Message from the Principal

Dear Parents, Caregivers and Friends,

As we draw to the end of Term 3, we can reflect on the high energy and exuberance of co-curricular successes, our sophisticated dramatic expression and our powerful collective focus for QCS testing.

After a highly successful season of Rowing, we won the First VIII and Percentage Cup and 2nd in the Aggregate Cup. Matt Marden and his team of dedicated coaches have set high standards this season. Our Rowing community are passionate advocates for our rowers. To our Rowing girls, I admire your tenacity in training and I honour your hard work. Congratulations on our Head of the River successes.

Netball, our biggest sport, with around 150 students, also had a great season. Five teams made it to the Grand Finals with two teams becoming Champions. Congratulations to Sheryl Scanlan, her passionate coaches, our supportive parents and our Netball girls for all their hard work and commitment to playing Netball.

Our Senior A Debating Team won their Grand Final against St Rita’s College, the first time anyone can remember an all-girls Grand Final. A huge congratulation to Alex Cashin and her team of coaches for developing our girls over the year.

Our Senior Production, Picnic at Hanging Rock, was another example of outstanding achievement. The performance was sophisticated and innovative. The atmospheric setting was in our outdoor amphitheatre, the costuming and lighting were cleverly minimalistic, enabling the acting and characterisation to be the genuine focus of the dramatic piece. The dialogue was complex and highly articulate; the actors were mesmerising as they transitioned through multiple characters. I congratulate Lucy Harkin and honour her as an artist and as a Director. She challenged and enabled each Senior Drama student to successfully portray their multiple characters through an erudite script and starkly simple setting. It was a privilege to see such work in a secondary school.

After such significant successes this Term, we then transitioned into the Year 12 QCS Test. Once again I was so proud. Our Year 12 cohort entered into the QCS Test with calm strength and unified focus. They understood the challenge ahead of them, conveyed a quiet confidence that they were ready and strode in with self-assurance and self-regulated nerves. Our Year 12 girls deserve our respect in how they conducted themselves under pressure. The QCS Test delineated the beginning of exams for Senior students. I wish the girls all the very best for their exams and assessments.

Last week in Sydney, Sarah Daff, Sr Rita Carroll rscJ and I attended the ASIANZ (Asia, Australian and New Zealand) Heads of Sacred Schools Conference at Kincoppal Rose Bay. Five regions, India, Taiwan, Korea, Japan and Australia/New Zealand, presented their educational achievements and challenges. Two keynote speakers from Indonesia and the United States addressed the 26 delegates. The stories of overcoming political and economic issues were inspiring and the underlying commonality in believing in our Sacred Heart Goals and educating girls to be capable and compassionate leaders was palpable. I thoroughly enjoyed meeting face-to-face with Heads of Schools who had met our International Exchange girls and our Antipodean trekkers. We committed to a representative council, to develop a forum to share resources and to communicate regularly across our ASIANZ Provinces. It is at these times, we celebrate our internationality, our differences and our common aspirations.

A huge thank you to all who have contributed to all our successes this Term.

God bless and take care,

Kristen Sharpe
Principal

 

