competitions outside …

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Co-curricular News

Equestrian

This term may have been a quieter time for our equestrian competitors but it is still just as busy with training and competitions outside of interschool.  After the teams amazing effort at the State Championships in July, we had our post celebration lunch party on 7 August to congratulate all riders on their achievements.

We give a very warm welcome to Sienna Pelto, who has now joined the Stuartholme Equestrian family.  We hope she enjoys herself immensely being part of this team and learns all about the sport through her journey here at Stuartholme.  A lifetime of friendships and memories will be made.

We have some new four legged friends joining our team.  Big hugs and carrots to Grace Anthony’s fabulous new horse, Yogi.  I see big things installed for this new partnership. Grace’s big sister, Bella also has a new mount, Oscar.  He is still a “toddler” at present but I’m sure they will blossom together.  I hear he is quite the mischievous character in the paddock!  Aalia Lucchetta has now purchased Cougar.  Aalia has been riding Cougar throughout the season in the dressage competitions with much success.  We look forward to seeing this combination in full force next year.

Five of our equestrian riders have secured their spot on the Queensland Team to compete at the Australian Interschool Equestrian Championships.  Riders (and their horses) will be travelling to Werribee, Victoria next week for the start on competition on Monday 1 October.  This is a huge distance for horse/rider/parents to travel, plus the five days of competition at the venue.  I would like to thank Stuartholme School for their continued support to our equestrian team.  Our five riders who were selected to represent Queensland are Emily Ballard, Piper Searle, Bella Anthony, Ellie Turnbull and Georgia Rink.  Unfortunately, Georgia’s horse Jo has sustained a niggling injury and will now not be fit enough to make the journey south.  A real shame for the Rink family but we will see this combination back out in the new season.  Our own Emily Ballard is the 2018 Queensland State Equestrian Captain, another feather in Emily’s cap!  Well done Emily and congratulations to our riders for making this squad.  The team and I wish these riders a safe, fun and amazing five days of competition.  Good luck ladies!

All our riders have been fortunate enough to be involved in two workshops from leading sports/performance psychologist, Jonah Oliver.  Jonah brings a unique and effective approach to gaining peak performance, whilst (hopefully) giving the girls skills to cope with all facets of life. The riders, I hope have benefited from his engaging workshops.

We will finish the year with our final camp over the weekend of 10-11 November.  We will be heading to Cabarita Beach, NSW to enjoy gallops on the beach, swimming with the horses and of course some training in between!  We will welcome our new riders for 2019 and say our (sad) goodbyes to our Year 12 riders.

Happy holidays, happy horses!

Yours in equestrian
Sarah Drane
Equestrian Coordinator

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Bus Registrations

School Bus registrations for Term 4, 2018 are now open. If your daughter is intending to use the Stuartholme School Bus network, please register and …

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Bus Registrations

School Bus registrations for Term 4, 2018 are now open. If your daughter is intending to use the Stuartholme School Bus network, please register and pay on the Stuartholme website. Seats are limited, so we recommend registering as soon as possible.

Final date for Co-curricular photos

The photographers will be back on Friday 12 October to take the final Co-curricular photos. You will see in the schedule below that we also …

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Final date for Co-curricular photos

The photographers will be back on Friday 12 October to take the final Co-curricular photos. You will see in the schedule below that we also have to re-take four team photos, they are Netball Team 2, Touch Team 1, Tennis Senior A and Touch Team 9.

The photos will be taken at the back of the oval.

To avoid Year 12 students missing any class time, all photos involving Year 12s are scheduled for lunch time. All other photos will be taken during Period 5. There are a large number to get through, so we need this to be an efficient process.

Can you please:

  1. Arrive on time
  2. Bring your ID card for scanning
  3. Line up with your team/group in height order (shortest to tallest)

These photos will be in the 2018 Yearbook. You will also have the opportunity to purchase one if you want to.