Key Dates

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Key Dates

DateEvent
Fri 7-Fri 14 SeptemberYears 11 & 12 assessment block
Mon 17 SeptemberYear 11 QCS Practice Test
Mon 17-Wed 19 SeptemberYear 12 Retreat
Tues 18 SeptemberYear 8 Arts Fiesta
Tues 18-Fri 21 SeptemberJunior Art Display
Thurs 20 SeptemberClasses finish
Fri 21 SeptemberBoarders travel day
Sat 22-Mon 24 SeptemberSony Camp
Mon 8 OctoberBoarders return
Boarder Parent Network meeting 10-11.30am
Parent Community Groups Principal Meeting 11.30am-12.30pm
Tues 9 OctoberYears 7-11 School fees due
Students start Term 4
Tues 16 OctoberYear 7 immunisations
Fri 19-Fri 26 OctoberMajor Art Exhibition
Opening night, 19 October.
Mon 22 OctoberStudent free day
Year 11 Semi-formal
Fri 26 OctoberSpring Spectacular 6pm
Mon 29 OctoberCelebration of Excellence 7pm
Fri 2 NovemberYear 12 Parent Daughter Breakfast 7am
Sun 4 NovemberMusic Breakfast 9am
Mon 5-Fri 9 NovemberYear 12 assessment block
Wed 14 NovemberYear 12 Boarders Farewell Liturgy and dinner
Thurs 15 NovemberYear 12 Valedictory Mass and Cocktail Party
Fri 16 NovemberYear 12 final day
Tues 20-Mon 26 NovemberYear 11 assessment block
Tues 27- Wed 28 November Year 11 QCS Practice Test
Thurs 29 NovemberCommunity Celebrations of St Philippine Duchesne with Carols, 5pm
Fri 30 November Boarders travel day
Christmas Liturgy and Final Assembly
Classes finish 12pm
Year 12 final fee statement issued
Wed 5 DecemberFinal day to return all library books and textbook hire
Fri 14 December2019 School fees (with discount) due

Message from the Deputy Principal

Last week ACARA released 2018 NAPLAN data. Stuartholme School’s 2018 scaled scores show that, as expected, our students continue to perform above state levels.  Whilst …

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Message from the Deputy Principal

Last week ACARA released 2018 NAPLAN data. Stuartholme School’s 2018 scaled scores show that, as expected, our students continue to perform above state levels.  Whilst pleasing to note, school performance in comparison to the state mean is not a sufficient measure of analysis in itself. Unfortunately, further analysis of Stuartholme’s Year 7 data is limited because, by the time of NAPLAN tests, our Year 7s have had little more than a term at the school and we do not have their Year 5 data from their feeder schools.

Year 7 Stuartholme

Average Scaled Score

% above State Average Scaled Score Stuartholme –

% of students in Achievement Band 7 or above

Queensland –

% of students in Achievement Band 7 or above

Grammar & Punctuation 576 6.27% 72.5 55.3
Reading 572 6.71% 73.5 55.6
Spelling 569 5.18% 71.6 56.7
Writing 526 6.69% 48 30
Numeracy 558 3.34% 69.7 56.2

 

In Year 9, where we have data collected over time, it is more meaningful to measure student growth in each of the domains tested by NAPLAN.  Growth is a valuable measure of school improvement as it is specific to the students at the school and it demonstrates the impact the school has had on student performance.  An analysis of our Year 9 data clearly shows that Stuartholme is increasing our students’ learning outcomes in literacy and numeracy.

Year 9 Year 9, 2018

Average Scaled Score

% above State Average Scaled Score % of Stuartholme students in top 3 achievement bands in Year 7 NAPLAN – 2016 % of Stuartholme students in top 3 achievement bands in Year 9 NAPLAN – 2018
Grammar & Punctuation 621 7.25% 50% 79%
Reading 624 8.15% 47% 82%
Spelling 620 6.9% 36% 75%
Writing 579 10.07% 23% 54%
Numeracy 609 3.57% 51% 72%

Seeing evidence of growth is obviously pleasing but the data also provides an important function in that it allows us to identify cohort trends, including strengths and areas for improvement.  This allows us to implement evidence-based learning programs and take steps to ensure every student is provided with the best possible opportunity to grow.

The problem with the media focus that undoubtedly comes with the release of NAPLAN results is that it can unduly influence parental and student expectations about what schools should deliver, how subjects should be taught and how schools are performing. This runs the risk of undermining a school’s ability to develop rich curricula and innovative, deep learning experiences as teachers ‘teach to the test’ rather than striving to be individually developmental.

NAPLAN data therefore should provide information so that schools can facilitate opportunities for remediation, improvement and extension, but it should not drive the education agenda. This is the role of schools and teachers whose care for students ensures a commitment to the provision of engaging, challenging programs necessary for the development of the higher-order skills, knowledge and understandings, many of which are not assessed in the NAP testing.

QCS test – 4th and 5th September

This week many of our Year 12s sat the QCS test. The day started well with a buffet breakfast served in the dining room followed by reflection and prayer in the chapel. This routine ensured the girls were relaxed and focused as they approached what can only be described as an intensive testing regime. I’d like to thank the Year 12s for their attitude and approach over the two days – they were nothing short of outstanding.  Much appreciation goes to Mrs Shannon Lacey, Director of Senior Studies, for her preparation and organisation of our QCS program and her facilitation of the testing days. Thanks also to Mrs Christine Heath for her organisation and assistance over the days. I have every confidence that our girls were thoroughly prepared and we hope they are rewarded for their dedication and commitment when results are released later in the year.

PISA testing – 6th September

On Thursday a number of our students were selected to be involved in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2018 which provides important information to policymakers, educators, teachers and researchers. PISA assesses students’ skills and knowledge in reading, mathematics, science and financial literacy, providing both a national and international perspective. The results of PISA provide information towards monitoring how well young Australians are meeting important educational goals, assists in identifying areas of strengths and weaknesses in the Australian education system, allows the comparison of student performance with other countries, and enables policymakers, researchers and teachers to learn from other education systems around the world.

The Australian Council for Educational Research conducts random sampling of schools and students each year for PISA.  All sampled schools are mandated to participate to continue to receive funding from the Commonwealth, states and territories education authorities. This year, Stuartholme School was selected.

I thank all the girls for their cooperation and mature approach to the testing, particularly during a time already filled with in-school assessment and other commitments.  Further information about the assessment is available at www.acer.org/ozpisa.

Approaching the last two weeks of term

Last Friday, I talked to the girls on assembly about the pressures of the end of term.  I asked them to do the following 6 things:

  1. Firstly, if they haven’t done so yet, they should start studying for their exams. Spacing out study over many sessions is far more beneficial than trying to cram the night before an exam. No one can study for 6 hours straight and be effective.
  2. Secondly, they should break their study sessions into short 20 minute chunks. This is actually the most effective thing for your brain. This does not mean to limit study for 20 minutes a night. Rather, it means study for 20 minutes, have a short break, perhaps get a drink of water, stretch your legs, have a brief chat, then start another 20-minute session. Students should do several 20 minute sessions in one evening.
  3. Thirdly, students need planned and timed breaks to help them remain on task. Using break time to check social media is to be avoided as this will only distract and preoccupy. Research shows that it can take up to 20 minutes to refocus once you’re distracted.
  4. Importantly, to succeed with assessment, and remain healthy, the girls need to eat well. They need to eat plenty of protein, fresh fruit and vegetables. A good breakfast every morning is vital as they cannot perform well in exams without this.
  5. The girls should also be engaging in some form of exercise. Nothing de-stresses the mind faster than physical activity. A walk around the neighbourhood, session at the gym or time on the backyard trampoline can all help rejuvenate and facilitate better retention of material.
  6. Most importantly, the girls need to sleep well. It has been scientifically proven that a good night’s sleep will aid retention of studied material more effectively than late nights studying. High school students need at least 8 hours every single night.

It is also important to remember that not all stress is bad as it can actually be a motivating force. However, it’s vital to know when stress has tipped over from motivating to becoming an overwhelming emotion. This is when talking to someone and getting strategies to help manage the stress is important.

I wish all our students the very best as they enter the Term 3 examination and assessment period.

Deanne Johnston
Deputy Principal

 

Message from the Dean of Mission

Global Day of Service – A call to action! One of the amazing gifts of being part of the Sacred Heart family is our internationality. …

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Message from the Dean of Mission

Global Day of Service – A call to action!

One of the amazing gifts of being part of the Sacred Heart family is our internationality. Australia is one of 34 provinces in the international Society of the Sacred Heart. Religious of the Sacred Heart and those who work in Sacred Heart organisations consider themselves members of this one international community, and this unity is important. The words cor unum et anima una in Corde Jesu (one heart and one soul in the Heart of Jesus) are our school’s and the RSCJs motto.