 

Time Group Name Time Group Name
12.45 Basketball Open A 1.30 Basketball Intermediate B
Basketball Open B Basketball Intermediate C
Basketball Open C Basketball Junior B
Netball Team 2 (retake) Basketball Junior C
Touch Team 1 (retake) Tennis (retake)
Student Representative Council Touch Team 9 (retake)
Liturgy Robotics
Drama Debating 11.1
Music Committee Debating 10.1
JPIC Debating 9.1
Debating Senior A Debating 9.2
Student Events Debating 9.3
Debating 12.1 Debating 9.4
Readers’ Cup Opens Debating 8.1
Debating 8.2
Debating 7.1
Debating 7.2
Readers’ Cup 7.1
Readers’ Cup 7.2
Readers’ Cup 7.3
Readers’ Cup 8
Readers’ Cup 9
Readers’ Cup 10
Future Problem Solvers 1
Future Problem Solvers 2
Future Problem Solvers 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year 8 Arts Fiesta

On Tuesday 18 September, The Year 8 students showcase their classroom work in Drama, Music and Visual Art at the 2018 Arts Fiesta! Each student …

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Year 8 Arts Fiesta

On Tuesday 18 September, The Year 8 students showcase their classroom work in Drama, Music and Visual Art at the 2018 Arts Fiesta!

Each student in the Year 8 cohort performed as part of the showcase which was inspired by Sara West’s play, The Trolleys.

The Drama students performed The Trolleys, bringing to life the characters and narrative through very entertaining characters. The Music students formed a band and beautifully performed Jazz spirituals as well as Stand By Me by Ben E King. The Visual Art students created a moving gallery of lanterns, each handcrafted and painted.

Our showcase finished with a rainbow of celebration! The Music students performed Geronimo by Sheppard, as the Drama and Visual Arts students created a rainbow of colour and light.

All of the students performed with energy and confidence, receiving excellent reviews from their audience of parents and peers. I congratulate all of the Year 8s on their truly wonderful performance.

Arts Fiesta would not have been the success it was without the creativity and commitment of our Arts staff. A huge congratulations to Jen McGrath, Andrew Mear, Sam Blakeney, Pierina Curties, Nan Chesterman and Nick Olsen for giving the Year 8s such a rich artistic experience, one I’m sure the girls will always remember.

Lucy Harkin
Drama Teacher

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Short term boarding options

Did you know Stuartholme offers a number of boarding options? The Boarding House is open to our day families too. Short-term boarding is available during …

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Short term boarding options

Did you know Stuartholme offers a number of boarding options?

The Boarding House is open to our day families too. Short-term boarding is available during term time to help with co-curricular sports or for parents who need to travel.

For more information about our boarding options, including the terms and conditions, please contact Enrolments via email or telephone 3510 6419.

Year 11 Parents Night Out

The cafe is the beautiful Seven-VII-South at Yeronga (www.sevensouthyeronga.com.au/) Monday 22 October from 6.40pm until around 9.50pm. $55 per person -alternate drop – will cater …

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Year 11 Parents Night Out

The cafe is the beautiful Seven-VII-South at Yeronga (www.sevensouthyeronga.com.au/)

Monday 22 October from 6.40pm until around 9.50pm.

$55 per person -alternate drop – will cater for dietary requirements.

Get your tickets NOW https://www.trybooking.com/426463

Hope to see you there!

If you would like to be added to the Year 11 FaceBook Group, please email me on kelliebroderick@yahoo.com.au

 

Women in STEMM Event

The Department of Health Women’s Network is a pathway for inspiration, change and equality. It was established to inform and support the department to progress towards …

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Women in STEMM Event

The Department of Health Women’s Network is a pathway for inspiration, change and equality. It was established to inform and support the department to progress towards a more inclusive workplace.

Aimed at young women in Years 10-12 considering a career in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine (STEMM), the Women in STEMM event provides an opportunity to showcase the many careers that are available, and the different paths that these careers can take. You will hear from inspiring speakers successful in their careers and who will highlight the challenges faced by women in STEMM, and how these individuals have responded to these challenges.

Women are making significant contributions to the STEMM fields. If you know a young woman in year 10-12, consider encouraging them to attend this event with you where they will be offered advice and guidance toward their STEMM career.

Date: Thursday 11 October 2018

Time: Event commences at 4pm with a networking opportunity including drinks and nibbles from 5pm.

Where: Forensic and Scientific Services Conference Theatre, 39 Kessels Rd Coopers Plains QLD 4108

Register

Speakers include:

Dr Amy Jennison, Supervising Scientist of Molecular Epidemiology, Public Health Microbiology
o    Leads a team in the molecular detection, characterisation and typing of microbes, particularly notifiable pathogens.

o    Special interests in characterising emerging pathogens and in harnessing molecular advances for expanding efficiencies and capabilities in Public Health Microbiology.

o    Lectures at two Queensland Universities and supervises research students.