Just eighteen years after its founding, the Society of the Sacred Heart became an international organisation when Rose Philippine Duchesne and her companions journeyed to the wilds of Missouri. This year marks 200 years since this courageous crossing by Philippine! As benefactors of her actions, we acknowledge Philippine’s call to action and the gift that she gave us in a Sacred Heart education. We believe that education is an act of justice and because of this, we are called to have a social awareness which impels us to action. To celebrate Philippine opening her first school, and therefore the beginning of our internationality, on Saturday 15 September there will be a Global Service Day. The day will begin in New Zealand – the first country to welcome in that day – and will continue as a wave of service across the world. At Stuartholme, we are honouring this day by hosting a Sony Camp Picnic. On this day we will welcome the children who are attending our Sony Foundation Holiday Camp to Stuartholme for a picnic with their families and our community.

Whilst we have organised an event at Stuartholme, we also encourage each of you to consider how you can serve others on this day. You could:

  • donate blood at a Blood Bank,
  • visit the elderly at an aged care facility,
  • volunteer at a local organisation,
  • pick up rubbish at a local creek bed,
  • fundraise for Drought Angels or another charity,
  • cook a meal for a family or person in need or
  • buy essential items for the Refugee Centre and donate them along with a handwritten letter.

The possibilities are endless!! So, on this day we encourage you to step outside your comfort zone, cross frontiers and be in solidarity with others in our community who are in need.

If you do participate in a service activity, please use these hashtags to celebrate our Global Service Day:

#SacredHeartService
#CoeurValues

Sarah Daff
Dean of Mission

 

Message from the Dean of Student Wellbeing

Stress Management Positive Coping Skills Following on from my last newsletter article about stress management, this week I would like to provide tips to parents …

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Message from the Dean of Student Wellbeing

Stress Management

Positive Coping Skills

Following on from my last newsletter article about stress management, this week I would like to provide tips to parents about how to help their daughters adopt positive coping skills.

The research clearly shows that much like adults, teenagers experience stress every day and can benefit from learning positive coping skills. Inadequately managed stress can lead to anxiety, withdrawal, aggression, illness or poor coping skills.

When girls perceive a situation as difficult, changes occur in our minds and bodies to prepare to respond to danger. This “fight or flight” response can include increased heart rate, faster breathing, cold and clammy hands, upset stomach or a feeling of dread.

The very same mechanism that can turn stress on can also turn it off. As soon as we decide that a situation is no longer challenging, our minds and bodies respond accordingly. This “relaxation response” can decrease heart rate and breathing and lead to a sense of wellbeing. It is important that parents work with their daughters to develop a “relaxation response” so that girls are better placed and have more options in responding to stress.

What you can do to support your daughter

  • Keep a close eye on if stress is impacting on her feelings, thoughts and behaviours.
  • Listen carefully and monitor for overloading.
  • Model stress positive coping skills.
  • Proactively encourage participation in sports and co-curricular activities.

Positive techniques to help your daughter cope with stress

  1. Eat regularly and healthily.
  2. Get into a healthy sleep routine.
  3. Be kind to yourself.
  4. Avoid excess caffeine which can increase feelings of anxiety.
  5. Avoid use of alcohol, illegal drugs and tobacco.
  6. Learn relaxation techniques.
  7. Work on time management skills and prioritising tasks.
  8. Exercise regularly.
  9. Have some fun and be creative.
  10. Help others by getting involved in initiatives within the community.
  11. Accept that “It is as it is” and manage distressing thoughts, rather than trying to stop them.
  12. See the bigger picture – consider the helicopter view.

References:

  1. The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP). Stress Management and Teens. February 2013
  2. Time Management Tips retrieved from Therapistaid.com
  3. Vivyan, C. 2010. Positive Steps to Wellbeing retrieved from www.getself.co.uk

 

Deb Lonsdale-Walker
Dean of Student Wellbeing

 

 

Sacraments of Initiation

Recently, we have had a few requests from some students to participate in the Sacraments of Initiation. The Sacraments of Initiation are the way the …

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Sacraments of Initiation

Recently, we have had a few requests from some students to participate in the Sacraments of Initiation.

The Sacraments of Initiation are the way the Catholic Church welcomes followers into its community. There are three rituals – Baptism, Confirmation and the First Eucharist – that allow participants to learn more about the Catholic faith, grow deeper in their relationship with themselves and God, and commit themselves to participating in the community of Christ.

Sr Rita Carroll rscJ will walk with the girls in their preparation for these sacraments and the final ritual will take place with our community at a Boarders Mass on a Sunday in Term 4. If you are interested in learning more or would like your daughter to participate in one or all of these rituals, please email Sr Carroll rscJ at rcarroll@stuartholme.com

Co-curricular News

Netball This year the Netball Community can be proud with 16 teams participating in the Downey Park competition, the most teams that we have had …

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Co-curricular News

Netball

This year the Netball Community can be proud with 16 teams participating in the Downey Park competition, the most teams that we have had to date. It’s fantastic to see the numbers steadily growing every year. We had 9 teams making it through to the Semi Finals and 5 through to the Grand Finals. Big congratulations to Teams 6 who played All Hallows 18 and winning 39 – 31 and Team 12 who played All Hallows 30 in a nail biter match going into extra time and winning 25 – 23.

Thank you to the whole netball community, players, coaches and families for making another year of netball a great one.


Rowing 

Stuartholme had an incredible day at Head of the River last Saturday. Not only did our First VIII win their race, but they were joined on the podium by 21 of our crews.

Congratulations to all the girls – is was an extraordinary achievement.

Single Sculls

Year 12 Single (Phoebe Robinson) – 2nd place
Year 11 Single (Lucy Hope) – 2nd place
Year 10 Single (Claire Loughman) – 6th place
Year 9 Single (Molly Nasser) – 3rd place
Year 8 Single (Harriet Tully) – 3rd place

Crew Boats

Year 8 7th Quad – 1st place (Head of the River Champions)
Year 8 6th Quad – 4th place
Year 8 5th Quad – 3rd place
Year 8 4th Quad – 2nd place
Year 8 3rd Quad – 2nd place
Year 8 2nd Quad – 3rd place
Year 8 1st Quad – 1st place (Head of the River Champions)

YEAR 8 AGE GROUP: 1st overall

Year 9 6th Quad – 3rd place
Year 9 5th Quad – 3rd place
Year 9 4th Quad – 7th place
Year 9 3rd Quad – 3rd place
Year 9 2nd Quad – 3rd place
Year 9 1st Quad – 4th place

YEAR 9 AGE GROUP: 4th overall

Year 10 3rd Quad – 1st place (Head of the River Champions)
Year 10 2nd Quad – 1st place (Head of the River Champions – undefeated)
Year 10 1st Quad – 3rd place

YEAR 10 AGE GROUP: 3rd overall

Senior 4 – 3rd place
Senior 3rd 8 – 2nd place
Senior 2nd 8 – 3rd place
Open 1st 8 – 1st place   (Head of the River Champions – undefeated)

OPEN AGE GROUP: 1st overall
GRUMMIT FAMILY TROPHY (1st 8 race):  1st PLACE
PERCENTAGE CUP: 1st PLACE
AGGREGATE CUP: 2nd PLACE

We would also like to congratulate the following on receiving awards at the Rowing Awards night.

Most Improved – Rower

Year 8 – Scarlett Bradley (Yr 8 7th Quad)
Year 9 – Angela Muirhead (Yr 9 3rd Quad)
Year 10 – Klara Zimmerman (Yr 10 3rd Quad)
Year 11 – Kyla O’Shanassy (Senior 2nd 8)
Year 12 – Belle Townsend (Open 1st 8)

Most Improved – Coxswain

Junior – Charlotte Borjesson (Yr 8 4th Quad)
Senior – Emma Cheel (Senior 3rd 8)

Junior Awards

Junior Coxswain – Belle Henry (Yr 9 2nd Quad)
Junior Oarswoman – Lucia Allen (Yr 8 3rd Quad)
Junior Crew – Year 8 1st Quad

Senior Awards

Senior Coxswain – Grace Gaston (Open 1st 8)
Senior Oarswoman – Lily Chapman (Open 1st 8 reserve / Senior 2nd 8)
Senior Crew – Open 1st 8