Dr Gemma Robertson, Clinical Microbiologist, Public and Environmental Health
o    Gemma divides her time as a clinical microbiologist between Forensic and Scientific Services and the Central laboratory at Pathology Queensland.

o    Chair of the FSS Medical Advisory Committee and Deputy Chair of the FSS Human Ethics Committee.

o    Winner, DS Nelson Trainee Prize, RCPA Update 2016, ‘Strongyloides stecoralis PCR in North Queensland’

Associate Professor Kathy Andrews, Deputy Director, Griffith Institute for Drug Discovery
o    WiT Life Sciences Research Leader award, Women in Technology 2017

o    Future Fellowship, Australian Research Council 2009 – 2014

o    Co-author of That’s RAD! Science project.

You will also hear from two PhD students from Griffith University
For further information about this event or other Women’s Network events, visit the Women’s Network page on QHEPS or email the Women’s Network Steering Committee.

Be part of our history

To celebrate 100 years of Stuartholme history, the School has partnered with Kiss Photography to produce a limited edition Photo Anthology hard cover book, to be …

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Be part of our history

To celebrate 100 years of Stuartholme history, the School has partnered with Kiss Photography to produce a limited edition Photo Anthology hard cover book, to be released in 2020.

As you are an important part of Stuartholme’s history, we invite your family to participate in a beautiful family portraiture session and share your Stuartholme story.

For more information and to register, visit www.stuartholme.com/events

Notice from Qld Police regarding North Stradbroke Island

The Queensland Police Service and North Stradbroke Island Police would like to wish all students, parents and their families an enjoyable and safe September School …

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Notice from Qld Police regarding North Stradbroke Island

The Queensland Police Service and North Stradbroke Island Police would like to wish all students, parents and their families an enjoyable and safe September School Holidays this year and respectfully request that be mindful of the following advice and information with regards to those attending North Stradbroke Island this year.

In previous years, North Stradbroke Island has been subject to a large influx youths which in combination with alcohol and illegal drugs has resulted in anti-social youth related activity.  This year, as in previous years, the Queensland Police Service will be heavily enforcing any behaviour deemed to be anti-social, disorderly, violent, or infringing the laws legislated to protect Queenslanders.  Laws to limit this behaviour include and are not limited to, noise complaints from private premises and public places, out of control events in private premises, public violence and/or intoxication, drink/drug driving, possession of illegal drugs.

Youths caught committing these offences in public places or private residences could be subject to the following consequences and may be charged and summonsed to appear before a magistrates Court:

  • Parties in private premises where more than 12 people are gathered and any combination of three offences are occurring or likely to occur, the ‘Responsible            Guardian/Organiser’ of the party may receive up to three years imprisonment and    up to $21,000.00 in fines plus be required to pay all costs incurred in respect to              Police attendance and resources utilised that is now inclusive of the Police
  • Noise complaint attendance by Police at private premises can incur a 96 hour ‘Noise Abatement Direction’ to the primary occupier.  Contravention of this direction may            result in up to $5200.00 in fines.
  • Any disorderly, violent behaviour will result in on the spot fines of $391.00 and/or a summons to appear before the Magistrates Court.
  • More serious offences such as assaults and drug related matters could result in incarceration in a watchhouse, earliest appearance before the Magistrates Court and            being placed on Bail Reporting conditions.

The further ongoing consequences of having convictions of these offences on a person’s criminal history can detrimentally affect a person’s future job and travel prospects.  In previous years Police are aware of medical implications from unsupervised parental attendance that has resulted in youth pregnancy, transmission of STD’s and injuries sustained from incidents/accidents related to intoxication and/or violence.

Police advise that parents attend North Stradbroke Island with their children and reside at the same accommodation in order to properly supervise being mindful of Liquor Act Legislation relating to minors on premises consuming alcohol whereas the ‘Responsible Guardian’ they can appropriately supervise any gathering.  Infractions of these laws could result in fines to the Responsible Guardian.

In years past, Parents have booked accommodation for their children and either not attended the North Stradbroke Island or resided at a different address.  Real Estates and Resorts have policies in place forbidding this.  Consequences will lead to immediate eviction and/or loss of any bond paid.

The North Stradbroke Island community and Police welcome all tourists to the island and ask that they respect the laws and the environment.  We further would like to extend our best wishes for a safe, exciting and happy holiday for all.