Spirit Awards

Bedford Cup (best performing age group at HOTR) – Year 8
Spirit of the Water – Zavier Horder (Year 9)
Services to the Club – Elke Marriott (Captain of Boats / Open 1st 8 bow seat)

Coaching Awards

Most Improved Coach – Lucy Theodore
Junior Coach of the Year – Will Grubanovich
Senior Coach of the Year – Emma McCarthy
Above & Beyond Award – Steve Trezise

 

Options Career Information Bulletin Edition 14

Tips for future-proofing your career, how to find a VET course in Queensland plus many more helpful ideas and tips in this edition of the Options Career …

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Options Career Information Bulletin Edition 14

Tips for future-proofing your career, how to find a VET course in Queensland plus many more helpful ideas and tips in this edition of the Options Career Information Bulletin.

Ken Turnbull
Careers Advisor

 

Science Snippets

Late last month archaeologists found bones of a 13-year-old girl in the Denisovan Cave in Siberia that has the genetic makeup of two different species. …

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Science Snippets

Late last month archaeologists found bones of a 13-year-old girl in the Denisovan Cave in Siberia that has the genetic makeup of two different species. She is believed to have been born approximately 90,000 years ago and to be the first bi-species human. DNA conclude that the girl had a Neanderthal mother and Denisovan father.

 

 

Neanderthals (Homo neanderthalensis) lived throughout Europe and Western Asia until around 30,000 years ago. This species lived in several different ecological zones, survived three glacial periods, and were excellent hunters and tool makers. Denisovans (Homo sapiens denisova), on the other hand, we know very little about. So far they have only been found in Denisova Cave in Siberia as tiny bone fragments. We don’t yet know what they looked like — nor exactly what they were capable of.

This discovery occurred through analysis of ancient DNA, whereby a small piece of the teenager’s bone was pulverised, the DNA extracted, then sequenced. The sequence was compared to previously analysed samples from Neanderthals, modern humans, and Denisovans. Based on other ancient genomes, researchers already had concluded that Denisovans, Neanderthals, and modern humans interbred in ice age Europe and Asia. Her genetic traits could only be explained if her mother was a Neanderthal and her father was a Denisovan.

While this young girl has told us so much about her ancestors, we know very little about her. Because it was only a small piece of one of her long bones found, we don’t know how she died. We can’t know if she suffered any serious illness in her short life, nor if she ever broke a bone. We only know that she lived.

Source: http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/08/ancient-bone-belonged-child-two-extinct-human-species


School News

Stuartholme has been making great strides introducing more environmentally friendly disposable cutlery at the café as well as recyclable bowls and plates in the boarding house. Please make sure to continue this change by recycling your rubbish in the correct bins located around the school. Good luck to girls in assessment next week.


Events and opportunities to look out for

UQ SPARQ-ed:

SPARQ-ed immersion programs are open to all senior year 10, 11 and 12 students and teachers throughout Queensland. NOTE: Students must be at least 15 years old to participate in the Immersion Program. These programs are week-long enrichment activities offered to senior students and teachers in which participants undertake a scientific project devised in collaboration with one of the world renowned research groups within TRI’s partner institutes. Visit https://di.uq.edu.au/sparq-ed/research-immersion-programs  to find availability.

QLD Science Contest:

The 64th Queensland Science Contest is a great opportunity for students from Prep to Year 12 to have their scientific work judged for awards and prizes. Registrations for student entries in the contest will be open until 9 October. Judging is on Saturday 14th October. For information, contact: staq@staq.qld.edu.au

 

By Jacqueline Buttula, UQ Science Ambassador 2018

Year 8s Arts Fiesta

The Stuartholme Arts Department warmly invites you to the Year 8 Arts Fiesta on Tuesday 18 September. The evening will commence with a pizza and …

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Year 8s Arts Fiesta

The Stuartholme Arts Department warmly invites you to the Year 8 Arts Fiesta on Tuesday 18 September.

The evening will commence with a pizza and wine bar at 4.30pm. The first drink is included in your dinner price with a cash bar also available.  The Arts Fiesta is a celebration of our Year 8 Arts students’ achievements in Drama, Visual Art and Music.

Inspired by Sara West’s Trolleys the Year 8 students have worked together to create drama performances, music and art in the form of lanterns. The collaborative performance will start at 5.30pm.

Date: Tuesday 18 September
Time: 4.30pm
Where: Theatre

There is no cost for the performance, however you can purchase a ticket for dinner via trybooking.

Piano Materclass

A group of piano students recently took part in a piano masterclass with Mr Mark Griffiths. The students played beautifully and took on the advice …

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Piano Materclass

A group of piano students recently took part in a piano masterclass with Mr Mark Griffiths.

The students played beautifully and took on the advice given to them byMark. We were extremely grateful to Mark for his time and look forward to welcoming him back to Stuartholme again in the future.

Pétanque Competition

The Year 9 girls were invited by the Marist boys to participate in a French social event. They enjoyed playing French bowls in the winter …

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Pétanque Competition

The Year 9 girls were invited by the Marist boys to participate in a French social event. They enjoyed playing French bowls in the winter sunshine and shared afternoon tea consisting of pink lemonade and sandwiches. Many thanks to Marist College Ashgrove Language Department for hosting us.

Jeanette MacGregor
Teacher

 

Short term boarding options

Did you know Stuartholme offers a number of boarding options? The Boarding House is open to our day families too. Short-term boarding is available during …

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Short term boarding options

Did you know Stuartholme offers a number of boarding options?

The Boarding House is open to our day families too. Short-term boarding is available during term time to help with co-curricular sports or for parents who need to travel.

For more information about our boarding options, including the terms and conditions, please contact Enrolments via email or telephone 3510 6419.

Red Earth Immersion opportunity

For the fourth time, Stuartholme is giving the opportunity to its students to travel to the remote homelands of the Cape York Peninsula in 2019. …

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Red Earth Immersion opportunity

For the fourth time, Stuartholme is giving the opportunity to its students to travel to the remote homelands of the Cape York Peninsula in 2019.

Students will work on a needed project alongside the Traditional Owners of the Jajikal and Bana homelands.  The group will have the chance to be welcomed to country in Bana, go fishing on the beaches of Cape York, spend time with local children of the Jajikal homeland and visit a remote sacred women’s site at a waterfall deep in the Buru homeland.

This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for the girls to be welcomed by traditional clans and families on private lands that are not accessible outside of this setting. The group will cap it all off with an afternoon snorkelling a stunning and isolated part of the outer Great Barrier Reef.

Click here to find out more. If you are interested in attending please email Ms Daff.

 

Dads’ Night Out

It was great to have 40+ gents gather for a beer and chat on Friday night at the Newstead Brewing Co. For the first fathers …

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Dads’ Night Out

It was great to have 40+ gents gather for a beer and chat on Friday night at the Newstead Brewing Co.

For the first fathers only event, it was well attended with dads representing daughters from most years. It was a successful event and is another example of the community spirit that is so strong at Stuartholme.

Special mention to Greg and Alistair for offering to host the evening, to Victoria Brown who assisted in the finer details of the arrangements and to Richard Manthey for doing a wonderful job selling the raffle tickets.

We’d like to acknowledge a few people who donated prizes for the raffle which made $1,550 to be donated to Beyond Blue. Thank you to Brett Head, Pete Nugent, the Brown Family and Brett Rennick for their generous donations.

Congratulations to the Raffle Prize winners who kick-started their Father’s Day weekend with a positive start.  The winners of the four prizes were Tony Lyons, Richard Manthey, Mark Walker and Alistair Brown.

At Stuartholme, the Friday before Father’s Day is traditionally reserved as a “Dad’s function” so please note in your calendars, Friday, 30 August 2019.  If you have some comment/feedback, suggestions regarding drinks on Friday night or would like to volunteer NOW to organise next year’s “Dad’s Night Out”, please reply to pos@stuartholme.com at your convenience.

Again, Parents of Stuartholme thank you for supporting this event and hope you’ll continue to play a role in the school’s community.

Click on a photo to start gallery